The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

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Ken Viewer

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The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostMon Jan 29, 2018 2:10 pm

[MODERATOR'S NOTE: This is a thread about seeing movies that started as a tangent in this thread on Kino's Fritz Lang box set.]

Mike Gebert wrote:Well, I guess I've never seen a silent film then.


Did you ever patronize revival houses run by people like the late Richard Schwarz in New York City? Richard had previously been in the business of acquiring, restoring and selling used 35 MM projectors that could project a true image, at the true speed, of silent films.

When he acquired the lease on Manhattan's 275+-seat Thalia Theatre, he'd periodically show silent films -- at their intended projection speed, since he was the main projectionist at that theatre -- using adequate carbon-arc settings (used to concern me, when I hung out in the projection booth with Richard and his merry band of characters, that the silver-nitrate film would catch fire) to an audience that had lined up around the block to get into that tiny location.

That's what I thought revival houses were about; more so than showing "art" films. But when his landlord allegedly kept harrassing him to get Richard to give up the valuable lease, he did give up when he told me he was threatened by a thug armed with a handgun, and bought the Cinema Village building, to run films from his massive collection, from other collectors (on loan), from questionable sources (I did not write "stolen"), etc. Buying theatre buildings had proven to be a bad bet after The Roaring 20s, and Richard soon couldn't pay the mortgage and sold it.

The silent movies were made to be shown in theatres, and that's still where they should be shown. As old age has crept up on me and my mobility is shot, I don't travel to the bottom of the world (lower Manhattan) any longer and don't know if silent films, projected faithfully, are being exhibited down there.

Hard to believe Richard died 27 years ago, at age 39. Time flies. But I can't fly in order to avoid Manhattan traffic and the failing New York City subway system, to get to the downtown "art" theatres here, if they still show silent films as intended by the creators. (The Thalia has been gutted and a smaller version, in its original home, reopened under other management as the Leonard Nimoy Flying Saucer or something...) My opinion of the new management is not printable. With all the screens available in the plexes, one would think each multiplex would dedicate one screen and a projection booth to genuine films, especially silent films...but I guess too many of us are under doctors' orders not to buy the slop sold at the plexes concession stands...

If we'd only promise to purchase popcorn covered in motor oil with a couple of pounds of candy and 96 ounces of toxic soda...we might start a trend to bring back silent films to theatres.

Ken
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bigshot

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Re: FRITZ LANG SILENT BLU BOX from Kino

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 1:43 am

I don't ever want to have to go back to a theater again. My home theater is better on every count. Just give me great blu-rays to screen.
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Mike Gebert

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Re: FRITZ LANG SILENT BLU BOX from Kino

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 10:13 am

Ken Viewer's post got me thinking and I think the only time I've been to a movie in New York was to see Disney's Alice cartoons at the Museum of the Moving Image when J.B. Kaufman's Walt in Wonderland book came out. By all reports, the existing theaters in NY are nothing physically for other cities to be jealous of, though the offerings are.

Anyway, I like movies in theaters. I like festivals even when the theater is a meeting room with 16mm set up in the back, I like cool old theaters to see things in, I keep meaning to go to this one in the Chicago area some time:

http://www.thecatlow.com

If there's a chance to see something in a cool old theater, wherever I am, I take it. Maybe the coolest theater I ever went to was this one, with Rockwell Kent murals:

http://berkshirereview.net/rockwell-ken ... ema-mural/

And I watch a lot of things at home, obviously.

I'm pretty tolerant of whatever the technical level of people showing old movies is but I'm happy to say it gets better and better (repertory showings, not the run of the multiplex mill).

