Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

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radiotelefonia

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Re: More missing bits on the Keystone films

PostTue Nov 30, 2010 11:05 pm

martin arias wrote:I'VE NOTICED THE FOLLOWING:

1) tHERE ARE A COUPLE OF JUMPS AT THE END OF "MY TRYSTING PLACES" WHICH ARE PRESENT ON W.H. PRODUCTIONS COPIES, INCLUDING THE FINAL KISS OF CHARLIE AND MABEL, AND MACK SWAIN SITTING BACK WITH HIS WIFE.

2) THERE ARE MISSING SCENES ON "HIS NEW PROFESSION" ALSO PRESENT ON W.H. PRODUCTIONS COPIES: A COMPLETE SCENE OF CHARLIE AT THE BAR WITH A GAG ON DRINKS FROM WHICH JUST A SMALL FRAGMENT IS PRESENT ON THE CAK VERSION /ALSO A HALF THE SEQUENCE OF CHAPLIN PUSHING THE WHEELCHAIR INTO THE BAR'S ENTRANCE / AND THE FINAL SCENE WITH CHARLIE AND THE GIRL, WHICH IS MISSING FROM CAK.

3) THE FINAL SHOT OF CHESTER CONKLIN FALLING AFTER BEING HIT BY CHARLIE WITH THE MALLET AT THE END OF REEL ONE OF "CAUGHT IN A CABARET" IS MISSING ON CAK BUT PRESENT ON MANY LOW QUALITY DVD COPIES.

TO THOSE YOU HAVE TO ADD THE ALREADY MENTIONED SMALL FRAGMENTS MISSING FROM "THOSE LOVE PANGS" AND "LAUGHING GAS" (THE BEGINNINGS) AND THE BAD PRINT ON "RECREATION" (I KNOW A FINE 35 MM COPY EXISTS AT THE CINEMATECA HEBRAICA IN BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA. I'VE SEEN IT PROJECTED ON A MOVIE THEATER THERE SOME 20 YEARS AGO, AND IT WAS USED WHEN A CHAPLIN TV SHOW WAS AIRED THERE IN THE 1990'S).

MARTIN


Fundación Cinemateca Argentina
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Village Voice 12/1 by J. Hoberman

PostTue Nov 30, 2010 11:21 pm

http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-12-01/ ... verything/
What to Buy the Movie Buff Who Has Everything?
By J. Hoberman Wednesday, Dec 1 2010
The old year ends and, repackaged for holiday gifting, some things seem absolutely new. The fruit of an eight-year, international restoration effort, Flicker Alley’s four-disc box set Chaplin at Keystone is a major work of cultural rehabilitation. Charlie Chaplin’s first movies—the 33 one- or two-reel comedies and the single feature he made for Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studios in 1914—are uncanny in their immediacy. The only thing more brilliant than the print quality is the magnitude of the young Chaplin’s scurrilous charisma. The box comes with a helpful booklet and several short documentaries, but the greatest bonus is the frequent appearance of Mabel Normand, Keystone’s reigning star as well as a performer whose physical grace and appealing good nature made her a wonderful foil for the Little Tramp.

(Someone who looks at the donut and not at the hole)
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Re: Village Voice 12/1 by J. Hoberman

PostWed Dec 01, 2010 4:15 am

DShepFilm wrote:http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-12-01/film/what-to-buy-the-movie-buff-who-has-everything/
What to Buy the Movie Buff Who Has Everything?
By J. Hoberman Wednesday, Dec 1 2010
The old year ends and, repackaged for holiday gifting, some things seem absolutely new. The fruit of an eight-year, international restoration effort, Flicker Alley’s four-disc box set Chaplin at Keystone is a major work of cultural rehabilitation. Charlie Chaplin’s first movies—the 33 one- or two-reel comedies and the single feature he made for Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studios in 1914—are uncanny in their immediacy. The only thing more brilliant than the print quality is the magnitude of the young Chaplin’s scurrilous charisma. The box comes with a helpful booklet and several short documentaries, but the greatest bonus is the frequent appearance of Mabel Normand, Keystone’s reigning star as well as a performer whose physical grace and appealing good nature made her a wonderful foil for the Little Tramp.

