Watching silent films on a widescreen television

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frostwing

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Watching silent films on a widescreen television

PostWed Apr 07, 2010 7:25 pm

Hi, i'm thinking about buying a widescreen tv and i'm wondering what it's like watching a silent film on one.
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Hal Erickson

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PostWed Apr 07, 2010 9:43 pm

You can always press the little button on the remote that changes the picture to the "normal "aspect ratio. Otherwise, it's like watching a normal-gauge picture in the middle, widened out on each side (and I'm not being facetious. It isn't "stretched", but it isn't "standard" either--at least not on my TV).
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greta de groat

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PostWed Apr 07, 2010 11:12 pm

Most people i know simply watch the films in widescreen no matter what the original aspect ratio. I can't understand how they can stand it, but it doesn't seem to bother them. Drives me crazy. Isn't there any control on the television to set it on to use the aspect ratio of the input rather than making it all either wide or not wide? The ones we have at work seem to need you specify if you want it different from whatever you played last. And it was really hard to change on my computer. This shouldn't be rocket science. Or does general public (and manufacturers) not care?

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Jim Reid

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PostWed Apr 07, 2010 11:25 pm

I have mine set up to play 4x3 at 4x3 and 16x9 at 16x9, the way God intended. I do have friends that have it set at 16x9 so that when they watch Laurel & Hardy, Stan is fat and Ollie is really fat. The reason they give me for this is they spent a lot of money on the tv and they don't want a third of the screen to be blank. Go figure.
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Danny Burk

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PostWed Apr 07, 2010 11:25 pm

My television has an "Aspect" button that easily lets me switch between 4:3 (traditional) and 16:9 (widescreen), plus several zoom modes. It stays on its last setting until I change it. Like Greta, I can't imagine how anyone can stand watching a film in the wrong aspect ratio...it's one of those things that irritates me to no end.
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daveboz

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Re: Watching silent films on a widescreen television

PostThu Apr 08, 2010 12:03 am

frostwing wrote:Hi, i'm thinking about buying a widescreen tv and i'm wondering what it's like watching a silent film on one.


==============

One word reply: Terrific!

One must qualify this statement somewhat, as TVs differ. Mine's an LCD [Samsung 40 inch], which I bought after close comparisons* with plasma and regular CRTs. (Tech note: LCDs are impervious to burn-in, whereas plasmas deteriorate from the moment you turn them on.)

The movie plays in the middle of the screen—no stretching (though one can apply said distortion if so desired). The great thing about this set is its geometrical accuracy. Most CRTs bend and bow the image in various ways; once you see the difference you'll never want to go back. Tiny details are beautifully delineated. The image is sharp all over, unlike many CRTS, which give a picture akin to what you see in theatres with cheap projection lenses.

Silents like Murnau's PHANTOM, with its wide range of tints and tones, look wonderful.

Connect the set to your DVD or Blu-Ray player with an HDMI cable, not via component or whatever you have. Don't pay an arm and a leg for the HDMI cable. It's a simple device that need not, but often does, break the bank.

So far I have not tested the set with Blu-Ray discs, but off-the-air hi-def broadcasts (NOT the stepped-on version your cable company gives you) are astounding. (You do not need an expensive antenna to pick up local hi-def broadcasts; do NOT pay the ridiculous prices that most electronics stores charge. You can make the antenna with a coat-hanger, a shoe-box, and a short length of co-ax cable in five minutes—instructions easily findable on-line.)

-------------------------

* For evaluation purposes I took along to the store three DVDs: a B&W film (THE GHOUL [1933]); a colour film (THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD [1938]; and a wide-screen colour film (Bunuel's DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE [1972]. I was surprised that the LCD looked best, as it was not what I expected from reading the standard lit on the subject. I would advise doing your homework before buying. Check out the Home Theater Forum for starters. But let your eyeballs be the final arbiter. Good luck!
yer pal Dave
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Michael O'Regan

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 2:42 am

greta de groat wrote: Or does general public (and manufacturers) not care?

greta

Nope. They don't care.
For the general public ( and thus accordingly the manufacturers) wider is better and bigger is better and higher definition is better. The general public know nothing of aspect ratios. As long as they've got a bucket big enough to hold the popcorn and a bigger one to hold the soda, they're happy.

