Film Festivals 101

Announcements of upcoming theatrical silent film exhibitions.
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Arndt

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Film Festivals 101

PostTue Oct 28, 2014 12:41 pm

In this thread I would like to collect important information for anyone wishing to visit one of the many film festivals around the world. Please feel free to add any additional info you think important or ask any questions you like. Please post about other festivals you are in the know about.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostTue Oct 28, 2014 12:48 pm

Le Giornate del Cinema Muto, Pordenone

What is it?
The Giornate del Cinema Muto (which translates as 'Days of Silent Cinema') started 34 years ago. These days they are arguably the most important festival of silent film in the world. They showcase newly found and newly restored films - complete and as fragments - but they also have themed retrospectives and make a point of showing great films under the heading 'The canon revisited'.

Where is it?
Pordenone is a small town in the north of Italy, about one hour north of Venice. It is an industrial town and administrative capital of about 50,000 inhabitants. You can get there by train, plane or automobile. People here speak Italian, but at the festival everybody understands and speaks English, too.

Where can I stay?
Pordenone is not a touristy place. That means there are not that many hotels, but hotels there still are and a few budget ones, too, or so I was told. There is no campsite and very little self-catering accommodation. We found a nice place on Airbnb, but the festival also wrote to me to ask if I needed help in finding private accommodation.

When do they take place?
The Giornate usually take place in early October and run for just over a week, from Saturday to Saturday.

How many films do they show?
A great many. This year there were about forty features and many more short films and clips. The programme starts at 9 am and runs till shortly before midnight pretty much every day. There are two 90-minute breaks for lunch and dinner, but there are no other breaks between the films, so you have to steal out for a pitstop.

How are the films presented?
Unless the film has an original soundtrack there is always excellent musical accompaniment by top international film musicians. All titles are translated into English and Italian.

What else is on?
In the lunchbreak there are musical masterclasses and close, chummy 'Collegium Dialogues', where people with an awesome knowledge of film music and film facts let you into their world. This alone is worth visiting the festival for.

How much does it cost?
In 2014 you could see the whole programme (minus the first and last night films, which cost an extra 15 euros each) for a one-off fee of 65 euros, if you were a registered guest. If you were not registered, you paid 8 euros for the daytime programme and 10 euros for the evening programme every day. Most people register and proudly display their nametags. When you register you also get a tote bag with the catalogue, which would otherwise cost you 10 euros. So registering is the way to go.

How do I register?
You should register in advance via the festival website: http://www.cinetecadelfriuli.org/gcm/. You can do so in English as well as in Italian. They email you back two or three months before the festival starts and tell you to register properly and send them a photo for your nametag. (If you don't send them a photo, they'll put on a generic one.) Once they have confirmed your registration you're ready to go. They are very helpful, by the way, so you can email them any questions you have.
When you arrive you pay your 65 euros, pick up your nametag and your goody bag at the offices next to the theatre and start watching films.
You can also be a 'donor', pay something like 200 euros, get a bigger goody bag and VIP treatment.

What's the cinema like?
The Teatro Verdi is a multi-purpose auditorium. It seats around 700 people (my guestimate) in the stalls and on three galleries. There are various seating experiences, and you'll find out eventually what is your own personal best compromise between a good view of the screen and a comfortable position.

Who goes there?
Everybody who is anybody. That may be an exaggeration, but I did have the feeling that there were a lot of the movers and shakers of the tiny little silent film universe present: academics, film historians, archivists, musicians but also plain old silent film geeks like me. The atmosphere was neither hermetic nor deadly serious, though. I felt I could just talk to anybody and I made many new acquaintances that way. There are obviously fairly closed circles of people who have known each other for years, but the atmosphere was still free and easy enough.

Bits of advice:

Food: As you come out of the Teatro Verdi cross the long square and enter the pedestrianized area. Here you will find the restaurant Alla Cattina, which is good for dinner (try the salads!), and next door to it a fast food pizza emporium, whiich is good for lunch. In 2014 a buffet was laid on at the Hotel Moderno between the two parts of DIE NIBELUNGEN. I paid 15 euros for it, but there was not nearly enough food, so I had to drink my own weight in red wine to make up for it. In future I will avoid such gimmicks.