Theaters are great. Home theaters are great.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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Daniel Eagan

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Re: FRITZ LANG SILENT BLU BOX from Kino

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 12:09 pm

The Cape Cinema looks fantastic. We stumbled across Kent's Adirondack farm Asgaard one afternoon: http://asgaardfarm.com/history

I go to a lot of theaters in NYC. I like MoMA's two theaters because the quality of projection is really good (not so the attendees). I hope the new Film Forum will have better sight-lines. I really dislike theaters where the seats move and they throw water at you: https://www.regmovies.com/theaters/4dx
Last edited by Daniel Eagan on Tue Jan 30, 2018 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: FRITZ LANG SILENT BLU BOX from Kino

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 12:18 pm

Ha, there's a theater in the burbs that has 4DX and I thought about getting the kids to try it once. My feeling is, what's fun in a six-minute Disney ride is likely to be intolerable over a two-hour running time, especially given that the type of movie that would do this is intolerable to begin with. So we never did and I kind of forgot it existed, to be honest.

I think this needs to be its own thread now.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 12:53 pm

When I was a teenager we used to spend two weeks in Boston every summer. I would make at least two visits to the Exeter Street Theater. https://www.cinematour.com/tour/us/21977.html
It was a very atmospheric old theater that ran double features of classic films. The first time I went was the Marx Bros. At The Circus and The Big Store. Not the two best, but very cool on the big screen.
As much as I like home theaters, there's nothing like a great presentation of a classic film in a big theater with an appreciative audience.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 1:30 pm

We have a lot of great old theatres in Portland (in fact, I profiled some of the better existing and still-operating ones on my blog a while back). I used to be within walking distance of one, and now I'm in walking distance of another, the Clinton Street Theatre, apparently one of the oldest continually operating cinemas on the West Coast.

As a venue, it's something like a beaten-up old 16mm print of a rare film. All the dents and scratches give it the kind of character only age can impart. The good news is that they've recently started doing a silent film series with live music. The nearby Hollywood Theatre also has a monthly silent film with organ accompaniment, but while the exterior is authentic, the main auditorium is much like that of the Egyptian on Hollywood Blvd - essentially a new structure constructed inside an old one, so the historic atmosphere is elusive. The Clinton is more redolent of the authentic small-town silent filmgoing experience, right down to the vaudeville stage that's still in place.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 1:45 pm

Before I over-romanticize the old version of the Thalia, let me point out the theatre was on a hill and had been carved out of the basement of something known as the Symphony Space (which was there before Richard took over the lease on the Thalia, but not the lease on the Symphony Space). Thus, the Thalia had floor-to-ceiling pillars holding up the floor of the Symphony Space (which had originally been a skating rink, according to the lore of the place, and had NO rake). Those Thalia pillars blocked the view of the inordinately large screen (a CinemaScope-capable one) if you had the bad judgment to sit behind one of those poles -- going back a number of rows, or there were no other seats left.

For major-league bills at Richard's Thalia, I used to bring packing tape and block off my pair of seats in-advance, so my lady and I would get a good view of the screen. The place was never intended for use as a movie theatre at the time the building was constructed (besides, it was only a block from the old Fox Riviera and Fox Riverside -- one of which was claimed to have some 5,000 seats when constructed in the late 1920s).

But the Thalia was one of those intimate gems with a relatively-huge screen and superb sound, and the best projection this side of MoMA's theatres. Richard cared about the film-going experience of his audience and spent no end of money on securing the best prints he could, although sometimes he had the only known print and made do.

At one time or another, Dan Talbot ran The New Yorker nearby, and the Metro, also nearby. The Metro, in fact, has been gutted but sits idle, waiting for an exhibitor who cares about exhibition to lease or buy it. A few years ago, it was supposedly going to become an Alamo Drafthouse location but that deal purportedly fell through. In this neighborhood, where I still live, we need a film theatre (not a warehouse or shooting-gallery that shows TV-quality images on a slightly larger screen than I have in my apartment. When I moved here over 40 years ago, we had seven screens within a one-mile walk, all on Broadway (except for The Thalia). One theatre showed Spanish-language films (next to a converted Horn & Hardart Automat -- the exterior of which is now landmarked though I know not why; it is not recognizable).

Ken
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 7:01 pm

To offer the other side...