(Someone who looks at the donut and not at the hole)


Ahh, but this set is so full of holes they're hard to miss, especially in slow motion.

RICHARD M ROBERTS (sorry folks, couldn't resist)
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PostWed Dec 01, 2010 5:34 am

The BFI are releasing the set in the UK, at a shocking price of £15.99

Can't be sure if this is a mistake.. as the pre order price around the same mark on HMV.co.uk and Play.com

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Charlie-Chaplin ... 229&sr=8-1

I've already ordered it.
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PostSat Dec 11, 2010 11:14 pm

Here's a video that Lobster apparently made showing how the picture quality looks (and compares with previous versions). It's in French, so who knows what Frenchy thing it's really saying, but that's what I got from it, anyway.

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/5ZfaFfu1iqY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/5ZfaFfu1iqY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
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PostSun Dec 12, 2010 12:41 am

"In 1914 Charles Chaplin made his film debut, signed by Mack Sennett’s Keystone Film Company. In one year he made 33 short films and one feature-length film in which, little by little, the psychology of his character emerged.

"For these first films, only poor copies seemed to have survived.

"This vast restoration project, conducted with the aid of film archives worldwide, finally allows us to rediscover the first steps of the great Chaplin".

[N.B: no, this isn't a word-by-word translation; it's an attempt to render the French into natural-sounding English phrases--that's why I substituted "this" for the indefinite article "un"/"a" in the last sentence. ;-)]

-Harold
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PostMon Dec 13, 2010 8:37 am

Leonard Maltin on Chaplin at Keystone:

http://blogs.indiewire.com/leonardmalti ... nd_always#
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Re: Village Voice 12/1 by J. Hoberman

PostMon Dec 13, 2010 8:54 am

DShepFilm wrote:http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-12-01/film/what-to-buy-the-movie-buff-who-has-everything/
What to Buy the Movie Buff Who Has Everything?
By J. Hoberman Wednesday, Dec 1 2010
The old year ends and, repackaged for holiday gifting, some things seem absolutely new. The fruit of an eight-year, international restoration effort, Flicker Alley’s four-disc box set Chaplin at Keystone is a major work of cultural rehabilitation. Charlie Chaplin’s first movies—the 33 one- or two-reel comedies and the single feature he made for Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studios in 1914—are uncanny in their immediacy. The only thing more brilliant than the print quality is the magnitude of the young Chaplin’s scurrilous charisma. The box comes with a helpful booklet and several short documentaries, but the greatest bonus is the frequent appearance of Mabel Normand, Keystone’s reigning star as well as a performer whose physical grace and appealing good nature made her a wonderful foil for the Little Tramp.

(Someone who looks at the donut and not at the hole)


Thanks for all the donuts, David! And keep 'em coming!
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PostMon Dec 13, 2010 12:18 pm

http://blogs.indiewire.com/leonardmalti ... and_always

Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy

Chaplin—First, Last, And Always
For me, comedy begins with Charlie Chaplin. I know there were screen comedies before he came along, and I appreciate the work of everyone from Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew to Max Linder. But none of them created a persona as unique or indelible as the Little Tramp, and no one could match his worldwide impact.

The miracle of the “golden dozen” two-reelers he made for Mutual Film Corporation in 1916-17, just a few years after his motion picture debut, remains unmatched almost a century later: twelve perfectly-formed comedies (The Immigrant, Easy Street, The Adventurer, The Cure, et al), filmed one after another, that remain as fresh and funny as the day they were made. (Kevin Brownlow and David Gill’s landmark documentary Unknown Chaplin reveals how much hard work, and trial and error, went into the creation of these films, but of course the effort doesn’t show in the final product.)

Curiously, Chaplin’s earliest work for Mack Sennett’s Keystone Company has been difficult to see, except in scattershot fashion, over the years. What’s more, because no one claimed ownership of the films and most of the original negatives vanished years ago, it has been virtually impossible to find decent copies of many titles from Chaplin’s first, formative year in the movie business.