Shopping: There is a small film fair on level three of the Teatro Verdi. This is good for buying film books, DVDs etc., but also a convenient place to sit out at least part of the dinner break, as the doors below close for the break and for some evening performances the queues to get back in are quite massive.
Pordenone has a lot of small boutiquy shops, but remember that even in the north of Italy everything closes down at lunchtime for three to five hours.

Wi-Fi: There is excellent free Wi-Fi in the foyer of the Teatro Verdi and on all levels. At the top level there are several computers for anybody to use.

Nametag: Do not put your nametag into the front pocket of your jeans or you end up looking like the creature from the black lagoon on your photo.
Last edited by Arndt on Sat Apr 30, 2016 3:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Oct 31, 2014 7:31 am

Internationale Stummfilmtage, Bonn

What is it?
The Internationale Stummfilmtage (which translates as International Days of Silent Film) started in 1985. In 30 years 704 silent films from 27 countries have been shown there. They try to show a mix of rare films and well-known masterworks, international curiosities, newly discovered and restored films and some shorts.

Where is it?
Bonn is a city of around 300,000 inhabitants in the west of Germany, about 30 minutes south of Cologne. It lies in a pretty position on the banks of the river Rhine and is an administrative capital with some industry. From 1949 to 1990 it was the capital of West Germany. Apart from the native German just about everybody speaks English here. It shares an airport with Cologne.

Where can I stay?
Bonn has many hotels, hostels, apartments and campsites in all price ranges where you can stay.

When do they take place?
The Stummfilmtage usually take place in mid-August and run for 10 days, from Thursday to Sunday.

How many films do they show?
In 2014 they showed 14 features and 10 shorts or programmes of shorts. The programme starts at 9 pm and usually runs till around midnight. On the two Sundays there are programmes in the afternoon in the cinema of the Rheinisches Landesmuseum, a local museum. Here restoration works in progress and fragments are also shown, whereas the main programme only shows more or less complete films.

How are the films presented?
Films are shown with titles in their original languages with a German translation projected at the side if needed. They are accompanied by a host of excellent international film musicians like Günter Buchwald, Joachim Bärenz, Richard Siedhoff, Stephen Horne and Neil Brand.

What else is on?
In recent years there have sometimes been symposiums on film history during the day.

How much does it cost?
It's free. There is no entrance fee, although donations are welcome. For the Sunday events at the museum you pay 7 euros per day.

What's the cinema like?
The films are shown open-air in the Arkadenhof, the quadrangle of Bonn University. On a balmy late summer evening this is a glorious setting, but not so much in the pouring rain. The quadrangle holds about 2000 people and is often filled to capacity in good weather, especially at weekends and for American comedies. The folding seats are rather uncomfortable so it's a good idea to bring a cushion. In order to get a good seat you ought to show up early. Doors can open as early as 7 pm, but do not be much later than 8 pm or you may not get a seat.

Who goes there?
This one is for everybody. It attracts a diverse crowd: from students to old dears, from noobs to regulars.

Bits of advice:

What to do during the day: This is a very interesting area that attracts a lot of tourists. The romantic part of the Rhine valley starts at Bonn and you can take boat or train trips past all the castles down to Loreley rock and beyond to Rüdesheim. Bonn and Cologne have lots of museums and historic buildings.

Food: There are many restaurants around the university, but be sure to try out the falafel booth round the corner opposite the cathedral. They have a happy hour.

Shopping: There is a stall that sells DVDs, posters and other film-related merchandise. You can also buy seat cushions and rainproof ponchos.
Bonn has lots of big and small shops that cater for (almost) any taste.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 07, 2014 11:17 am

Loud Silents Festival, Tampere, Finland

What is it?
Loud Silents Festival is a new and exciting silent film festival.The festival seeks to connect silent films and younger audiences and to bring live silent cinema screenings to a wider range of audiences. The festival has a special emphasis on the music and accompaniment side of things. Every year the festival commissions new scores from a wide range of musical styles. In 2015 the festival is planning to start accompanying workshops for musicians.

