DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

Post news stories and home video release announcements here.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 6659
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostSun Jun 07, 2015 1:59 pm

Here's an email I had forwarded to me:

"> I am delighted to let you all know that the only known original non-subtitled original nitrate 35MM release print of DANCING PIRATE is now in our possession, thanks to Wade Williams and two others. We will master it on a modified Spirit with wet-gate capabiity in HD next week. The print has no splices and is in surprisingly good condition. The Australian collector whe reluctantly parted it as part of a complicated transaction, first transferred it to SD DVD on what we think was an old RCA film chain, retaining one copy for himself and delivering the others to Wade, who turned them over to us. Our expert, Jim Markovic of Hyper Cube Media, screened the DVD and opined that after cleaning, wet-gate treatment to fill in surface scratches, transferring and digital adjustments, it will make a spectacular HD master; the cleaning will alse bring the Western Electric track back to original clarity. We are in discussions with an archive for a full theatrical restoration, using a backwards-engineered cyan strip made from the print and our two original red and blue negative strips. What a special event a 35MM screening of this and BECKY SHARP would be!
>
> Special thanks to David Pierce for his research into what it probably was (based on some digital photos of a few frames) before I went to Kansas City to inspect it and hand-carry it back. It was printed on Kodak Nitrate stock (with the curved-end perforations) with a dot L edge code, which we believe indicates it came from Technicolor's Canadian facility.
>
> Next, we have to find a print of WE ACCUSE!
>
> Alex Kogan"
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
http://www.amazon.com/Edward-Lorusso/e/ ... 203&sr=8-1
Offline
User avatar

Ray Faiola

  • Posts: 931
  • Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 10:18 am
  • Location: Ellenville, NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jun 08, 2015 5:47 am

That's fantastic! I have a gorgeous 16mm B&W print, struck from a 35mm negative. And I have the Vintage Video VHS tape of the CineColor reissue print. It will be great to finally see this in its original glory. Maybe not a great film, but one that is a lot of fun and certainly an important part of Technicolor's history.
Classic Film Scores on CD
http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com
Offline

BGM

  • Posts: 192
  • Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:50 am
  • Location: Butte, Montana

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jun 08, 2015 5:33 pm

Yippee!!!! I am very glad that an original Technicolor print has surfaced. It is noteworthy since it is the first 3 color Technicolor musical, an early Rodgers and Hart score and in IMO a charming film. Now maybe in a nice clear full color print we can finally be able to catch Rita Hayworth in the dance numbers!
Offline
User avatar

David Alp

  • Posts: 873
  • Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:58 am

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jun 08, 2015 5:58 pm

Incredible news. Isn't it of noteworthy interest the amount of material that keeps being found in Australia and New Zealand. I wonder if what they say is true; that Australia was the "end of the line" and so they didn't really bother to return it to the U.S?
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2599
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jun 08, 2015 7:35 pm

David Alp wrote:Incredible news. Isn't it of noteworthy interest the amount of material that keeps being found in Australia and New Zealand. I wonder if what they say is true; that Australia was the "end of the line" and so they didn't really bother to return it to the U.S?


I prefer to think there were more film aficionados and connoisseurs living in Oz! :D
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline

Mark Zimmer

  • Posts: 250
  • Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2015 3:16 pm

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jun 09, 2015 3:49 pm

Wait....how exactly are they expecting to get an HD master off a SD DVD?
Online
User avatar

Robert W

  • Posts: 131
  • Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 4:12 pm
  • Location: Canada

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jun 09, 2015 4:21 pm

I believe what they are saying is that Jim Markovic screened the DVD transfer the collector made of his print to get a rough idea of the visual condition , and based his comments on what he felt will be required when transferring the 35mm to high definition.
It does say quite clearly that they have recovered a splice-free 35mm print.
Offline
User avatar

Harold Aherne

  • Posts: 1627
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:08 pm
  • Location: North Dakota

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jun 09, 2015 7:39 pm

Dancing Pirate has been an object of fascination for me for almost 20 years since first reading about it in Bob Thomas' Selznick. The fact that it was almost never talked about, one way or the other, only added to its mystique. After seeing the Cinecolor print (which Nostalgia Family Video was selling on VHS during the late 1990s), some of that enthusiasm was dampened, but re-watching parts of it recently leads me to think that it perhaps wasn't so bad.