My TV has an aspect ratio button to allow me to change it at will - like you guys I have to have the original ratio.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 3:37 am

I use Panasonic Plasma 46inch Full HD 1080i&p which I got in Aug 2008. I can get the current Panasonic 55inch for cheaper than I paid now. However, I did have a fault a few months after i got it and I was getting the on/off discs switch flash 8 times and nothing. This needed a board replaced(very simple job) but then could not get anything but the old analogue signals. This was because a fault had developed in the center board that also has the plugs inbuilt. Another quick job. All under free replacement. I enjoy the sound and the picture like never before. The DVDs do screen full out which I can change but the 4x3 Blu Rays screen center screen automatically. I use a Panasonic Blu ray 500gb HDD recorder which are not really promoted but rather the 250gb HDD model is. I got a good deal and matched all kinds of deals with a local franchise store and they accepted a $200 shopping center voucher I hads won in a monthly draw with a wellknown survey company. All good. But I did have to spend A$220 to get a local brand(not in stores) Blu Ray player that can play every conceivable Blu Ray discs in any Region Code. Panasonic only oblige with Region Free on their DVD part and great copying options and even CD to HSS added. The other Blu Ray starts swiftly9states fastest currently available) and seems to have a better color rendition than the other Blu Ray machines. I have sold a few machines by recommendation for them and they use my review on their site(no benefits for this). The Panasonic is supposed to last over 40 years and a 40 hours or so viewing per week. Hmmmm... What will they be using to view movies or whatever in 40 years time????

I got The African Queen this week and the quality is superb similar to another Paramount restoration I got, Zulu. Zulu was an British release I imported.

I have always been one for seeing films in their right ratio and embraced the laserdisc w/s when they figured out how to do it. Fox were big in issuing LD widescreen versions. Which brings me to another interesting encounter. I had an old friend who has died long ago and he wanted to show Carmen Jones to some friends in the music business and was disgusted with the CinemaScope version. I can't show this to my friends he said in tears, I would be embarrased.

I got a tape of another TCF, the 'scope version of Peyton Place. The lady bought it back and asked me to get a copy with the feet put back in!!!!

This week in the TV liftout (a weekly insert)of our Daily Murdoch paper they have a technical question answered about HDTV and set-top boxes. The expert led the writer up the path about these when he should have said they were not needed because all new TVs have a built-in board and, then, he told the writer that the old CRT TVs have better rendition of blacks(blacker blacks he said) and a sharper picture than LCD. LED or Plasmas. I have long given up writing back contradictions to these guys.

I am happy I was able to make the switch when I did to better watch what I want to in the form I want to. The old CRTs (2 still to be got rid of in our living room) broke down at the right time. I use one to sit my Blu Ray & DVD/VHS combo on!!!
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Rodney

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 9:00 am

I have a limited width in the space where our big TV goes, so I went with a NON-widescreen TV, one of those Sony behemoth CRT HDTVs that I got pretty cheap off craigslist. Weighs over 200 lbs, but I'm going to be moving it any time soon.

So for me, I waste a third of the screen when I watch widescreen movies.

Unfortunately, my two DVD players each behave badly -- the Sony works well for both wide-screen and regular ratios, but it can't play PAL video discs.

The Oppo will play all regions and will convert PAL discs, but for some reason when I watch 4:3 movies (like silents) it puts black bars at the top AND the sides of the screen, so I get a smaller picture all 'round. I've been through all of the menus, manual, and web site, and apparently it just doesn't believe that anyone uses non-widescreen TVs any more.

So, I rotate the two DVD players in and out depending on what I'm watching.
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Paul Penna

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 10:50 am

Rodney wrote:The Oppo will play all regions and will convert PAL discs, but for some reason when I watch 4:3 movies (like silents) it puts black bars at the top AND the sides of the screen, so I get a smaller picture all 'round. I've been through all of the menus, manual, and web site, and apparently it just doesn't believe that anyone uses non-widescreen TVs any more.


In a way, I do. I have a front projector throwing on to a 7.75 foot-wide 4:3 screen. By means of the projector's zoom lens I can fill the screen with 4:3 material (by far most of what I watch), but zoom back so that widescreen material plays full width but with the "letterbox" appearance of yore.

One thing I found in experimenting with both with my Oppo (970HD) and my Panasonic Blu-Ray player, is that the players' aspect ratio controls affect how much image is displayed with 4:3 material. Not image size, but image area.