Where is it?
Tampere is located in southern Finland. The city has an approx. population of 200,000 and it is the second-largest urban area after Helsinki. Helsinki can be reached in 1.5 hours by train and 2 hours by car. The distance to Turku is approximately the same. Tampere Airport is the third-busiest airport in Finland, with 800,000 passengers annually. Ryanair has flights to Tampere from the UK, Spain, Italy, Germany and others.

Where can I stay?
Tampere has many hotels, hostels and apartments in all price ranges. Every year the Festival has few special deals and tips, so contact the organisers to find out the best deal.

When do they take place?
Loud Silents Festival takes place at the end of April. In 2015 the festival runs for three days with open music workshops running through-out the week.

How many films do they show?
In the first two editions 4 shows were presented and in 2015 will be around 5-6 screenings. Since there are only so few screenings, each of the shows are treated with special attention. All the screenings are original commissions specially presented for the first time to public at the Loud Silents Festival.

How are the films presented?
Every screening is a spectacle. Each film will be projected either from 35mm or 16mm copies with a live band accompaniment. The range of music styles is as diverse as the films screened. Already in the first two years, the festival has presented comedy, experimental, romance and Finnish classics with music styles ranging from folk, electro, jazz to ethnic, heavy rock and others. The musicians are the best in Finland and many of them are widely known as solo artists as well.
Every film will be subtitled with English and Finnish subtitles, in addition to the original language of the print.

How much does it cost?
The prices vary with special discounts from 8€ to 12€.

What's the cinema like?
The festival takes place in an old 1920s film theatre, which is currently in use by the Tampere university theatre group. The venue still has some of the old cinema past remaining, which gives the festival a special aura. Before Loud Silents brought films back into the venue, it had also operated as an electro music club and a striptease bar.

Who goes there?
Like the ethos of festival to bring silent films to younger audiences, the audience is mainly young film and music fans, but there also older enthusiasts who respond to both films and music.

Bits of advice:
What to do during the day: There's plenty to see in Tampere. The city is an old industrial town with a lot of the old factory buildings restored for use. Tampere is also situated between two lakes, so the view from the sight seeing tower is spectacular.

Food: The festival takes places in the centre so there are plenty of eating places near by.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 07, 2014 11:39 am

Not that i'd ever have a chance to go to that, but the first question that pops into my mind for such a far northern country is what the weather is likely to be in April. How would you advise folks to dress?

thanks,
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 07, 2014 2:15 pm

greta de groat wrote:Not that i'd ever have a chance to go to that, but the first question that pops into my mind for such a far northern country is what the weather is likely to be in April. How would you advise folks to dress?

thanks,
greta


I'd love to go, though, just for the chance to see Finland. I'm halfway convinced that the Finns spend a good portion of each day spouting bits of the Kalevala. (OK, probably not. I know, it's a silly fantasy.) But the interest and knowledge about silent and early film in Finland is impressive for such a small country, if the posts from N-Ville's resident Finns are any indication.
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http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 07, 2014 2:31 pm

You are very warmly welcome to Finland, Greta and Frederica. Greta's question about the weather is a little bit difficult: last spring was very warm and during the Loud Silents there was some 15-20 degrees warm. Previous year was much colder. So there is no simple answer, all I can say is that you have to watch a weather forecast.

Of course we are spouting bits of Kalevala - every day and everywhere. You will be surprised about that :)
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 07, 2014 4:25 pm

Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostSat Nov 08, 2014 12:22 am

Well, even that the weather is variable is useful information, keeps us on our toes! The farthest north i've been was to Stockholm and Talinn during the heat wave of 2006 when it was gorgeous, so i think i'm spoiled.