Neither of the two Rodgers & Hart songs made any impression, it seems, but Charles Collins is certainly likeable enough. Both its leading lady and its director (Steffi Duna and Lloyd Corrigan) had also worked on the first Pioneer production, something about a cockroach.

-HA
Offline

BGM

  • Posts: 192
  • Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:50 am
  • Location: Butte, Montana

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostWed Jun 10, 2015 8:57 am

I agree that the Selznick book piqued my interest years ago about Dancing Pirate and also my passion for early Technicolor. I am sure that much care was taken for visually emphasizing certain colors and effects just as care was taken in La Cucaracha and Becky Sharp. This is really evident in the way that the dance numbers are staged. I am willing to bet that there are flashes of color in the dancers costumes that will give those scenes new "life" when seen in full color. It was interesting that TCM had what was listed as "restored" color DVD for sale on their website-I bought it....it was in Cinecolor-decent print but bad sound-at least the cover was a great copy of the original poster.
Offline
User avatar

Mike Gebert

Site Admin

  • Posts: 5464
  • Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:23 pm
  • Location: Chicago

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostWed Jun 10, 2015 11:29 am

Incredible news. Isn't it of noteworthy interest the amount of material that keeps being found in Australia and New Zealand. I wonder if what they say is true; that Australia was the "end of the line" and so they didn't really bother to return it to the U.S?


Certainly could be the case; it's the same reason so many things have been found in Prague, last stop for European distribution.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
Offline
User avatar

FrankFay

  • Posts: 3136
  • Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:48 am
  • Location: Albany NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostWed Jun 10, 2015 1:48 pm

Harold Aherne wrote:Dancing Pirate has been an object of fascination for me for almost 20 years since first reading about it in Bob Thomas' Selznick. The fact that it was almost never talked about, one way or the other, only added to its mystique. After seeing the Cinecolor print (which Nostalgia Family Video was selling on VHS during the late 1990s), some of that enthusiasm was dampened, but re-watching parts of it recently leads me to think that it perhaps wasn't so bad.

Neither of the two Rodgers & Hart songs made any impression, it seems, but Charles Collins is certainly likeable enough. Both its leading lady and its director (Steffi Duna and Lloyd Corrigan) had also worked on the first Pioneer production, something about a cockroach.

-HA


Many years back it turned out that a poster on AMS was a nephew / great nephew of Charles Collins. There was a great age difference & he recalled him as an elderly man who didn't speak much. He regretted that he didn't have the opportunity to ask him questions.

http://cache4.asset-cache.net/gc/329853 ... uYlA%3D%3D
Eric Stott
Offline
User avatar

Brooksie

  • Posts: 2574
  • Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2010 6:41 pm
  • Location: Portland, Oregon via Sydney, Australia

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostWed Jun 10, 2015 2:21 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:
Incredible news. Isn't it of noteworthy interest the amount of material that keeps being found in Australia and New Zealand. I wonder if what they say is true; that Australia was the "end of the line" and so they didn't really bother to return it to the U.S?


Certainly could be the case; it's the same reason so many things have been found in Prague, last stop for European distribution.


I've always thought this is why so many Vitaphone disks turn up in Australia. By the time they reached that point in the distribution cycle they were already obsolete tech, and not worth Warner Bros' trouble to retrieve.

Some rural areas were still playing silents well into the 1930s, and I suspect some areas would not have converted were it not for the major studios officially withdrawing silents from distribution in the mid 1930s. Again, there would have been a lot of redundant and supposedly valueless prints floating around.