I've been to the Orpheum in downtown LA to see Phantom of the Opera with organ accompaniment by Korla Pandit and Mary Philbin in attendance. I've seen animation screenings and classic features at the LA County Museum of Art. I've been to the Silent Movie theater on Fairfax, all of the movie palaces in Hollywood and most of them on Broadway. As a kid, I went to the Alex Theater in Glendale at least once a month. All of these are great experiences.

However when it comes to seeing a film in optimal conditions, the best I've seen is the Roy Disney Theater at the Disney lot. It's a state of the art digital theater with incredible image and sound quality. Not a bad seat in the house... not even a mediocre one. I saw Incredibles there when it came out and the presentation of the film blew my mind. I resolved to find a way to get something like that myself.

I bought a house a few years back, and one of the primary features that I was looking for was a room that would make a good theater. I found a perfect house with a perfect room and built a perfect theater. Digital video technology has gotten to the point where it isn't horribly expensive to have first class digital projection in the home. I designed a sound system and installed a projector and loaded up on blu-rays.

The advantage of blu-rays is that every one is as absolutely perfect as it can be. I have blu-rays of movies that I've seen projected from film, and the blu-rays generally are cleaner, have better contrast, and better sound. Many of them are from original camera negatives, so they look better than any film print. No speckles. No reel change marks. No gate weave. No density shifts. Beautiful pristine images.

I can watch a movie whenever I want. I can invite my friends over and fill the room with an audience. I can eat or drink anything I want... not just overpriced junk food. I can get up to go to the bathroom and pause the film till I get back! No parking fee, no ticket price, no driving to or from... better picture and sound than any theater I know of in LA... thousands of titles to choose from, and if I buy them I *own* them.

I'll go out for a special appearance of a celebrity or to see something really special that isn't on DVD or blu-ray. But I doubt I'll ever just "go to the movies" again. All of my friends feel the same... they come over to my house every weekend and we have dinner, visit then screen a movie- all at my house. That is golden.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Jan 30, 2018 9:47 pm

Bigshot, I read you loud-and-clear. And at this point in my life, if I had the room, the money and the expertise... I'd double-lock my door and let only one other person in. But that issue is moot.

You posted:

...All of my friends feel the same... they come over to my house every weekend and we have dinner, visit then screen a movie- all at my house. That is golden...

Seems to me you're, in your own style, in the movie exhibition business, except instead of selling tickets to your auditorium, you limit your patrons to your friends. You're still, in your newer way, running a movie-and-dinner theatre that has a discerning clientele.

My very best wishes on your method of watching movies.

Alas, I'm fading out as the evening, here in the East, progresses, and what's left of my old brain is turning off. Tomorrow, I'd like to make a few points about the fact you have to wait for the movies you see to be released on Blu-ray. At the Thalia, Richard, (and perhaps other exhibitors at other revival houses) at times unannounced to the public, changed his announced program, after tipping off his friends, and showed prints that few people on this planet knew still existed or existed outside of the locked vaults of Hollywoodland.

You can't buy those films on Amazon. Sometimes, people expecting what was on the schedule. asked for their money back, after an announcement was made that the bill-of-fare had changed, not realizing what they were going to see. And he willingly refunded their admissions. It wasn't my business, so I kept quiet, all the while wanting to shout, "Schmuck, you have no idea what you're about to see here if you just have faith and choose to stay."

Maybe those are days that will never return, since he feared no studio lawyers armed with court orders or Federal marshals coming by to seize prints, and I'll hopefully recount a recollection about that soon. Among other things, I have to talk to a still very-much-alive member of his family, who is an ol' pal, about that.

Ken
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 1:13 am

Actually I'm the head of a non-profit educational organization for film makers, and my house is the headquarters. Saturday and Sunday afternoons are our volunteer hours. If someone comes and volunteers, they're invited for dinner and a screening in the evening. It's become like a salon for young artists who are interested in expanding their horizons. It keeps me young too!