Anyway, it sounds like a lovely festival.

greta
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostSat Nov 08, 2014 2:51 pm

Now somewhere nearly as exotic as Finland:

Cinevent, Columbus Ohio
REVISED 8/10/15

What is it?
A collectors' festival (founded by guys who had put on Cinecon, back in the days when it used to travel, and figured they might as well keep doing it), showing 16mm in a hotel meeting room, tying in with 35mm at the Wexner Center nearby some years, and with several dealer rooms offering prints, posters and stills, and other stuff. A high end poster auction is held each year (mostly online), and those posters are always worth a (free) look. Go here: http://www.cinevent.com

Where is it?
Columbus is the home of Ohio State University and is like most college towns— young, active and with good restaurants.

Where can I stay?
The festival is at the Renaissance Columbus Downtown.

When do they take place?
Late May/early June; it will be June 2-5, 2016 and Memorial Day weekend in 2017.

How many films do they show?
They're shown continuously all four days of the festival, pretty much 9 am to midnight, with meal breaks. So upwards of 20 programs over the weekend. It tends to be a mix of warhorses and obscurities, aiming for somewhat broad appeal to help attract memorabilia shoppers. Regular programs include a morning animation show, and a fair amount of Laurel and Hardy and Charley Chase. The range of movies goes from teens silent features to 40s and 50s noir, and is usually pretty well planned so that just when you're getting tired of one kind of thing, you get something else.

How are the films presented?
In a meeting room full of hotel chairs on 16mm. Given the non-actual theater conditions, the shows are very well run, with good sound and a picture as big as the room will permit. Silents are accompanied live in the room, most typically by Phil Carli or David Drazin (who is the staff accompanist at the Film Center in Chicago).

What else is on?
The dealer rooms are active mainly for the first two days. You hear the occasional talk of collectors showing more titles after the show, i.e., at midnight in their rooms. I've never had the urge to catch one more film that night, I need my sleep for the next day!

How much does it cost?
The show is crazy cheap; $40 in advance for the whole weekend. The rooms at the Renaissance run about $125 a night with taxes. It is a vast improvement over the now-demolished Ramada where it used to be (and was, admittedly, much cheaper, but you get what you pay for!)

How do I register?
Go here: http://www.cinevent.com

What's the cinema like?
It's a hotel meeting room, see above.

Who goes there?
Cinevent overlaps with NitrateVille quite a bit and you'll definitely meet some folks who post here. Or... don't, but are at Silentcomedymafia.com! (Richard Roberts is one of the main collectors whose films are shown, along with Eric Grayson, Steve Haynes and others.)

Bits of advice:

Food: On the plus side the new location is closer to downtown and to better things than McDonald's and Bob Evans. On the downside it's Memorial Day weekend so nearby places can be closed, but you're not that far from a number of centers of restaurant activity. The indoor market is less than a mile away and has a wide range of ethnic choices, Germantown has German food and Katzinger's deli, and a little further is the High Street strip heading to the university which has some of everything.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostSun Nov 09, 2014 9:57 pm

Kansas Silent Film Festival

What is it?
The Kansas Silent Film Festival originated in 1997. Originally a one-day festival, it usually starts on the last Friday night in February and is all day and evening on the following Saturday. The festival is a showcase for silent film music as well as films. The festival is free. The crowds in the evenings are usually quite large.

Where is it?
Topeka is the capitol of the state of Kansas. The festival takes place in the White Concert Hall at Washburn University. While Topeka does have a small airport, major airlines do not fly there. The Kansas City (Missouri) International Airport is about 75 miles away. Interstate I-70 runs east-west through Topeka. US highway 75 runs north-south through Topeka, and I-335 comes in from the southwest.

Where can I stay?
Most of the hotels in the area are budget hotels. There are not any hotels within walking distance, but there are plenty a few miles away near the two interstate highways. The Best Western Topeka Inn and Suites has been the official hotel of the festival staff for the last several years. The "Directions" page on the Festival website has links to several hotels including two Holiday Inns, two Motel 6 locations, and an Econo Lodge. If you prefer a nicer hotel, the Capitol Plaza Hotel is very nice, and has a wonderful breakfast buffet.