There was also the phenomenon of the travelling showman that was so pervasive in Australia. It appears that the exhibitors sometimes bought prints outright rather than renting them (or perhaps neglected to return them after long runs), and some of the discoveries have come from the collections of former showmen or their families.
Offline

moviepas

  • Posts: 961
  • Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:51 am

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostThu Jun 11, 2015 3:55 am

Prints in Australia. One such traveling exhibitor was Adelaide-domiciled Cliff Howe and he bought 16mm prints from me in the 1970s and wrote often. He would send me paper clippings he did not want returned. He send lots to Classic Images or their earlier names and Sam Rubin used his clippings for page fillers in many editions. Who knows what happened to prints he had and I assumed he was very old then in the 1970s.

Many prints went to BB(or similar name) Chemicals in the Melbourne inner suburb of Collingwood. Old time collectors told me that they never saw MGM 35mm prints go there. A group of collectors had a deal going and each would steal a reel for batch of prints of the same title and between them they had the complete print. As for selling 35mm reels later they were cheaper compared to 16mm because few would have had 35mm equipment in their homes. Many Fox color musicals were involved. There were fires of these prints in private hands and one house did go up with Fox nitrate color musicals. In the end Police got involved and court cases ensued. One friend was involved with his dad and although they ended in court the dad did burn prints they had which included what became a rare Canadian western that the Canadians were looking for thru Classic Images, in the 1980s, I think. I remember the collector telling me that his dad burnt a print of that film amongst others. This collector stole bound annual volumes of Hoyts Screen News from the 1930s which he took when he worked for them and later for another exchange or two. He would bring me a volume to read and then give me another when I had finished. I have no idea what happened to him or the volumes. I did get given other books he had and some 16mm prints like the Universal feature cut-down reels WC Fields, A&C etc.

The fire brigade has also been responsible for collections being demolished and they getting to those nitrates before the NFSA. As for Fox, by the 1970s they were sending used prints to the dumps with a lawyer who watched as reels were axed and then had a form signed this had been done.
Offline
User avatar

countryslicker

  • Posts: 104
  • Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 11:14 pm
  • Location: rural eastern Victoria Australia

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostSat Jun 13, 2015 4:34 pm

Brooksie wrote:There was also the phenomenon of the travelling showman that was so pervasive in Australia. It appears that the exhibitors sometimes bought prints outright rather than renting them (or perhaps neglected to return them after long runs), and some of the discoveries have come from the collections of former showmen or their families.


A movie worth seeing is "The Picture Show Man" (1977) about a showman trying to keep up with his rival (Rod Taylor) bringing movies to rural 1920's Australia.

I'm curious as to whether similar movie showmen travelled around rural 1920's USA.
Offline
User avatar

FrankFay

  • Posts: 3136
  • Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:48 am
  • Location: Albany NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostSat Jun 13, 2015 8:30 pm

countryslicker wrote:
Brooksie wrote:There was also the phenomenon of the travelling showman that was so pervasive in Australia. It appears that the exhibitors sometimes bought prints outright rather than renting them (or perhaps neglected to return them after long runs), and some of the discoveries have come from the collections of former showmen or their families.


A movie worth seeing is "The Picture Show Man" (1977) about a showman trying to keep up with his rival (Rod Taylor) bringing movies to rural 1920's Australia.

I'm curious as to whether similar movie showmen travelled around rural 1920's USA.


In the very rural areas, yes. Not to be confused with traveling operators who showed things like "The Pace That Kills"
Eric Stott
Offline

moviepas

  • Posts: 961
  • Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:51 am

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostSun Jun 14, 2015 3:47 am

Picture Showmen. I enjoy the Australian film, The Picture Man, which has not made it to Blu Ray yet. To get it out there Australia's first official color feature, Jedda(Charles Chauvel, 1955) is due out on Blu Ray at the end of the month. I was hoping that they would go Blu and there is a DVD release. Earlier Chauvel films have been only issued on DVD last year. It was made in Gevacolor which was processed in London, with nightly flights out of Northern Australia with the footage. The female star spend many years as an Anglican nun in a convert in the adjoining suburb to me until she left to get married and go to the missions in Northern Territory. This native Australian lady used her sister's name as her stage name.

