NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic movies

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NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic movies

PostWed Aug 16, 2017 7:33 pm

http://nypost.com/2017/08/16/millennials-dont-really-care-about-classic-movies/

Millennials don’t really care about classic movies

By SWNS

August 16, 2017 | 3:20pm

Millennials don’t really care about classic movies
composite; iStockphoto
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It appears that the “Golden Age of Cinema” has lost its sheen to the young over the years, as millennials are turning their back on classic movies.

A new study finds that less than a quarter of millennials have watched a film from start to finish that was made back in the 1940s or 50s and only a third have seen one from the 1960s.

Thirty percent of young people also admit to never having watched a black and white film all the way through – as opposed to 85 percent of those over 50 – with 20 percent branding the films “boring.”

A new survey polling 1,000 millennials and 1,000 Americans over the age of 50 conducted by FYE.com, reveals that looking back into the history of cinema isn’t the preference of youth today, with millennials exponentially more likely to have binged on films of the last 15 years than on classics from bygone eras.

Less than half of millennials have seen the likes of “Gone with the Wind,” “The Sound of Music,” “To Kill a Mockingbird,” or even “The Shawshank Redemption” — rated the greatest film of all time on IMDB.

Only 28 percent have seen “Casablanca,” 16 percent have watched “Once Upon a Time in the West” and only a measly 12 percent have seen the Hitchcock classic “Rear Window” – though the director’s “Psycho” fares moderately better at a rate of 38 percent.

On the other side of things, some over-50s appear to have the tendency to stick to their old classics and ignore new cinema altogether with one in ten admitting they aren’t sure if they have seen a film newer than 2010 – and eight percent straight up saying no, they have not.

And while millennials believe that movies have only gotten more entertaining over time, 30 percent admit to having felt social pressure to lie that they have seen an old classic in its entirety – compared to just three percent of over-50s.

“There is so much out there in terms of classic cinema that sometimes it can seem overwhelming, but today it is easier than ever to catch up on the classics – or the newest blockbusters – in whatever form you may prefer,” says Bill Miller, VP of DVD/Blu-ray Sales at FYE. His company is focusing on “engaging the fan that’s very loyal.” That can mean looking at niches and franchises with rabid followings and bringing in more products in those areas.

There is even a disparity in genres between the generations, with millennials twice as likely to choose horror as their top favorite and over-50s more than twice as likely to pick westerns.

Millennials are also twice as likely to not be bothered by too much gore or too much nudity than the older group.

But the older generation and the younger one don’t differ on every front, as the research reveals that when it comes to what exactly makes a movie a classic, they are in complete agreement. Both say that the top qualities of a classic film are a great plot, staying relatable over time and containing memorable scenes or quotes.

As for how the different ages enjoy their films, it appears that streaming services are still largely a favorite of the young, with 72 percent of millennials naming it as a common way they watch movies, as opposed to just 30 percent of people over 50.

Younger people are also more likely to enjoy films in the theater, on DVD or Blu-ray, or illegally downloaded online. They were only topped by over-50s when it comes to watching films on cable or TV.

Millennials are also considerably more finicky when it comes to picture quality, as they were found to be twice as likely as over-50s to say that they tend to only watch things in HD.

“We want to offer fans movies they love in any format, DVD, Blu-ray, 3D, and 4K and whatever may come next” Miller said. “We have taken steps to almost reinvent ourselves, tying into a lot of the product categories and franchises that our customers have loved, expanding into consumer products that appeal to millennials… while also going after the fan who has been a customer for a long time and taking them to the next level.”
Top 10 most common movies millennials have seen

“The Lion King” 81.60 percent
“Forrest Gump” 74.60 percent
“Back to the Future” 66.80 percent
“The Dark Knight” 66.50 percent
“The Matrix” 63.20 percent
“The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” 60.90 percent
“Terminator 2: Judgement Day” 59.20 percent
“The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King” 59 percent
“The Silence of the Lambs” 54.90 percent
“The Godfather” 55 percent

Top 10 most common movies over-50’s have seen

“Forrest Gump” 84.30 percent
“Back to the Future” 80 percent
“The Silence of the Lambs” 71 percent
“It’s a Wonderful Life” 70.50 percent
“The Godfather” 69.90 percent
“Raiders of the Lost Ark” 69.30 percent
“Saving Private Ryan” 68.30 percent
“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” 66.40 percent
“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” 65.90 percent
“The Green Mile 65.60 percent
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostWed Aug 16, 2017 10:10 pm

I presume "Millennial" is new-type speak for someone born at the turn of this century? (I can't keep up with all these new buzz words. :o )

My son, some time back, issued an edict. He stated that if he was watching any of my DVD's he didn't want to be inflicted with anything in black and white or not pertaining to the current century. He is a bit older than a "Millennial" though.

I think that the problem is that the generations coming after those of us now in our 60's and 70's is that they haven't been brought up with the same abilities in the realm of imagination. They had television instead of the wireless and colour instead of black and white. Everything else also seems to have been created without any requirement necessary to tax the brain more than necessary. We thus made a lot of our own fun. I feel sorry that the young can get so easily bored.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:00 am

Fortunately, both my kids - 31 and 35 (in November) - have a healthy appreciation of classic films and classic comedy.

But to the generation creep - even TCM folds in more and more 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's and occasional 2000's films in its scheduling. And, on the personal side, we in the soundtrack production business are finding our audiences for Golden Age film scores dying off at an alarming rate. It won't be long before Steiner, Tiomkin, Rozsa, Waxman and Young will be complete question marks to the music-buying public. Bernard Herrmann will last if only because of his association with Hitchcock. But then...how long will Hitchcock's appreciation last?!?!
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:58 am

None of what the Post reports will come as a surprise to any of us here on NitrateVille. We have plenty of threads in which the same observations came up in discussion. We may prefer old movies but that doesn't mean we are blind to the truth that we are a constantly shrinking niche.

