Hans Salter

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brendangcarroll

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Hans Salter

PostThu Nov 17, 2016 5:39 am

Here is an interesting piece about another Viennese composer who escaped the Nazis just before the Anschluss and went to Hollywood - Hans Salter!

https://www.nmz.de/artikel/von-alban-be ... ankenstein" target="_blank

It's in German but Google will give a rough translation for non-German speakers.

He is one of the forgotten figures of film music and in my opinion, unjustly so.

His work for Universal studios and especially its legendary horror films, deserves far wider recognition.

And he was a pupil of Alban Berg!


Brendan Carroll
"Korngold has so much talent he could give half away and still have enough left for himself..." Giacomo Puccini (1921)
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bobfells

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Re: Hans Salter

PostThu Nov 17, 2016 8:24 am

Salter is relatively well-known by fans of the Universal horror films. His music is such an integral part of these films that as a kid I would repeatedly watch them just to hear his music. Naxos has issued a CD with Wm. Stromberg conducting the Moscow Symphony Orchestra playing themes (possibly reconstructed?) from SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS, and THE WOLFMAN. Since Universal reused this music in subsequent films the music on this CD more or less covers the waterfront (if I may use that expression) at least as far as Salter's horror film score go.

A less heralded Universal composer who often didn't get screen credit is Heinz Roemheld. Despite his foreign sounding name he was born in Milwaukee. If you've seen and heard THE INVISIBLE MAN (1933), THE BLACK CAT (1934), and DRACULA'S DAUGHTER (1936), then you are familiar with his work - but there's no CD as far as I know of his work on these classics. Wikipedia has an informative Monograph on him:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Roemheld
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brendangcarroll

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Re: Hans Salter

PostThu Nov 17, 2016 8:59 am

Heinz Roemheld I know very well as he was one of Korngold's closest friends at Warner Brothers. The reason for that friendship was that Roemheld, though born in Milwaukee, spoke fluent German having grown up in a very cultured and German-speaking household .

He provided interpreting for Korngold during the filming of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT's DREAM ('34) and was assigned to assist Korngold during CAPTAIN BLOOD ('35) and worked on it, uncredited, as orchestrator.

Later on, in 1936, while scoring the Marion Davies-Dick Powell vehicle HEARTS DIVIDED, he had difficulty in writing a suitably sweeping cue for a particular scene and asked Korngold's help.

Korngold not only wrote the cue (for no fee!) he also conducted the sequence. It was so effective, Roemheld ended up basing the rest of his score on Korngold's beautiful sequence.

The Wikipedia bio is slightly adrift on some facts. I believe Ray Heindorf claimed the music Oscar for Yankee Doodle Dandy on which Roemheld assisted with the orchestration and arrangements, I do not think two statuettes were handed out - maybe others here may correct me on this.

His score for THE BLACK CAT is largely based on Liszt's B Minor piano sonata and very effective it is too.

As you say, an unjustly forgotten figure with literally hundreds of credits and very worthy of further research!
"Korngold has so much talent he could give half away and still have enough left for himself..." Giacomo Puccini (1921)
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bobfells

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Re: Hans Salter

PostThu Nov 17, 2016 9:36 am

My wish for a CD: a double bill of Roemheld's themes for INVISIBLE MAN, BLACK CAT (superb orchestration of Liszt), and the beautiful themes for DRACULA'S DAUGHTER. Probably not even 30 minutes in toto. But I would add Waxman's score for THE INVISIBLE RAY. A few minutes of this was heard on the BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN CD but it was mostly for a scene cut from the film ("The Accident") with the terrific love theme tacked on at the end.

P.S. Just looked up the Academy Awards: Roemheld shared it with Heindorf:
https://www.oscars.org/oscars/ceremonies/1943
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Ray Faiola

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Re: Hans Salter

PostTue Dec 06, 2016 12:06 pm

Heinz also wrote one of the great comedy scores - THE FULLER BRUSH MAN. The chase finale is really super.
Classic Film Scores on CD
http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com

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