Getting back to Picture Showmen in USA, I seem to remember maybe in the 1970s that some man in Florida was selling a video compiled from his traveling show. It was advertised in The Classic Film Collector(Classic Images today).

We did have cameramen going to country towns to make a quicky piece of film involving the local folk and quickly processed the film to screen for these people and get their production money back, if possible. I have seen a couple but that was about 1978. I had a feeling a similar thing happened in USA.
Offline
User avatar

s.w.a.c.

  • Posts: 1610
  • Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
  • Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jun 16, 2015 9:18 am

We're getting a bit off-topic, but further to The Picture Show Man, there's a domestic DVD from Scorpion available through Amazon, but it appears to be a full-screen (possibly open matte) transfer. If you have a multi-region player, it'd be better to get the Australian DVD with a new widescreen transfer, audio commentary, interview with Rod Taylor and theatrical trailer. It's only $10 Australian dollars, which isn't a bad deal.

You can pre-order Jedda from the same dealer, I'm very curious to see it, and see how the Northern Territory of 1955 compares to my trip there in 2010.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2554
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: DANCING PIRATE (1936) found

PostTue Jun 23, 2015 3:23 pm

Very interesting re DANCING PIRATE. After thinking it was a lost film, found a copy in a local charity shop which was pretty hard going. I hadn't realised it was a Cinecolor print, although perhaps I could have guessed, knowing the fate of BECKY SHARP in the 1940s. Since then, it has been a choice between a rough colour copy or a crisp b/w white one. Nice to know we will be able to see it in its former glory once again...
Offline

Marr&Colton

  • Posts: 699
  • Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 4:17 pm

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jul 07, 2015 12:25 pm

What I would like to know is WHY such influential and intelligent people involved with Pioneer Pictures chose such an
inane (my opinion) screenplay for this movie? At least BECKY SHARP had an interesting plot and excellent sets and art direction. DANCING PIRATE seemed to ignore all the good things about their first feature. Was the budget so weak for this movie that no major stars could appear? I've got this in both the B&W reissue and the Cinecolor transfer, but either way it certainly doesn't entertain---unless audiences would accept anything in color back then. This begs the further question--is it any wonder Pioneer Pictures folded?
Last edited by Marr&Colton on Mon Jan 16, 2017 8:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Offline
User avatar

FrankFay

  • Posts: 3136
  • Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:48 am
  • Location: Albany NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jul 07, 2015 1:25 pm

I think that Charles Collins is one of those performers who comes close but doesn't quite click as a star- his little dance around the room as he blows the candles out is charming, but he's rather flat as an actor. Still, it's nice that he was captured on film- he wasn't in much else.
Eric Stott
Offline

FilmGauge

  • Posts: 65
  • Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:43 pm
  • Location: Connecticut

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jan 16, 2017 6:48 pm

Alex, Is there any update information on DANCING PIRATE? I am anxious to buy a DVD of this restored 3 strip print.
Offline

All Darc

  • Posts: 1061
  • Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:13 pm
  • Location: Brazil

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostMon Jan 16, 2017 9:09 pm

B&W film:

Color clip:

I didn't knew very early technicolor dye transfer prints could look so good (relativelly given the age, the 30's chemicals and dyes). If a youtube video have this sharpness and details for shadows, it's probably a very well made 35mm print, considering the film materials available in the 30's.

It's curious cause many FOX technicolor films, which camera negatives were destroyed after copied to CRI FIlm (bad for shadow details) survived in original prints, but the restoration team said the original photography was lost due lost of camera negative and bad quality of CRI master made from camera negative. It gives the impression that a original techniclor print, even in digital era, do not ensure the surviving of the technicolor film's original photography.


I hope noone says that prefers the "original" B&W version. :wink:
Last edited by All Darc on Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:37 am, edited 2 times in total.
Keep thinking...