As a non-profit, we have a wide latitude for fair use. I screen things you can't see anywhere else from our organization's collection. But I have rules... the film is never announced in advanced, and no one knows what it is until the lights go down. No complaints about those rules at all. Afterwards, we spend an hour or so talking about what we saw. Works really well.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 7:56 am

I rarely go to the movies lately (I have a nice home theater), but twice I've been to MOMA in NYC the past two years for special events--the restored King of Jazz and a program of little seen Universal shorts from the '30s. They have helped restore to me the long lost experience of moviegoing as an exciting time. The projection is perfect, and the audience especially is the kind of audience seemingly rare nowadays--quiet, respectful though responsive, no stupid texting, and a core knowledge and appreciation of film history.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 9:34 am

I recall the glory days of NYC revival houses well...

From the high end of the Thalia, to the 16mm back projection at Theatre 80, and with the Metro, Hollywood Twin, Regency, the Bleecker and the Little Carnegie in between.

I can't imagine this particular toothpaste going back in the tube again, though.

-Craig
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 11:27 am

If I was just going to break it down to numbers, I've certainly seen more amazing movies in the past six or seven years in my home theater than I saw in movie theaters in the previous fifty years. Before that, most of my experience with classic movies was on TV.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 12:00 pm

It seems that when composing a post to be uploaded, if someone else is also posting at that time in the same thread, my post will disappear into thin air when I try to upload it.

Just finished writing a long one, and now it's gone. Next time I'll copy it before I try to post it (and yes, I was signed in; must be an anomaly of the software here.

The prospective post included some applause for Bigshot and a recollection that Lowell Thomas and Merian C. Cooper both broke into the movies business by filming their own pictures in far-off lands and then lugging prints and 16 MM silent-films projectors to meeting centers where they were paid to lecture while they projected their films onto bedsheets or walls. If ya want to be an revival-house exhibitor, ya find a way. Richard Schwarz did not start out as an exhibitor by leasing the Thalia, though, to my knowledge, it was his first successful foray into the exhibition business.

(For a great biography of Cooper, while Mark Cotta Vaz's "Living Dangerously: The Adventures of Merian C. Cooper, Creator of King Kong" has gone out of print, used copies have been readily and cheaply available from online merchants via Amazon and elsewhere.

I need to get off my butt now and go do some exercise indoors because it's too damn cold to go out walking in this hill-country part of Manhattan (the wind-chill was below zero here earlier today, which to Chicago residents, must make me a wuss given what they live through) where various revival houses used to be, and now we are plagued by $6,000-plus a-month apartment rents while Broadway is full of empty stores (not kidding).

Ken
Last edited by Ken Viewer on Wed Jan 31, 2018 2:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 1:02 pm

Ken, there is not a problem if you are composing a post at the same time as someone else. However, if you are composing a long post, and it takes a while to write it, the Nitrateville server will time out.

While I hate the fact that there are almost no vintage theaters left in the Dallas area, I do visit the usual theater chains almost monthly, and the presentation in the north Dallas area is always excellent. I saw Dunkirk in 70mm at a Cinemark theater and the picture and sound were outstanding. Of course, just about every other film that I see at a theater chain is a DCP, not film. I patronize the Alamo Drafthouse, Cinemark, AMC, Look Cinemas, Studio Movie Grill, and the Angelika (indie films). I do get annoyed when the waiters at the dinner-style theaters bring your check and want you to pay during the films. Other than that, the theaters around here are top notch. (I rarely do the 3D-versions of films -- it's too expensive for the whole family.)

The Texas Theater, south of downtown, has only survived because presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested there and it is an historic building. They have really stepped up the quality of their presentations since a new management group took over the theater a few years ago.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 2:11 pm

I gave up going to the pictures more than half a dozen years ago. This was mainly due to the rotten way they were presented. My last occasion saw the sound disappear a quarter way through and the entire staff as well. Eventually when a posse sent out by the audience finally caught up with one of the 12 year old urchins who were running things, he just popped his head around the corner and said "Youse can all get yer money back if ya want" and that was it.