Using the settings on the players that are intended to present both 4:3 and 16:9 material in their correct aspect ratios ("16:9 Wide" on the Oppo and "16:9" on the Panasonic), I still-framed on a closeup of a newspaper page, taking note of the amount showing at the left and right edges. I then switched the players to the mode that would stretch 4:3 material to fill a 16:9 screen for those misguided souls so inclined ("16:9 Wide/Auto" on the Oppo and "16:9 Full" on the Panasonic). I then used the projector's aspect ratio control to squeeze the image back to the correct 4:3 ratio. In both cases, there was more of the newspaper page at both the left and right. The image wasn't bigger, there was just more of it. With my third player, a Panasonic DVD recorder, there was no difference; it displayed the fullest image, i.e. no cropping at the edges, at all settings.

That's tangential to your problem, I realize, however I have noticed that the absolute image size of the Oppo, regardless of settings, is always slightly smaller than that from my other players. In my case, fortunately, I can deal with that via my projector's zoom lens.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 10:57 am

I have a Sony flat screen TV and a Sony BluRay player connected by an HDMI cable. After a bit of playing with the menus, the BluRay player menu being the key as I recall, I now have things set so that everything plays at its original ratio with appropriate areas of the screen left black without having to adjust anything on a disc by disc basis. With the black frame on the TV and a darkened room, one doesn't even notice the black portions of the screen.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 11:28 am

Channels that are in HD should automatically show things in the proper ratio. However, non-HD channels, such as TCM, do not so you will need to change your HDTV remote to 4:3 when watching TCM or other non-HD channels, and back to 16:9 (or Just Scan) when watching HD. My DirecTV DVR remote also has a function for changing ratios. However, I learned quickly not to use it, or to output things I'm recording to dvd-r at 4:3, because when you then play those on Blue Ray with its automatic compensation they will be extra-squished. Thus anything recorded on, say, TCM should be outputted stretched to dvd, then play it on a blue ray player and it will be correct.

It's funny how lay people used to feel "cheated" by letter-boxing because when they saw black and the top and bottom of their screens they thought they weren't getting their "money's worth" in the form of a full screen (even if getting their "money's worth" meant cropping a large part of the picture). Now those same folks probably feel "cheated" when their show leaves the left and right of the screen black. And it's really hard to explain to people that to watch a letterbox film in the correct aspect ratio on TCM (at least until it goes HD) you have to have black space on the top, bottom, left and right.
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Frederica

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 11:38 am

Brent Walker wrote:It's funny how lay people used to feel "cheated" by letter-boxing because when they saw black and the top and bottom of their screens they thought they weren't getting their "money's worth" in the form of a full screen (even if getting their "money's worth" meant cropping a large part of the picture). Now those same folks probably feel "cheated" when their show leaves the left and right of the screen black. And it's really hard to explain to people that to watch a letterbox film in the correct aspect ratio on TCM (at least until it goes HD) you have to have black space on the top, bottom, left and right.


I've never had anyone tell me they felt cheated by letterboxing, but a lot of them said they found the black bands on top and bottom of the screen disconcerting, since they weren't used to seeing them. I have a friend who watches everything in FatVision these days--she doesn't seem to notice it, but every time I look at her television I'm reaching for the remote.
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Jim Roots

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 11:45 am

Frederica wrote:
Brent Walker wrote:It's funny how lay people used to feel "cheated" by letter-boxing because when they saw black and the top and bottom of their screens they thought they weren't getting their "money's worth" in the form of a full screen (even if getting their "money's worth" meant cropping a large part of the picture). Now those same folks probably feel "cheated" when their show leaves the left and right of the screen black. And it's really hard to explain to people that to watch a letterbox film in the correct aspect ratio on TCM (at least until it goes HD) you have to have black space on the top, bottom, left and right.


I've never had anyone tell me they felt cheated by letterboxing, but a lot of them said they found the black bands on top and bottom of the screen disconcerting, since they weren't used to seeing them. I have a friend who watches everything in FatVision these days--she doesn't seem to notice it, but every time I look at her television I'm reaching for the remote.


One of the benefits of letterboxing is that the captions run in the lower black band and don't obscure the view of the screen action at all.

I'm currently watching the DVD first season of Deadwood (not letterboxed, obviously) and am pissed-off at the captions blacking out the bare boobs and other interesting visuals. But I can't switch to the transparent subtitles because they don't include sound effects.