Image
Offline
User avatar

bigshot

  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 2:59 pm

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jan 17, 2017 12:44 am

Modern transfers of original 3 strip negatives can look a lot better than vintage film prints, because modern technology allows for more precise alignment of the 3 negatives. There are some jaw droopingly beautiful 3 strip Technicolor films on blu-ray.
Offline

All Darc

  • Posts: 1061
  • Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:13 pm
  • Location: Brazil

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jan 17, 2017 7:57 am

Oh, so this was already the top transfer possible...
I was imagining this was a basic transfer in some standart HD telecine, to help atract interest and founds for a complete restoration.
But maybe they can get a bit sharper if they try to use Ultra resolution Technology (used in Singin in The Rain) to realign the Red/Green/Blue channels with more precision than DYE transfer could get in the 30's.

Gulliver Travel's (1939) was restored from a original DYE Transfer print, with good results, but it was mostly from a print made in 1957, so the film stock and technicolor technology was quite better than in 1936.
http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDRevie ... lu-ray.htm

Anyway, as I said, I don't understand why film restorers said claims FOX films now have the original protography lost, just because camera negatives was destroyed (after copied to color reversal film-CRI), even if original dye transfer prints still exist and can, by advanced digital scanning technology, have details (textures and dynamics range) extracted much better to produce new prints than chemical lab work could do.
Isn't a original DYE transfer print enough to represent original photography ???

The restorations of Leave Her to Heaven, Drums Along Mohank, for example, used many sources, CRI masters made from camera negative, B&W channels film masters made from the CRI, and reference original dye transfer prints. But the restorers and the review said cleary that the original photography of both was lost despite all digital efforts and masters.

I suspect the CRI masters failed to preserve some characteristics that the original DYE transfer prints have, but the digital work was unable to combine such characteristics of the dye transfer prints with the sharpest images of the CRI film.

FOX in the past made a huge crimes against technicolor films. They copied it to CRI (that is quite prone to fadding and have poor rendering of shadows) and burned the original camera negatives. Most if not all technicolor films by FOX have no surviving original camera negative today. One of the most stupid "film preservation" approach ever made.

bigshot wrote:Modern transfers of original 3 strip negatives can look a lot better than vintage film prints, because modern technology allows for more precise alignment of the 3 negatives. There are some jaw droopingly beautiful 3 strip Technicolor films on blu-ray.
Keep thinking...

Image
Offline
User avatar

bigshot

  • Posts: 767
  • Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 2:59 pm

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostTue Jan 17, 2017 10:50 pm

Hind sight is 20-20
Offline

All Darc

  • Posts: 1061
  • Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:13 pm
  • Location: Brazil

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostWed Jan 18, 2017 2:33 pm

So the red and blue technicolor strips negative survived. Interesting...

If I understood righ and the red and blue negatives really survived, it's possible, in theory, to perform a digital restoration that would bring this film to be nearly as good as a film restored from the 3 strip camera negatives, combining the red and blue from câmera negative and extrating the green channel from the print.
The red record is the sharpest one, in a technicolor camera system.

Edited: Confirmed, the Dancing Pirate it's a similar case to Beck Sharp:

http://www.filmsaroundtheworld.com/Tech ... Firsts.php

Two camera negatives survived, red and blue record.

Not sure from what the B&W TV print was shot, from a single strip record (red, green, blue) or from a technicolor print.

drednm wrote:Here's an email I had forwarded to me:

"> ... using a backwards-engineered cyan strip made from the print and our two original red and blue negative strips. "
Keep thinking...

Image
Offline
User avatar

Ray Faiola

  • Posts: 931
  • Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 10:18 am
  • Location: Ellenville, NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostThu Jan 19, 2017 9:24 am

The B&W prints of THE DANCING PIRATE made in the 50's (I have one) were printed from the magenta negative.
Classic Film Scores on CD
http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com
Offline

All Darc

  • Posts: 1061
  • Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:13 pm
  • Location: Brazil

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostThu Jan 19, 2017 11:59 am

So you refer about the green strip negative (magenta is the oposite color of green), right? Or by Magenta do you refer about the red record?

