"Spartacus" in 35mm Nov.18; A Tribute to Kirk Douglas at 100

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Loew'sJersey

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"Spartacus" in 35mm Nov.18; A Tribute to Kirk Douglas at 100

PostTue Nov 01, 2016 5:57 pm

Friday, November 18 8PM
“Spartacus” – Starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, Jean Simmons. Directed by Stanley Kubrick. 1960, 197mins, Color. In 35mm.

At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ. (201) 798-6055. loewsjersey.org. facebook.com/landmarkloewsjersey/

$8 for adults; $6 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger).

“Spartacus” is the kind of visually extravagant film that needs to be enjoyed on the Big Screen, and that’s how you’ll see it at the Loew’s Jersey, in 35mm. Of the many roles Kirk Douglas has played, none is more iconic than the title character here. Based on a historical slave revolt that really did rock the Roman Empire, "Spartacus" is certainly not a documentary -- but nor is it the run-of-the-mill, typically cheesy "sword & sandal" picture that Hollywood was churning out at mid-century. It does have the hallmarks of the "epic" class of movie: exciting action, exotic settings, and breath-taking visuals that fill the big screen. And it also has an epic's "all-star" cast – no less than Laurence Olivier, Tony Curtis, Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton and Jean Simmons. But unlike many other Hollywood epics in which big stars seem to have been mechanically assembled -- and also woodenly directed -- merely for the value of their names, in "Spartacus" the big stars give great performances that mesh well with each other, and deliver something else that distinguishes "Spartacus" from many of the other “epics” of its era: intelligent dialogue.

The making and later history of the film had some epic-like aspects as well: It was a very expensive production for its time ($12 million, took 167 days to film, and used up to 8,500 extras. After filming had begun, Douglas – who produced the film – heatedly clashed with director Anthony Mann, fired him, and brought in Stanley Kubrick instead. For a 1967 re-release, a crucial scene between Olivier and Curtis was famously cut because it was deemed to have “homo erotic” overtones. When a 1990s restoration project wanted to return the cuts scene, only the visual element could be located; the soundtrack for the deletion had been irretrievably lost. Tony Curtis was able to re-dub his lines, but Laurence Olivier had died a few years earlier. All seemed lost until somebody remembered hearing Anthony Hopkins do a remarkably good impersonation of Olivier at a dinner party. So with the permission of Olivier’s estate, the cut scene was restored with Hopkins dubbing Olivier.

The Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ., is easily reached by car and mass transit from throughout the New York & New Jersey area. We are located directly across JFK Blvd from the JSQ PATH Station with trains to and from the World Trade Center and 33rd Street in Manhattan, as well as Newark’s Penn Station. The Theatre is close to the NJ Turnpike & Holland Tunnel. Discounted off street parking in Square Ramp Garage. Tel: (201) 798-6055 Web: loewsjersey.org Email: [email protected]" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank.

The Loew's is a place where the great movie going experience is still alive -- a classic movie palace, a 50 foot wide screen, and a real pipe organ for entrance music before most shows! And whenever possible, screenings are still in 35mm.
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Spiny Norman

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Re: "Spartacus" in 35mm Nov.18; A Tribute to Kirk Douglas at

PostWed Nov 02, 2016 1:42 am

Loew'sJersey wrote:For a 1967 re-release, a crucial scene between Olivier and Curtis was famously cut because it was deemed to have “homo erotic” overtones. When a 1990s restoration project wanted to return the cuts scene, only the visual element could be located; the soundtrack for the deletion had been irretrievably lost. Tony Curtis was able to re-dub his lines, but Laurence Olivier had died a few years earlier. All seemed lost until somebody remembered hearing Anthony Hopkins do a remarkably good impersonation of Olivier at a dinner party. So with the permission of Olivier’s estate, the cut scene was restored with Hopkins dubbing Olivier.
Oh, I thought that the scene had always been cut? It was all a bit too obvious, wasn't it? This is the first time I hear that it had originally made it to the theatres.

The trick of redubbing is nice, and one that is sometimes forgotten. They didn't do anything similar for Mad Mad Mad Mad World.
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Spiny Norman

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Re: "Spartacus" in 35mm Nov.18; A Tribute to Kirk Douglas at

PostWed Nov 16, 2016 2:24 pm

So... can anyone verify if that "snails & oysters" scene was always cut from the first, or if it really was included originally?
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Re: "Spartacus" in 35mm Nov.18; A Tribute to Kirk Douglas at

PostSun Nov 20, 2016 5:48 pm

Spiny Norman wrote:So... can anyone verify if that "snails & oysters" scene was always cut from the first, or if it really was included originally?

There's some debate about whether the scene was in the original 197 minute preview version, before that was cut down to the 182 minute first-run version (and cut down again in 1967 for a 161 minute reissue).

This article details the efforts that went into the restoration, but doesn't have a clear answer about what was in the very first cut that was screened, versus subsequent road show, general release and reissue versions.

Some reviews mentioned graphic elements of the battle scenes...arms being lopped off--blood spurting from a stump. Film lore had discussed, but few could remember actually seeing the scene in which Tony Curtis is the attempted seductive of Laurence Olivier--what has become known as the "snails and oysters" scene. Nor could people actually remember seeing the blood of the slave Draba (played by Woody Strode) hit Crassus (Olivier) square in the face as Draba's neck is slit by Crassus' knife.
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