No one argues that these are great comedies; most of them aren’t. But what if we couldn’t read all of Shakespeare’s plays, or explore Mozart’s lesser compositions? The 35 films Chaplin made at a rapid clip during his initiation-year in motion pictures are essential viewing. They allow us to witness how an experienced, if youthful, comic from England became a self-assured performer in front of the camera—and sowed the seeds that would transform him into an artist.

Now, thanks to a consortium of international archives and private collectors, and the efforts of Serge Bromberg’s LobsterFilm in France, the best existing prints and negatives of all but one short from 1914 have been gathered, examined shot-by-shot, and—

—digitally restored to produce the finest possible copies of his work. Every film is accompanied by a newly-commissioned music score by an all-star array of silent-film accompanists including Robert Israel, Stephen Horne, Rodney Sauer and the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra, and Ken Winokur’s band, to name just a few. The four-disc set, Chaplin at Keystone, released by Flicker Alley, also includes Chaplin’s first feature-film appearance, in Sennett’s Tillie’s Punctured Romance, an early Chaplin cartoon, and even an excerpt from the heretofore-unknown short A Thief Catcher (recently discovered by Paul Gierucki of Laughsmith Entertainment) in which Charlie plays a Keystone Kop. John Bengtson does his usual fine detective work in tracking down Los Angeles locations where these films were shot, while an accompanying booklet includes documentation on the films, an essay by Jeffrey Vance about Chaplin’s work at Keystone, and some rare photos.

Some of the prints look great, and others merely adequate, but on the whole they are far superior to anything we’ve seen before—in 8mm, 16mm, or 35mm. Original main titles and intertitles have been painstakingly recreated from the most reliable sources.

Of course, the films themselves remain a mixed bag. Charlie’s first film, Making a Living, is actually quite enjoyable, although he plays a dandy, and not his familiar Tramp. Subsequent films in the chronology reveal his first appearances as the character who would achieve almost-instantaneous fame around the globe. But while the externals fall into place pretty quickly, this is not the little fellow we know and love: he’s crass and crude. It’s fascinating to see what bits of physical shtick Charlie brought with him from the Music Hall and which now-familiar mannerisms evolved over time. It is also interesting to see how the newcomer to Hollywood worked with his fellow clowns (Ford Sterling, Chester Conklin, the endearing Mabel Normand, the engaging Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, et al). We also get to see how Charlie develops as a director in these primitive, knockabout farces.

Kicking seems to be the primary activity in most Keystone shorts: kicking people in the rear, in the stomach, almost anywhere on the body so long as it registers anger or annoyance and causes the other person to fall down. Bit by bit, Chaplin manages to carve out his own brand of humor, and every now and then, he injects a piece of pantomime that is distinctively his own.

The Keystones almost never make me laugh, but I can’t stop watching them, looking for signs of the Chaplin-to-come. That is their heritage, and for that reason they are priceless.


If the Sennett oeuvre is Chaplin in embryonic form, Modern Times (1936) shows him at the peak of his powers. It is one of the greatest comedies ever made. I fell in love with it at the age of eight and my mother took me to see it when it was re-released theatrically.

I’ve owned Modern Times in more formats and versions than I can count, including a fine laserdisc produced by David Shepard and two previous DVD releases. Even so, I would recommend the new two-disc set from Criterion, not so much for the picture and sound (which were already fine, but look and sound even better) but for the generous number of superior bonus features. Chaplin chronicler Jeffrey Vance narrates an excellent background piece on the making of the picture, illustrated by rare photos from the Chaplin archives. John Bengtson has outdone himself with a piece about the locations where the film was shot that, also provides a thoughtful picture of a young, growing Los Angeles. Oscar-winning filmmakers and film buffs Craig Barron and Ben Burtt (who most recently hosted a behind-the-scenes look at Tarzan for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) focus on Chaplin’s use of visual and aural effects, a little-remarked-upon aspect of his work as a director. You’ll learn some fascinating tidbits.

