A fragment of a Vitaphone disc recoring

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radiotelefonia

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A fragment of a Vitaphone disc recoring

PostMon Aug 24, 2009 9:23 pm

I have been asked to clean and repair a fragment of a Vitaphone soundtrack. And here are the results.

This is a fragment from WHY BE GOOD and the theme is called "The song of the Boulevards":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb2Lq_R5KMc
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FrankFay

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Re: A fragment of a Vitaphone disc recoring

PostTue Aug 25, 2009 2:22 pm

radiotelefonia wrote:I have been asked to clean and repair a fragment of a Vitaphone soundtrack. And here are the results.

This is a fragment from WHY BE GOOD and the theme is called "The song of the Boulevards":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb2Lq_R5KMc


It's by J. S. Zamecnik and published as "Le chant des boulevards" although I'm just being picky.
Eric Stott
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vitaphone

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PostTue Aug 25, 2009 4:34 pm

If have the full set of discs for WHY BE GOOD? It is loaded with hot dance and jazz tunes with Jimmy Dorsey, Phil Napoleon, Eddie Lang and other jazz greats confirmed. The nitrate is in Italy and we hope this will soon be restored. SYNTHETIC SIN, Moore's immediately previous silent feature also with Vitaphone score, also has its nitrate there. 3 discs survive.
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radiotelefonia

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Re: A fragment of a Vitaphone disc recoring

PostTue Aug 25, 2009 6:24 pm

FrankFay wrote:
radiotelefonia wrote:I have been asked to clean and repair a fragment of a Vitaphone soundtrack. And here are the results.

This is a fragment from WHY BE GOOD and the theme is called "The song of the Boulevards":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb2Lq_R5KMc


It's by J. S. Zamecnik and published as "Le chant des boulevards" although I'm just being picky.


That's fine with me. I'm more at home with tangos, but I'm still happy repairing recordings.

The person that we need here is my friend Héctor Lorenzo Lucci who had to create a Vitaphone turntable, almost from scratch, in order to restore the soundtrack of the MOSAICO CRIOLLO films that the Ducros Hicken Museum has published on DVD (I captured the broadcast of them last week). He also had the films themselves.

The funny thing, which is not known, as he told me is that once that the films were restored, they returned the original elements back to him, because he was (and is) able to preserve them in a much better way than the industry itself!

Lucci is terrific in order to physically rescue records that are almost doomed to be lost.

In my case, however, I always worked to at least recover the original sounds of those discs. and we have a kind relationship through todotango and I always miss him, he enjoys what I try to do:

http://www.todotango.com/english/biblio ... ovsgra.asp

http://www.todotango.com/english/biblio ... errito.asp

http://www.todotango.com/english/biblio ... emania.asp

http://www.todotango.com/english/biblio ... enario.asp

http://www.todotango.com/english/biblio ... tlanta.asp
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Rodney

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Re: A fragment of a Vitaphone disc recoring

PostThu Aug 27, 2009 6:54 am

radiotelefonia wrote:I have been asked to clean and repair a fragment of a Vitaphone soundtrack. And here are the results.

This is a fragment from WHY BE GOOD and the theme is called "The song of the Boulevards":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb2Lq_R5KMc


Zamecnik wasn't French, so I expect he called it "Le Chant des Boulevards" just to make it seem exotic and cultured. "The Song of the Boulevards" is, of course, a fine translation. This is a very useful Zamecnik cue, published by Sam Fox in 1922. We've used it for a few film scores (it shows up towards the end of "Cobra"), and also on our "Cinema" CD. We usually play it in a much more rhythmic way. I've never heard this version before, so thanks much for putting that up.

There's a lot of harp in this arrangement. I've seen harps in photos of silent film orchestras, but we've never actually found a dedicated harp part in any of the arrangements, so I suspect they were reading from piano parts. I think it's in Erno Rapee's book that he recommends getting a harpist who can double on piano.

By the time of the talkies and this recording, of course, someone may have rearranged this music for whatever studio orchestra was playing that day.
Rodney Sauer
The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra
www.mont-alto.com
"Let the Music do the Talking!"
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boblipton

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PostThu Aug 27, 2009 7:26 am

Just a note that this, for me, is one of the reasons I love Nitrateville: listening to the people who actually do the work talk about the details in a straightforward fashion helps me understand what is going on.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
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Jack Theakston

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PostThu Sep 03, 2009 11:17 am

My experience has been that the studio recordings are almost always re-arrangements by one of the staff composers when compared to the original charts.

Harp parts were published by some outfits (Schirmers for one, I believe), but I've never seen them myself. Saxophone, English Horn and 3rd Trombone were also included in the "additional" parts.
J. Theakston
"You get more out of life when you go out to a movie!"

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