When do they take place?
The festival takes place the last weekend of February on Friday night and all day Saturday.

How many films do they show?
The festival usually has one program segment Friday night, one Saturday morning, two Saturday afternoon and one Saturday night. The segment programs usually consist of a short or two and a feature. Sometime a double-feature is presented. Since the festival is intended for the general public, some of the films are "war-horses" that can be found on DVD or BluRay. Other films will be those that are difficult to see without access to a film library.

How are the films presented?
Films are presented with a live music by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra, organist Marvin Faulwell, pianist Jeff Rapsis, and sometimes percussionist Bob Keckeisen. Occasionally they are required to run the original soundtrack, as with Charlie Chaplin's The Circus. About half of the films are presented via 16mm projection, and others are shown on DVD or high-definition video projection. While die-hard silent film fans may complain about "war horse" films being shown, you have not really experienced Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd, Langdon or Laurel and Hardy comedies until you've seen them with a crowd of 500+ people. The films are introduced by Denise Morrison. Bill Shaffer always presents at least one surprise (i.e. unannounced) short film each year.

What else is on?
The festival is the whole show.

How much does it cost?
The films are free. The Cinema Dinner is $30, but you get a yummy dinner, including a silent-film-themed piece of cake, and a lecture on a silent film topic.

How do I register?
No registration is required to see the films. The non-refundable price for the Cinema-Dinner is $30 per ticket, payable to Kansas Silent Film Festival. Mail your ticket request to: KSFF Cinema-Dinner P.O. Box 2032 Topeka, Kansas 66604-2032. It is best to order your dinner tickets early, as the dinner has sole out before.

What's the cinema like?
The White Concert Hall was built for music, which sounds incredible there. The screen is set back from the stage and is small compared to the size of the auditorium, so I'd recommend that you sit on the lower level and not in the balcony.

Who goes there?
The crowds are diverse. Silent film lovers fly and drive in from out of state. The festival draws a large number of people locally, from older adults, couples, college students and high school students.

Bits of advice:
Weather: There can still be snowstorms in late February in Kansas. If there is a chance of a snow storm, you might want to allow extra time on your drive or make sure that your flight does not get delayed. The interstate highways are usually plowed as soon as the storm is over, but you will not be able to drive the speed limit.

Food: Don't miss the Cinema Dinner. The food is very good and you can discuss films with the other guests at your banquet table. The festival usually gives away a few door prizes. There is always a lecture after dinner with the festival's guest. Previous guests have included preservationist David Shepard, pianist Jeff Rapsis, author Annette Lloyd, and preservationist Paul Gierucki.

On Saturday, you can grab lunch at the University cafeteria near the concert hall. The Varsity Blues Bar & BBQ is within walking distance. It is small, and serves burgers, barbeque, and beer that are OK but nothing special. Five blocks away, which is a little far to walk in cold weather, is a Subway sandwich shop which is popular with festival goers. Also there is a Dairy Queen, but it only has outside seating, which can be quite cold in February. Three blocks east of the concert hall is a Papa John's pizza (take-out only) and Great Wall Chinese food.

Shopping: There are some booths selling silent-film related items including film books and even jewelry. There is always a large selection of silent film DVDs and BluRay discs, many featuring the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra. As the festival is on a college campus, there are no stores nearby other than the Kwik Shop convenience store.

The festival website is http://www.kssilentfilmfest.org/
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostMon Nov 10, 2014 5:56 am

silentfilm wrote: you have not really experienced Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd, Langdon or Laurel and Hardy comedies until you've seen them with a crowd of 500+ people.


It is amazing how these films come into their own with a big crowd. I guess that's what they were intended for.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Nov 21, 2014 11:55 pm

There are silent film festivals in Odessa Ukraine, and Toronto.