In my house before the current one, I had a home theatre which seated about 40. There was an annual film festival run each year in the town and I invited the group that ran it to have a look at my theatre thinking they may have wished to utilise it to run a second series of films - such as silents. (I was not all that far from the main venue). Two definitely upward-mobile ladies dressed in purple arrived and basically pooh-poohed the entire set-up - even asking what the organ would be used for!

I have since downsized and moved to a smaller village - but here I have actually met some others interested in film. We have had some film nights at my house and we have organised a film event for the entire town at the local hall. (We may do it again). Currently I am doing renovations on my house which will give me a bigger room in which I can screen films and so have more than three or four people in to watch them.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 2:23 pm

"... if you are composing a long post, and it takes a while to write it, the Nitrateville server will time out..."

Bruce, thanks for the explanation. It takes me a long time to key-in my thoughts without excessively hitting the wrong keys and having to edit all the errors, and that's with touch-typing... From here on out, I'll simply copy my finished, unposted comments before trying to upload them and, if need be, sign in again and then upload them. No big deal and not the board software's problem.

These days, are there film exchanges that distribute silent films and revival-house movies in 35 MM film-format and, if so, do they charge a percentage or a flat fee, if you know?

(No, I'm not considering becoming an exhibitor; I'd rather panhandle Manhattan tourists or use a cowcatcher to move the tourists out of the way so I can get though the mobs of those locusts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (great indoor place to walk for a mile or more in this frigid Manhattan weather).

Ken
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 4:39 pm

Movies that were made to be screened in a theater should be seen in a theater, if you can. The golden age of the revival movie theater in New York was the 1960s and 1970s. Back then, before videotapes and TCM, one wasn’t so concerned about the condition of the films, because any showing of a particular film might be your last opportunity to ever see it. There are still a number of theaters in New York that do revivals, but there are two significant differences between now and then. First, the current theaters are, unlike the old Thalia, mostly nonprofits. Second, programming is now far more built around in-depth surveys of careers, or studios, or countries, or whatever the subject, rather than the screening of the standard classics. If you counted the number of retro titles screened in New York over the past year, I think you’d find that they actually exceeded the number screened during a year of the good old days.

Incidentally, I think the best movie theater in New York, both in terms of sight lines and presentation, is the Walter Reade at Lincoln Center. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing a number of silents there, always with live accompaniment.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 8:03 pm

Ken Viewer wrote:Before I over-romanticize the old version of the Thalia


I visited the Thalia in 1982 and was where I first saw Brief Encounter, it will forever be romanticized for me. Also went to a Garbo/Ingrid Bergman festival at the Regency that fall. I spent 3 fabulous weeks in Manhattan that trip. Fond memories.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostFri Feb 16, 2018 4:59 pm

While the discussion here is mainly about buildings, I have to say that audiences for silent films can be terrible. The amount of inappropriate laughing has spoiled virtually every photoplay drama i have attended. I remind people that all movies should be silent...or at least all audiences.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostFri Feb 16, 2018 5:04 pm

Mmmm.... no. The audience's reaction is part of the experience and while an audience that doesn't get it is bad, sometimes the audience does get that it's bad. In the words of the Bard, "Buzz buzz."

And that shared sigh during great moments.... that you get with a packed house and an accompanist like Stuart Oderman who knew that there are times when he should shut up and let the film carry its own weight...



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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostFri Feb 16, 2018 6:21 pm

I'm always insulted when I go to the movies and they play one of those nagging Shhhh! trailers up front. I know to be quiet. People who babble through movies are going to do it even with the Shhh! trailer.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostSun Feb 18, 2018 11:48 pm

Living in Los Angeles, I can afford to be cavalier, but nothing beats seeing a movie in a theatre, where it was intended to be seen. Watching MAD MAD WORLD by myself at home doesn't even begin to compare to seeing it at the Cinerama Dome, packed to the gills with folks who love it as much as I do. But this goes for even the lowliest B&W B-picture as well; I'll never forget the audience at last year's Cinecon going absolutely bonkers during Sam Fuller's POWER OF THE PRESS. Granted, people who don't have the luxury of living in a big city may not have a choice, but when you do, you should take advantage of the theatrical experience. Nothing beats it.