Chaplin biographer David Robinson is heard on a commentary track, while that wonderful raconteur David Raksin tells of his experiences working with Charlie on the music for Modern Times. (This interview first appeared on the 1992 laserdisc.) Alistair Cooke’s home movie of Chaplin and Paulette Goddard on an ocean voyage aboard Charlie’s yacht—some of which was used on the most recent DVD release of Richard Attenborough’s Chaplin—is shown in its entirety, with a Donald Sosin piano score and an interview with Cooke’s daughter. There is also a Cuban short subject, For the First Time (1967), about an audience’s initial encounter with Modern Times, and a charming documentary about the context and impact of the picture featuring the gifted Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, which appeared on the Warner Home Video release of the Chaplin comedy. Finally, Criterion has included David Shepard’s restoration of the great 1916 two-reeler The Rink (with an orchestral score by Carl Davis) which spotlights the same roller-skating prowess Charlie displays in a famous scene in Modern Times.

As usual there is also a handsome booklet with original essays about Chaplin, including a piece by Lisa Stein that excerpts the magazine articles he wrote during his global tour in the early 1930s called “A Comedian Sees the World.”

If you want to lift your spirits, and do a lifelong favor for a young person you care about, watch Modern Times together.
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PostMon Dec 13, 2010 3:58 pm

Not to open a can of worms again, but it's interesting that there is praise for
Criterion's use of David Shepard's restoration of THE RINK but his excellent
version of MODERN TIMES is not considered.

Did anyone else notice the swastikas on the slate in that clip from Lobster Films..?
" You can't take life too seriously...you'll never get out of it alive."


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PostThu Dec 16, 2010 3:45 pm

My R2 (PAL) copy of Chaplin At Keystone seemingly has a fault on Disc 1; Twenty Minutes Of Love only plays the first 5 minutes and then cuts back to the menu. In fact I've played it on 3 seperate players now and it happens on them all. Anybody else noticed this or is it just me? (I got it from HMV.com by the way - athough confusingly it still shows as 'pre-order' on the bfi website?!!) Confused.
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PostMon Dec 20, 2010 5:34 pm

traccy wrote:My R2 (PAL) copy of Chaplin At Keystone seemingly has a fault on Disc 1; Twenty Minutes Of Love only plays the first 5 minutes and then cuts back to the menu. In fact I've played it on 3 seperate players now and it happens on them all. Anybody else noticed this or is it just me? (I got it from HMV.com by the way - athough confusingly it still shows as 'pre-order' on the bfi website?!!) Confused.


I haven't noticed any problems on Disc 1. Will check again and will get back to you.
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PostMon Dec 20, 2010 6:36 pm

I've communicated with someone by e-mail whose copy has the same fault.
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PostFri Apr 15, 2011 8:34 pm

traccy wrote:My R2 (PAL) copy of Chaplin At Keystone seemingly has a fault on Disc 1; Twenty Minutes Of Love only plays the first 5 minutes and then cuts back to the menu. In fact I've played it on 3 seperate players now and it happens on them all. Anybody else noticed this or is it just me? (I got it from HMV.com by the way - athough confusingly it still shows as 'pre-order' on the bfi website?!!) Confused.


There's a reason why Twenty Minutes of Love cuts abruptly at 5:21 seconds: It was mastered that way. I took a look at the DVD in DVD Shrink and Title 26 and 26 (continued) are 10:40 but Title 27 is 5:21 instead of 10:40. So if you go to the Menu and "Select All" no problem. However, if you "Select Film" it will always finish abruptly.
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PostSat Apr 16, 2011 1:22 am

A corrected pressing of the BFI disc one can be obtained free of charge by contacting [email protected]. I received mine within a few days and it works perfectly now when choosing "Select Film".

I don't know if this free replacement would be available to buyers outside the UK, but it's certainly worth asking Ben. I did not have to return the defective original.
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PostMon Apr 18, 2011 3:07 pm

Yes they will without fanfare.
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Chaplin at Keystone

PostWed Apr 27, 2011 8:08 pm

Thurs April 28 2011 AM. I just received my replacement for the BFI Chaplin at Keystone. Great service, something that Flicker Alley could learn when they want money to replace a faulty disc because ''it was a bigger problem than they thought" or some such. The set did not have to be bought from the BFI either in the first place and I have notified Ben that I have it, less than 10 days after his shipping date to me.
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Restoration decisions about Chaplin Keystone

PostWed Apr 27, 2011 9:04 pm

Hi everyone, I'm new in this forum.