The AFI Silver, in Silver Spring MD is just completing a 20 event month of silents.
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostFri Dec 19, 2014 8:50 pm

And then there's the Tromsa Norway Silent Film Days.

Gorgeous antique theater, in the gorgeous far north of Norway. Ben Model plays every year

http://tiff.no/en/news/silent-film-days-program
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostSun Jan 04, 2015 3:02 pm

Forssan Kansainväliset Mykkäelokuvafestivaalit, Finland

What is it?
Forssan Kansainväliset Mykkäelokuvafestivaalit (Forssa International Silent Film Festival) started in 2000 so it is the oldest silent film festival in Scandinavia. During the years we have showed over 100 features and shorts, some of them are quite rare stuff.

Where is it?
Forssa is a little town (less than 20 000 people) in southwest Finland, some 100 kilometers from Helsinki, Turku and Tampere. The only way to get to Forssa is by bus: decades ago there was a railroad but not anymore.

Where can I stay?
There are a couple of hotels in Forssa, most of them very near to the festival area. Prices are reasonable.

When do they take place?
The festival takes place either at the end of August or in the beginning of September. It starts nowadays on Monday but the main event is still on weekend.

How many films they show?
We usually have 9-12 screenings. The main event starts on Friday at 17:00 and that evening includes three screenings. On Saturday we start at 12:00 and have six screenings. Sometimes we show films on Sunday, too.

How are the films presented?
Films are shown with titles in their original language with a Finnish translation if needed. I hope that in the future we can translate Finnish silents to English, too. There are all kind of excellent musicians and live bands playing.

How much does it cost?
If you are a member of Forssa Silent Film Association, it costs 12 euros per screening. Otherwise the cost is 15 euros.

What’s the cinema like?
Elävienkuvien Teatteri is the oldest Finnish movie theater still in action. It was founded in 1906 but closed in 1930. After that there was all kind of stores before it was left in 1990. The building was in very bad condition when local town association got it from its owner, the town itself. The theater was restored in original shape (it included wooden benches like a hundred years before, which wasn’t very comfortable). Today the theater is digitalized and it has normal movie theater benches (some people have said that new benches broke the atmosphere but I don’t think so). Now there is room for 100 people.

Who goes there?
The festival is for everybody. Unfortunately it seems that local people aren’t interested in the festival, most of the visitors are from everywhere else than Forssa. We usually have visitors from abroad too.

Bits of advice:
Because we are in Forssa, we don’t have stores where to buy special DVD’s or something like that. You can buy festival t-shirts and bags from the festival place. If you are hungry, there are restaurants nearby and we usually have deals with local restaurants that festival people will get some discount. We have a little café where you can buy snacks.

There are also old factories and museums to visit. And you can spend time by walking by the riverside which leads you to a large and beautiful park.

Festival homepage: http://www.forssasilentmovie.com/
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostSun Jan 18, 2015 8:44 pm

The Sydney Silent Film Festival has started in January and will be going intermittently until May. Most screenings are at the Sydney State Library.

Here is a link to the website for full programme details:
http://www.ozsilentfilmfestival.com.au/ ... ntCatId=14
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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostWed Aug 05, 2015 3:12 pm

Capitolfest

What is it?
Capitolfest is New York's premier classic film festival—a place to see rarely-shown and newly-discovered films of the silent and early talkie era, held at the historic 1,788-seat movie palace, the Capitol Theatre, in Rome, New York, which opened in December, 1928 as a movie house. Capitolfest is regarded by attendees from the U.S., Canada, and Europe as the movie lover’s dream vacation, the weekend festival starts late Friday morning and ends early on Sunday evening. Screenings are arranged by session, with each session essentially comprised of a double feature plus short subjects. Each session contains intermissions and there are generous breaks between sessions (allowing for meals) as well. The philosophy of Capitolfest is that there should be time to savor the films, thus their slogan, “A vacation, not a marathon.”

Where is it?
Capitolfest is set in the small upstate New York city of Rome (population c.33,000). It is a 4-hour drive from New York City, 45-minutes from Syracuse and 90 minutes from Albany.