Mike S.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostMon Feb 19, 2018 2:42 pm

Invite a bunch of friends over. That's what I do. I can fit about 10 people in- the most I've had is almost 20. That's more than enough to have a good time.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostMon Feb 19, 2018 7:53 pm

I attend the Kansas Silent Film Festival every year. They usually show a Keaton/Chaplin/Lloyd feature on Friday night. (This year it is Colleen Moore's Her Wild Oat.) Although I've always already seen these comedies, they are completely different experience when watching them with several hundred people laughing (and live musical accompaniment.).
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Feb 20, 2018 10:22 am

silentfilm wrote:I attend the Kansas Silent Film Festival every year. They usually show a Keaton/Chaplin/Lloyd feature on Friday night. (This year it is Colleen Moore's Her Wild Oat.) Although I've always already seen these comedies, they are completely different experience when watching them with several hundred people laughing (and live musical accompaniment.).


I've not had the pleasure of seeing a silent comedy live with others who love them, I did get to see a couple dramas. Metropolis was nearly ruined by idiots mocking the movie or laughing at some of the effects (why they were there is beyond me.) Sunrise on the other hand had a smaller crowd but was fantastic with the huge screen and being surrounded by other people who enjoy the film.

99.9% of the time when I watch a silent film it's alone. I don't have any friends into silent films and my wife can only take so many of them. The toddler at home isn't a lost cause just yet but we'll see when she gets older. Seeing one in a theatrical experience is great for me because it's a reminder that I'm not the only one out there who likes this stuff, because let's face it: it's not exactly a mainstream hobby.
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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Feb 20, 2018 10:48 am

I suppose it's time to make a plug for the remaining old movie festivals. I read alt.movies.silent for years, and read people talking about going to these festivals, yet it was years before I said to myself, "Self, you could go to those too!" So I drove to Columbus and attended a Cinevent, then the next year flew to Akron and drove down to Cinesation in Massillon. (Cinesation is now gone, so instead my other choice is Capitolfest in Rome, New York. Ironically, I've never been to the Kansas one, despite being from Kansas.)

What I found in both cases was a long weekend devoted to a wide range of rare films, at a shockingly cheap price (the festivals themselves were always dirt cheap, the hotel was the biggest expense-- and hotels in small towns in Ohio are not exactly expensive). But more than that I found a community already there that with a little effort I could get into. By now I recognize faces and have old friends at these things (a lot of the same people turn up at multiple fests). Yes, this may not be a mainstream hobby but when you're with a couple of hundred others who also have it, it certainly feels like a shared one.

Anyway, my point is, it's achievable, and as far as knowing anybody goes, if I'm there introduce yourself and I'll make sure you meet others, get invited to dinner en masse, etc. I agree with everyone in this thread— I love my home theater, but there's nothing like seeing movies with a crowd of fellow enthusiasts. These festivals are your chance.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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bigshot

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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Feb 20, 2018 10:55 am

Maybe the problem isn't the quality of the screening facilities, it's the quality of the friends! I'm a film maker, so a lot of my friends are film makers, artists and musicians. I guess that helps. I very rarely watch a movie alone. That would be a drag because you wouldn't have anyone to talk with about it afterwards.
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Battra92

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Re: The quality of repertory showings and home theaters

PostTue Feb 20, 2018 12:39 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:Anyway, my point is, it's achievable


For some but I don't really have the luxury of taking a few days off of work, leaving my kid with family and heading across the country to watch some movies.

bigshot wrote: I very rarely watch a movie alone. That would be a drag because you wouldn't have anyone to talk with about it afterwards.


Tell me about it.
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