Jim
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Christopher Jacobs

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 12:43 pm

To have movies display properly on any TV these days, you must set the correct menu options on both your DVD player or BluRay player AND on the TV set, or various forms of squeezing/stretching/letterboxing/pillarboxing can occur when they're not supposed to.

BluRay players and upscaling DVD players generally assume that you'll be watching on a native 16x9 monitor, so if you play them on a 4x3 monitor it will first letterbox it to 16x9 and then pillarbox the sides to display the proper image shape. This is very annoying when hoping to run a BluRay of a 1.33 movie through a 1.33 video projector, resulting in a much smaller image than running the regular DVD of the same film.

Every monitor seems to have different names for the display properties that show the full image (stretched if 4x3, normal if already 16x9), zoom settings (to eliminate the sidebars on 4x3 and/or the top and bottome letterboxing on scope films), and different stretch settings that sometimes display the center of a 4x3 image properly but gradually stretches out the sides to fill the 16x9 screen and gives a really weird look to the picture.

It may take 10-20 minutes or so of playing around with both your player and TV settings so you can come up with settings that will automatically show everything at the correct ratio. Then, if you move your player to a different TV set, you might have to change its settings again and remember to change them back when you move it back to the other TV.

But to answer the first question, silent movies look great on a widescreen HDTV (pillarboxed, of course), whether upscaled from a good DVD (Kino, Image, etc.) or from one of the few but fantastic-looking new BluRays of silents.

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 12:51 pm

I still haven't auditioned a widescreen set that's convinced me to replace my early '90s, 27" Gaoo and it has nothing to do with aspect ratio. While most widescreen monitors look great in colour, they leave a bit to be desired in black and white. In my opinion, there isn't as good a rending of greyscale. Everything ends up looking like a slightly contrasty print, with loss of gradiation, especially at the black end of the spectrum. I don't think the designers conscientiously considered the possibility of critical viewing of black and white images.

However, I have been considering updating the Gaoo to a larger CRT. With the change in broadcast standards, the bottom has fallen out of the market on used CRT sets and they are dirt cheap.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 1:10 pm

Rodney wrote:I have a limited width in the space where our big TV goes, so I went with a NON-widescreen TV, one of those Sony behemoth CRT HDTVs that I got pretty cheap off craigslist. Weighs over 200 lbs, but I'm going to be moving it any time soon.

So for me, I waste a third of the screen when I watch widescreen movies.

Unfortunately, my two DVD players each behave badly -- the Sony works well for both wide-screen and regular ratios, but it can't play PAL video discs.

The Oppo will play all regions and will convert PAL discs, but for some reason when I watch 4:3 movies (like silents) it puts black bars at the top AND the sides of the screen, so I get a smaller picture all 'round. I've been through all of the menus, manual, and web site, and apparently it just doesn't believe that anyone uses non-widescreen TVs any more.

So, I rotate the two DVD players in and out depending on what I'm watching.


I've got an Oppo DVD player hooked up to a standard CRT, and it plays just fine. One of your DVD player settings must be off. I'll check my settings when I get home and report back.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 1:59 pm

Definitely a widescreen TV is worth getting...especially upgrading to one via 1080p. But it depends if you are going to watch anything in HD or on Blu-ray. If you have money, then an HD projector and big screen is the way to go.

This is my setup but nothing fancy like some hardcore audio and videophiles. My dream is to have an HD projector and 150-200 inch screen...hopefully someday in my lifetime.

http://www.blu-ray.com/community/galler ... derid=1474
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Paul Penna

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 3:37 pm

WaverBoy wrote:I've got an Oppo DVD player hooked up to a standard CRT, and it plays just fine. One of your DVD player settings must be off. I'll check my settings when I get home and report back.


The discrepancy may be a result of varying degrees of under- and over-scanning. CRTs were generally designed to overscan to some degree, to assure a screen-filling image, but the amount varied. Control of over/under-scanning generally isn't easily accessible to the user, either with CRT or flat screen displays. The zoom lens on my front projector allows me to adjust the image size with a button on the remote. None of the settings on my Oppo (Model 970HD) have any effect on the image size, though they can affect the image area, as I mentioned in my earlier post. With the Oppo, I always have to zoom in a bit to fill my 4:3-shaped screen.
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kndy

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 4:33 pm

Brent Walker wrote:It's funny how lay people used to feel "cheated" by letter-boxing because when they saw black and the top and bottom of their screens they thought they weren't getting their "money's worth" in the form of a full screen (even if getting their "money's worth" meant cropping a large part of the picture).