Where can I stay?
There are ten hotels in the area, and about half a dozen Bed & Breakfast locales. Many of these carry discounts for Capitolfest attendees.

When do they take place?
The festival always takes place the second weekend in August. It commences on Friday, and ends early evening on Sunday. There is also a Thursday night preglow.

How many films they show?
There are seven sessions, each with two features and two to four selected short subjects.

How are the films presented?
Films are presented in 35mm with variable speed for silent films. All films are shown in their original aspect ratio. Included as part of Capitolfest's silent film line-up is live organ accompaniment for each film, played on their original installation, 3-manual, 10-rank Style 70 Möller Theatre Organ. Restoration work on the organ was started in 2002, and since then it has been used on a regular basis to accompany silent movies. Each of the silent films are accompanied by some of the world’s foremost exponents of authentic silent movie accompaniment. Eminent musicians such as Avery Tunningley, Bernie Anderson, Dr. Phillip C. Carli, Robert Israel and Dennis James have performed for films on the Capitol's Moller in the past. Additionally, ensembles such as the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra have graced the Capitol's orchestra pit in accompaniment of films.

How much does it cost?
All-festival pre-August 1st pass is $55. After August 1st, it is $60. Day and session passes are also available.

What’s the cinema like?
The historic Capitol Theatre in downtown Rome was opened in December 1928. Built as part of the Kallet Theater chain of cinemas, the theater is augmented by a full-sized stage. The theater is decorated in a mixture of Spanish and Moorish Renaissance architectural styles and is set upon two floors, with an orchestra, loge and balcony section. The centerpiece of the theater is its octagonal ceiling dome, which contains over 400 light bulbs to indirectly illuminate the auditorium. In 1939, the theater was remodeled with primarily Modernistic light fixtures, carpeting, wall fabric and painting, which complements the traditional plasterwork in a quirky way. The screen is 20-feet high and the proscenium is flanked by two intricate organ grilles. In front of the stage is an orchestra pit with the Möller Theatre Organ console in the center of it.

Image

Who goes there?
Capitolfest attracts cinephiles from around the world and is open to the general public.

Bits of advice:
The theater has expanded into a complex, encompassing three buildings to the left of the face of the building. In one of these is Cinema Capitol, a first-run independent and art film venture with one screen (soon to be two) that seats 50. To the left of this building is Brenda's Natural Foods, offering among its regular grocery fare, a cafe that serves food throughout its business hours. In the rear of these buildings is another building that contains a dealers room, offering all sorts of film memorabilia.

Rome, NY is a very historical area and aside from the Capitol, there are other interesting places to visit in the downtown area. To the north is beautiful Lake Delta, and to the southwest is Sylvan Beach, which includes a mostly-unchanged 1950s amusement park. Rome is also in proximity to two major casinos, as well as the Utica and Syracuse metropolitan areas.

Festival homepage: http://www.romecapitol.com/capitolfest.html
J. Theakston
"You get more out of life when you go out to a movie!"
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Daniel Eagan

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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostThu Aug 06, 2015 12:00 pm

One of these days I hope to attend Capitofest, you always have incredible line-ups.
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Bob Furmanek

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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostMon Aug 10, 2015 1:13 pm

Capitolfest was fantastic.

Great job by the entire crew. Classic movies in a classic theatre: it doesn't get any better than that.

See you next year!
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Jim Roots

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Re: Film Festivals 101

PostTue Aug 11, 2015 6:00 am

greta de groat wrote:Well, even that the weather is variable is useful information, keeps us on our toes! The farthest north i've been was to Stockholm and Talinn during the heat wave of 2006 when it was gorgeous, so i think i'm spoiled.

Anyway, it sounds like a lovely festival.

greta


They are predicting a year of El Nino weather around the world, which means a very mild winter but a lot of rain.

Jim
(currently staring glumly out the window at the first of a predicted six straight days of rain in Ottawa, Canada)

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