Well... if you allow me I have some information to share with you about the Chaplin at Keystone set.

As I remamber from a video and some texts from BFI, before the restoration project was completed, the initial intention was to only use 35mm full frame footage in the restoration project, even if this mean to left entire scenes out that survived only in 16mm.

Clearly they changed mind, since some titles only survied in 16mm, or was only know to survie in such form at the time of the restoration, and some tiltes have too long missing scenes. But some not important scenes was still left out as the surviving footage was way too poor. So when some of you acuse David Shepard of left out some scenes present in other DVDs, it's not a mistake of hin, but a decision the restoration team took, as they didn't wanted to disrupt attention of the viewer.

Another decision they made about avoid as much disruption as possible, in terms of image quality. In other words, if a scene was 100% complete in a soft and a bit dark 35mm footage, and only 80% present in a sharp & clear fine dynamic range 35mm fotoage, they would use only the soft dark 35mm footage, instead of piece together the shorter good quality footage with the poor quality long footage.

They olny jump from one footage to another in the middle of a scene if there was no complete scene in a single footage source, or in the case of missing frames for the digitally remastered episodes, for include the missing frames using another footage source, as they tried to align frame geometry, size and contrast by digital tools.

I disagree some of these decisions, but I do respect, and I'm sure they are wise to still archive safety fine grains of the higher quality material, even if not used in the final edition of the restored titles.
There was a video on web showing a restorer in a film edition table, showing the three distint footage of a titles, explaning all that.


The BFI site have information about the titles they restored, as BFI was part of the Chaplin Keystone restoraion project. Between Showers(1914) have a very good print, shot from original camera negative, but in general most scenes was less complete than a slight inferior print. So...

http://chaplin.bfi.org.uk/restoring/bfi/4-keystone.html

I bet many scenes from many titles in the KeystoneDVD collection have greater quality in some unused footage, in case it was shorter than some lower quality footage.

I'm sure technology will keep progressing, and will reach the point of some day be able to add details back, and with time maybe it became afordable for short.
Even in the present day there is a technology that could help reduce a lot the jump in image quality from a good 35mm to a bit bad 35mm. Lowry Digital images have a image detail enhancement technology that recover some details by getting the information left by grain in a couple of frames, since grain is random and couple of frames can hold more details than just one.
Unfortunately this is very expansive, out of any early silent film's restoration budget. They use more than 1500 Mac computers to process the data.
Last edited by All Darc on Wed Apr 27, 2011 9:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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PostWed Apr 27, 2011 9:16 pm

Another thing...

Does anybody have a list of all the archives, collectors and film institutes they contacted during footage search for the Chaplin Keystone Restoration Project ?

There is a brazilian collector with a lot of material, with almost all Chaplin films, in 16mm and 8,5mm films.

His name is Lula Cardoso Ayres from the Instituto Cultural Lula Cardoso Ayres (Cultural institute Lula Cardoso Ayres).
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PostTue May 03, 2011 6:21 am

Thank you for your post, All Darc.

I wrote to Bryony Dixon at the BFI after the American set came out, hoping the atrocious quality of "Recreation" could be improved for the BFI DVD (sadly, they couldn't change the master).

My problem with their "restoration" is that their use of 16mm seems quite arbitrary. It's one thing to say: "Well, we're only using 35mm!" but what they've REALLY done is say "we're only using 35mm!" to excuse the absence of shots surviving only in 16mm... and then plugged in a bunch of shots from 16mm ANYWAY (and even 8mm, in the case of "Recreation"!).

In other words – when push came to shove, they clearly didn't follow their own "35mm only!" edict... so why didn't they just follow that through and hunt up ALL the 16mm footage possible, and do the thing right?
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PostSat May 07, 2011 12:51 pm

Thank you, Doug.

Do you have a list of all archives and film collectors consulted for this Keystone Restoration Project ?

There is a collector on Brazil with a lot of film material, 75 Chaplin's films and all Buster Keaton films, 100 Mack Sennett films...
He have the largest know collection of french comedian Max Linder.