Sometimes people confused, even a article confused calling the green record of cyan (greenish blue) but cyan is the oposite color of red. Technicolor have red/gree/blue strips (to individual catch each RGB basic colors), and when it's prepared for a print they dye the respective prints ( red/green/blue) with oposite color (Cya/magenta/yellow).

Image

The B&W print it's of poor resolution and contrast, but let's supose it's really the green record, and let's supose the techniclor original Dy tranfer print wasn't found. There would still be a chance to restore the film. The B&W print could be used in digital simulation combining with the red and blue negatives strips (converted to positive) just to find the real colors of the sets, characters and objects.
Once the colors for each thing is found they could use the high definition images of the red and grren negatives to generate a new green negative. In theory its possible, using something like computer colorization, but instead of just paint color spectrum colors above specific áreas of the image, it would be used to bright or darker grayscale spectrum of specific áreas (skin, hair, clothes, sky etc...) of image, generating a new HD green record.

I don't know about a case where such thing was done, but in theory it's possible. Since only one channel would be recreated, the final result would be much more convicing and natural than a modern film colorization look.

It could also be used to turn a film originally recorded in cinecolor into a full color pallet, but the accuracy would have some few guess choices here and there in this case, since cinecolor pallete despite some references about how a given color would look in cinecolor, it don't work for all colors as some few different colors can look the same in cinecolor.

Ray Faiola wrote:The B&W prints of THE DANCING PIRATE made in the 50's (I have one) were printed from the magenta negative.
Keep thinking...

Image
Offline

Yannek

  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:09 am

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostThu Mar 02, 2017 11:43 am

Years ago I came upon a production file from Pioneer Productions for a film with a working title FOOTLOOSE. I wisely held onto the folder that included a rental agreement from Max Factor, the company providing wigs for the entire cast, cast and shooting schedule. Principal photography began on 14 January 1936 and finished 7 March 1936, a total of 47 days. Leading players finished their scenes in February but Charles Collins was the last leading player closing out on 7 March 1936.

While Rita Hayworth's uncle, Jose Canisno, and his troupe make an appearance, Rita does not appear. This information came from a Hayworth book whose author included some imaginary credits for Rita now considered factual . Rita made six screen tests in early 1933, generating little interest in the 14 year old. It was her dancing appearance with her father at the Hotel Caliente in Tijuana,where she was seen by Fox studios executive, Winfield Sheehan, and hired for a solo dance with Gary Leon, another Spanish dancer, while her father, at age 40, coached her dancing. on 25 January, 1935, Fox, pleased with her work, signed her to a long-term contract that was not renewed in January 1936. However, Fox exercised its contractual right to her services for one additional film, HUMAN CARGO, for a period of not more than 60 days. HUMAN CARGO began filming the same time as FOOTLOOSE (Released as THE DANCING PIRATE).

Here are some accurate cast credits from the file for supporting players and dancers that do not appear on IMDB:
June Horne, Emily Renard, Jolane Reynolds, Maude Taylor, Inez Cecil, Loretta Puente, Alice Stombs, Rosita Granada, Jeanne Francis, Marjorie Moore (later Marjorie Reynolds), Martha Sage, Lita Cortez, Gwen Kenyon, Carson Helene, Betty Mann, Netha Blair, Jean Vernon, Geane Greer. Maxine Nash, Agnes Anderson, Lupe Morino, Dolores Duian, Bob Mack, Nina Roberts, Jean Askerton, Bobby Woods, Francis Diels, Jean Joyce, Charlotte Carona, Agnes De Camp, Paula DeCarlo, Carmen Roeske, Aloha Porter and Jimmy Dime.
Offline
User avatar

Ray Faiola

  • Posts: 931
  • Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 10:18 am
  • Location: Ellenville, NY

Re: DANCING PIRATE ((1936) found

PostThu Mar 02, 2017 4:42 pm

I have the original 1936 pressbook, and the cover is an elaborate fold-out shaped like a treasure chest. Ah, those were the days1
Classic Film Scores on CD
http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com
Next

Return to Talkie News

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Robert W and 7 guests