I do remember right after the film "Titanic" came out and Blockbuster had the exclusive....there was a long, long line. But then they said...for those who want widescreen, go one line. Those who want fullscreen, stay in the same line. I remember when I was happy to go to the widescreen line and people were asking what it was and told them. They were like, "I can't stand that letterbox crap"...hehe...

But I understand, some people feel as if they are missing out on something. But then again, the same can be said about films with subtitles. When "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" was hyped and people were complaining how they were forced to read subtitles because they were missing out on the movie.
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Rodney

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 5:17 pm

WaverBoy wrote:I've got an Oppo DVD player hooked up to a standard CRT, and it plays just fine. One of your DVD player settings must be off. I'll check my settings when I get home and report back.


Well, it must be more complicated -- I was just checking Milestone's "Ultimate Phantom" DVD, and it fills the whole screen, even from the Oppo player. But a PAL DVD didn't. So it may not be all DVDs, just the PAL ones. We're drifting from the original topic here, however...
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silentfilm

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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 6:19 pm

I have a Sony Bravia TV and Sony BDP-360 BluRay, and it drives me crazy because DVD's automatically stretch instead of pillar-box. I've figured out that it is not the TV, because 4:3 BluRay's play just fine. It seems to stretch 4:3 DVDs, and I hate seeing everyone fat and short.

I've tried just about every setting on the DVD player and I can't figure it out. The TV has a nice setting on it to show 4:3 as 4:3, and it works just fine for cable television.
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PostThu Apr 08, 2010 6:50 pm

silentfilm wrote:I have a Sony Bravia TV and Sony BDP-360 BluRay, and it drives me crazy because DVD's automatically stretch instead of pillar-box. I've figured out that it is not the TV, because 4:3 BluRay's play just fine. It seems to stretch 4:3 DVDs, and I hate seeing everyone fat and short.

I've tried just about every setting on the DVD player and I can't figure it out. The TV has a nice setting on it to show 4:3 as 4:3, and it works just fine for cable television.


By any chance is your Blu-ray hooked up to a receiver which is then hooked up to your TV? Is it hooked up via HDMI?

But in terms of the stretching, on your player setup, is set to letterbox or 16:9 or auto detect?
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kndy

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Re: Watching silent films on a widescreen television

PostThu Apr 08, 2010 7:09 pm

frostwing wrote:Hi, i'm thinking about buying a widescreen tv and i'm wondering what it's like watching a silent film on one.


It's very good... But in terms of silents, so far...they have been very good. I was testing a few to see if I can take some pictures but noticed many were 4:3 (so there would be black bars on the sides).

Note: These are not photos with the best lighting...I was taking quick shots and thus the yellow bars on some of the images.

Here is Eureka!/MOC's "City Girl":

Image

Kino's Blu-ray of "The General":

Image

Warners "Safety Last":

Image

Pandora's Box

Image

Kino's "It":

Image

Kino's "Her Night of Romance":

Image


Eureka/MoC's "Sunrise" Blu:

Image
Last edited by kndy on Fri Apr 09, 2010 6:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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silentfilm

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PostFri Apr 09, 2010 11:26 am

kndy wrote:
silentfilm wrote:I have a Sony Bravia TV and Sony BDP-360 BluRay, and it drives me crazy because DVD's automatically stretch instead of pillar-box. I've figured out that it is not the TV, because 4:3 BluRay's play just fine. It seems to stretch 4:3 DVDs, and I hate seeing everyone fat and short.

I've tried just about every setting on the DVD player and I can't figure it out. The TV has a nice setting on it to show 4:3 as 4:3, and it works just fine for cable television.


By any chance is your Blu-ray hooked up to a receiver which is then hooked up to your TV? Is it hooked up via HDMI?

But in terms of the stretching, on your player setup, is set to letterbox or 16:9 or auto detect?