Most of his collection it's 16mm and 8mm, but perhaps he have some scene that is longer, or some scene that is considered missing, or some better 16mm footage than the used in the Keystone restoration.

His name is Luiz Cardoso Ayres, and he direct the Lula Cardoso Ayres Institute.

The restoration it's more than DVD, and thy will upate the restoration (or preserve new footage) even than do not adapt to a new DVD.

Doug Sulpy wrote:Thank you for your post, All Darc.

I wrote to Bryony Dixon at the BFI after the American set came out, hoping the atrocious quality of "Recreation" could be improved for the BFI DVD (sadly, they couldn't change the master).

My problem with their "restoration" is that their use of 16mm seems quite arbitrary. It's one thing to say: "Well, we're only using 35mm!" but what they've REALLY done is say "we're only using 35mm!" to excuse the absence of shots surviving only in 16mm... and then plugged in a bunch of shots from 16mm ANYWAY (and even 8mm, in the case of "Recreation"!).

In other words – when push came to shove, they clearly didn't follow their own "35mm only!" edict... so why didn't they just follow that through and hunt up ALL the 16mm footage possible, and do the thing right?
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PostSun May 08, 2011 7:00 am

All Darc wrote:Thank you, Doug.

Do you have a list of all archives and film collectors consulted for this Keystone Restoration Project ?


This isn't exhaustive, but for some of the films the sources are listed here:

http://chaplin.bfi.org.uk/restoring/bfi/
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PostSun May 08, 2011 11:10 am

I believe the sources are also listed in the booklet that came with the set.
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PostSun May 08, 2011 11:43 am

Thank you Rodney. But I already had look all the BFI information beore. Not much deep details.

Someone in this forum said to have a much better print, a 16mm, that looks much better than he 8mm used in the restoration of Recreation. There was also some report about a 35mm print on Argentine.

Does anybody knows if BFI get interest in check these prints ???


With all respect for film archives and Chaplin Familly, but I have to ask this:

Why didn't they had the effort to restore Chaplin Keystone films 25 years ago ???


TV should talk more about old prints in garage. I bet many people have prints somewhere but don't think it's important. A TV news should say sometimes to people contact a filmmuseum if they have a old print.
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PostMon May 09, 2011 8:13 am

I got a response from BFI, whenn I asked if they consulted a bazilian film collector:

"Hi,

I'm not sure if we consulted this collector - but I haven't heard the name before so I doubt it. We only sourced 35mm material - principally from the FIAF archives. Are these prints on 35mm - are they original - it would be useful to know for the future but unless the material is of outstanding quality it is unlikely that the archives could return to the project in the near future.

thanks for the information"


Maybe this explain why they had not always the best sources in cases a scene or a a title was not available in 35mm. The 16mm probably got not much attention.
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Re: Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

PostSat Feb 04, 2017 1:48 pm

So is this out-of-print now? I kept putting this on the back burner time and time again and finally looked at purchasing it the other day and it's out of stock everywhere. Bummer.
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Re: Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

PostSun Feb 05, 2017 11:18 am

Stonesfan wrote:So is this out-of-print now? I kept putting this on the back burner time and time again and finally looked at purchasing it the other day and it's out of stock everywhere. Bummer.


Have you tried at the Flicker Alley web site?
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Re: Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

PostSun Feb 05, 2017 5:42 pm

Flicker Alley lists it as out of stock as well.

It came out just before the blu-ray market really developed, so my guess would be a reissue in blu and DVD is somewhere in the offing in the future, though obviously the situation for David Shepard releases is uncertain at the moment.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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Battra92

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Re: Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

PostTue Feb 14, 2017 2:40 pm

The UK version still seems to be in stock, though it looks like that too might be OOP.
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FlickerAlley

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Re: Chaplin at Keystone from Flicker Alley

PostWed Feb 15, 2017 5:54 pm

Stonesfan wrote:So is this out-of-print now? I kept putting this on the back burner time and time again and finally looked at purchasing it the other day and it's out of stock everywhere. Bummer.


Hi Stonesfan,

We are in the midst of reprinting this title, as well as Chaplin's Mutual Comedies. Please check http://www.flickeralley.com again in a few weeks. Thanks for your patience and support!
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