RAMONA (1928) Sing Along

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bobfells

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RAMONA (1928) Sing Along

PostSun Feb 20, 2011 12:33 pm

I am missing the third of the four glass slides but the images are great:

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That's Dolores del Rio and Roland Drew.
Last edited by bobfells on Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Gagman 66

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PostSun Feb 20, 2011 10:13 pm

bobfells,

:D Great stuff, but her name is Dolores, not Delores. Is this film in that Czech Archive or not. It was listed as being part of the collection 10 years ago. Is it still there? Does anyone know? How come the library of Congress doesn't see this film as a priority in at least the same league as the stuff that was sent home from Gosfilmofond? It was a huge hit! :? Would love to see this movie.

I have a whole bunch of versions of the song.
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Brooksie

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 4:00 am

Do you know what was the precise purpose of these? Did they actually hold singalongs, or were they designed to illustrate a song as it was being played?

There's quite a sweet version of Del Rio herself singing it available online - http://www.archive.org/details/DoloresDelRio-Ramona1928.
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bobfells

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 8:05 am

I'll defer to the professional musicians at N'ville for a precise answer to Brooksie's question but my understanding is that these slides were shown in movie theaters with accompaniment by whoever provided the music for the films. I don't know if the slides were shown in conjunction with the film itself or as a promotion to see the film. My guess is the latter.

The slides are numbered so the projectionist need not know the song to screen them in their proper order. The "Ramona" slides are from a series called "Art Melody Slides" manufactured by Standard Slide Corp. NY. Same source for the LILAC TIME song. The Jolson slides I've posted (and there's more to come-be warned!) are called "Song-Hit Slides" by Maurice Workstel, Inc., 151 West 46th St., N.Y. There are no copyright notices on any of the slides.
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Rodney

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 8:13 am

Gagman 66 wrote:bobfells,

:D Great stuff, but her name is Dolores, not Delores. Is this film in that Czech Archive or not. It was listed as being part of the collection 10 years ago. Is it still there? Does anyone know? How come the library of Congress doesn't see this film as a priority in at least the same league as the stuff that was sent home from Gosfilmofond? It was a huge hit! :? Would love to see this movie.

I have a whole bunch of versions of the song.


I've never seen it listed as part of any archive, Czech or otherwise, and I'd be very glad to hear of any news if it was. I'm sure the Library of Congress would be interested, so please don't criticize them for not making an effort to obtain a nonexistent print.

It was probably a very interesting film. With a nice title song. (The earlier Mary Pickford version of the story survives and is available on DVD.)

We played at the Stanley Theater in Utica New York several years ago, a theater that originally opened with Ramona, and we looked in vain for surviving prints at that time. I found several orchestral arrangements for the song (it was quite popular), and we performed one with a pair of local singers, then showed a different film. It would have been great to have these slides so that the audience could sing along during the chorus!
Rodney Sauer
The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra
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"Let the Music do the Talking!"
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Gagman 66

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 11:39 am

Rodney,

:? RAMONA was on a big list of movies in some Czech Archive from 2000 or 2001. This was linked right here on this board, a couple years back. Hopefully, somebody here knows what I am talking about? I know that I am correct, because it surprised the heck out of me at the time. I don't recall the name of the Czech archive. No information was given, other than it saying RAMONA '28.
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Jack Theakston

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 2:18 pm

I'll defer to the professional musicians at N'ville for a precise answer to Brooksie's question but my understanding is that these slides were shown in movie theaters with accompaniment by whoever provided the music for the films. I don't know if the slides were shown in conjunction with the film itself or as a promotion to see the film. My guess is the latter.


Correct. Illustrated Song were most popular during the nickelodeon era commencing around 1903, and hit their apex in 1912, when the sheet music industry started to collapse—featured songs would be sold in the lobby. During that period, there would be a pianist and a singer, who would sing the song and then get the audience to join in on a verse. (Incidentally, recent evidence points to the fact that during this period, popular opinion among the nickelodeons was that films were used as a break for the pianist and were not accompanied.)

Glass or mica slides in general continued to be used into the '40s and '50s, largely as advertising for local business and upcoming shows. Sing-a-longs continued as a practice in some theaters mainly with organ accompaniment. The fact that these sing-a-long slides were prepared for not only theaters in the late '20s, but for featured songs that were used in film scores, is unusual to say the least.
J. Theakston
"You get more out of life when you go out to a movie!"
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Gagman 66

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 2:35 pm

Rodney,

:) OK, I found the list. It is from 2002. Here is the old link.Can we get any sort of confirmation that they might still have this film?


http://groups.google.com/group/alt.movi ... mona+czech
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bobfells

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 2:56 pm

The fact that these sing-a-long slides were prepared for not only theaters in the late '20s, but for featured songs that were used in film scores, is unusual to say the least.


It would be interesting to learn how many late 20s films got the "slide treatment" but I will be posting more from THE SINGING FOOL, THE AWAKENING (a lost 1928 Vilma Banky film), and RIO RITA.
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Rodney

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 3:31 pm

Gagman 66 wrote:Rodney,

:) OK, I found the list. It is from 2002. Here is the old link.Can we get any sort of confirmation that they might still have this film?


http://groups.google.com/group/alt.movi ... mona+czech


Nice. Glad to see it's there, although of course we don't know how much or what condition. I would love to see it, and create a score for it if someone wants to show it...
Rodney Sauer
The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra
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"Let the Music do the Talking!"
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Brooksie

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PostMon Feb 21, 2011 5:51 pm

bobfells wrote:
The fact that these sing-a-long slides were prepared for not only theaters in the late '20s, but for featured songs that were used in film scores, is unusual to say the least.


It would be interesting to learn how many late 20s films got the "slide treatment" but I will be posting more from THE SINGING FOOL, THE AWAKENING (a lost 1928 Vilma Banky film), and RIO RITA.


This is intriguing - thanks everyone. There seems to have been a trend towards these sort of themes in the very late silent period - `Charmaine' (What Price Glory), `Marie' (The Awakening), `Diane' (Seventh Heaven) as well as `Ramona'.

Given how common examples of the sheet music for these themes are, I had often suspected they were part of some wider in-cinema promotion. This is the first time I recall hearing any proof for it.

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