Yes, my BD player is hooked into a Sony receiver and then uses an HDMI cable to go to the TV. I guess I'll have to poke around the receiver setup again. My player is not stretching, because 4:3 bluray discs are properly displayed in 4:3 pillarbox.
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WaverBoy

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Re: Watching silent films on a widescreen television

PostFri Apr 09, 2010 1:14 pm

frostwing wrote:Hi, i'm thinking about buying a widescreen tv and i'm wondering what it's like watching a silent film on one.


You're watching SAFETY LAST! and IT in the wrong aspect ratio; they should be 4x3 as well, not stretched and squeezed in 16x9. In fact, almost all films before 1953 are in 4x3, or 1.37:1 (1.33:1 on standard definition TVs if not windowboxed). There are exceptions of course, such as THE BAT WHISPERS (1930), and others which are described in the Widescreen Silents thread on this board.
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greta de groat

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PostFri Apr 09, 2010 1:37 pm

Ah, auto-detect--that's the setting i'm looking for. Do all players and TVs have this? Sounded logical to me, but the HD monitor we have hooked up at work (Element) shows only "normal, full, wide." Full and wide seem to both be wide, but wide crops slightly at top and bottom. The DVD player (Phillips) has "4:3 Pan Scan, 4:3 letterbox, 16:9), but it doesn't seem to make a difference what this is set on (the only DVD i have handy is a Simpsons episode from season 19 which is freezing anyway--not sure which aspect ratio it is but looks right at 4:3). I tried the blu-ray player hooked up to the same TV (Insignia), but when i press teh button on the remote that says "setup" it says "prohibited." (i tried display but that tells me how many minutes have elapsed). I then went back to the Element monitor remote and when i press P Size it now tells me "feature not available."

So if there's an auto-detect on any of these 3 machines, i don't know how to access it. No wonder people just leave it on one setting, this is crazy! Often here we get DVDs with no aspect ratio listed on the packaging and we're supposed to record the aspect ratio in our records. For region 0 and 1 we put them in the computer and the program window jumps put to the right ratio if it's anamorphic. But region 2 videos we have to look at on the region free DVD player and we can't tell what the aspect ratio is supposed to be except by clicking through the settings and eyeballing it.

I do have a little program on the computer that looks at a disc and tells me whether it's 4:3 or 16:9, but i'm finding lots that are 4:3 but when you look at it it's really letterboxed. So that's not terribly helpful.


greta
Greta de Groat
Unsung Divas of the Silent Screen
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat
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Nick_M

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PostFri Apr 09, 2010 2:50 pm

My player is not stretching, because 4:3 bluray discs are properly displayed in 4:3 pillarbox.


I'm pretty sure black pillars are encoded into the video file, much like bars are with wider-than-1.85 movies. So, when you look at the BDs of Sunrise and The General, you're actually looking at a 1.78 image with a square picture pasted in the middle.
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kndy

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PostFri Apr 09, 2010 4:26 pm

greta de groat wrote:Ah, auto-detect--that's the setting i'm looking for. Do all players and TVs have this?
greta


Greetings Greta,

Most of them do by turning on the DVD player (try it without the DVD inside) and you will get a menu for setup for video. And a lot of people don't know this but if you have a progressive DVD player, you want that one on "on" or "enabled".

But for settings, I know that mine asks for 4:3, 16:9 or auto-detect.
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Claus H.

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PostSat Apr 10, 2010 12:56 am

Panasonic 58-inch 1080 Plasma with Playstation 3 hooked via HDMI.

1.1:20, 1:1.33 and 1:1.37 Academy, 1:1.66 and 1:1.85 flat, 2:35 and 2:55 Anamorphic, and "Smilebox" for "How the West Was Won" (the last being the best compromise for that format on a flat screen.)

I cannot, will not, run films with the wrong aspect ratio. If the DVD is pre-masked incorrectly, I won't watch it.
I have lived through the mutilations done by commercial tv when it was 1:1.33, and the 'pan-and-scan' butchery done on VHS tape copies. That was enough. (The only, inevitable, exception is running 'Scope in 16mm as the 1:2.66 ratio is fixed in that format, nothing doing.)

Now we have the tools to run it right digitally, and people don't care...????
If they don't like seeing it 'right', they will have to watch elsewhere.
And I will not stay and watch a fine film run in blown-up "chop" mode, even for a casual evening.

Don't get me wrong; I am a generous host, and I love sharing my films, but my respect for the art of the filmmaker is well above the need to accomodate destructive silliness such as "zoom" just because people actively object to seeing things correctly.
Claus.
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