Not to mention the compulsory "Kids these days!!!" old-fart rants that have been going on since the time of Socrates.*

What I do find disconcerting is the younger generation's absolute disinterest in anything at all that is older than them. Not just movies but also books, music, history itself, etc. Youth have always been interested mainly in their own generation's products, but previous "youth generations" were at least aware of the roots from which their products had grown. Growing up a Sixties hippie, listening to the Stones, Beatles, Animals, Who, etc. ("our" music) inspired us to look back at Fifties rock'n'roll and progressive jazz to see where this stuff had come from. Watching Brian De Palma movies took us back to Hitchcock. Reading Ken Kesey and Tom Wolfe took us back to Jack Kerouac and even Thomas Wolfe. Laughing with the Smothers Brothers made us seek out Mort Sahl and Lenny Bruce. I just don't see that same kind of "roots tracing" in younger people now.

* I'm currently reading There's No Answer To That!, the "autobiography" of Morecambe and Wise (ask your grandparents, kids), and it is one long snark about younger people having no talent, not being stars, not being willing to work, and not paying their dues. It was written about 40 years ago.

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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 6:31 am

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times...

My son was in drama in an arts-oriented high school. He saw La Dolce Vita, it changed his life. He wanted to see other things that dug as deep and flew as high. He wanted to share it with friends from the school.

It did not go over well. Myles and three hour black and white Italian movies became a joke.

But now he's off to an arts college. At some point in his life the sample size will be refined enough that he'll find people who can love Fellini, too.

To be honest this wasn't the only thing in life where he was an outlier. I'd make jambalaya from scratch, he'd take some to school, the kids would marvel that something like that would be whipped up for dinner at his house. Don't know what they eat but apparently it isn't scratch dinners like that.

So most people eat frozen entrees and watch things newly made. But some don't, and they have new ways to find each other, at least.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 6:40 am

As the phrase goes, "don't get me started."

:wink:
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 6:49 am

As a generation Y kid (I think? Born 1987) I have to say I get frustrated with these statistics. The issue is a lot more complex than people make it out to be.

For one thing, silent movies are a century old. How many baby boomers were enthusiastic and/or even mildly interested in the stuff that happened in the mid-late 1800s? History always attracts niche crowds especially the farther away we get from it. A lot of my peers are enthusiastic about 1960s & 1970s music, which may sound like a given to the generation that grew up with that stuff, but for us, it is something that happened 40/50 years ago!

Yes I think the easy access to technology has made our generation crave instant access and speed. Old movies are paced in a much slower way than modern movies, so they can be somewhat hard to take for eyes not trained to appreciate that. That can be overcome by early and repeated exposure either by parents or educators. But in a country which commonly pulls funding from schools, most often from arts programs, that isn't likely to happen.

It isn't that young people aren't capable of liking classic movies, but it isn't an inherent interest.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 7:17 am

Interesting. A lot of the comments would tend to suggest that I am the odd one out in some ways. Whilst my learned friend from my sister Dominion, Mr. Roots was cavorting to the likes of Cream, Stones and Boulders and other Kerfuffle, I was listening to Richard Tauber and Al Bowlly. I seemed to prefer those things that were out of reach of my time - and still do. I daresay this was a product of my up-bringing. I was lucky enough to be surrounded mostly by people much older than I - and they all being quite eloquent, used to paint word pictures for me of their salad days. I found these stories far more interesting than the boring pursuits of my peers.

Now I am getting even more lost as the mists of time swirl about me in ever diminishing circles but am content to bore the socks off most acquaintances talking about cable trams, cinema organs, silent pictures, wind-up gramophones, steam trains, propeller aeroplanes - and the great stars like Garbo and Gilbert, Keaton, Swansdn and other names no-one has usually ever heard of.

No doubt I will soon be placed in the green cart by white jacketed attendants and taken to a nice home for the bewildered - with its own bus stop. I will talk to people eager for my conversations for, by the morrow they will have forgotten it all and every day it will seem fresh.

Sad, isn't it...
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 7:52 am

Donald Binks wrote:No doubt I will soon be placed in the green cart by white jacketed attendants and taken to a nice home for the bewildered - with its own bus stop. I will talk to people eager for my conversations for, by the morrow they will have forgotten it all and every day it will seem fresh.

Sad, isn't it...

No, not necessarily; makes dimples in my cheeks, Don. Just think, at least you get to talk about what you like. Some people would just say TMI - too much info...
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 8:04 am

In many ways, the late 1950s and 1960s, when a lot of us were growing up, were a good time for being exposed to old media. Access through television meant that you could see big stars in their early appearances, and tv was still hungry enough for content to run the old stuff. Few people had color sets, so it was al b&w and the low resolution meant that 16 mm. Prints were the equal of anything produced for the idiot box. Although the Youth Culture fractured irremediably in that decade, we had plenty of opportunity to sample the old stuff. My folks kept the kitchen radio tuned to WNEW -- eleven three Oh in New York -- so I got that in my youth, even though it wasn't until my 30s that I began to listen to jazz in earnest; at least it wasn't a completely foreign language.

Nor should we despair. People often develop new interests after they grow up.

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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 8:05 am

There's no discussion on the methodology used for the survey, so it's hard to draw any conclusions on how valid it is. But even if we assume that the results are accurate, I don't think it's a reason for pessimism. Comparing it across disciplines, there are many fields that could be considered just as culturally essential as film, yet which not many people are passionate about or even conversant in their rudiments. Jazz, Greco-Roman mythology, Henry James' writing, the history of India, kabuki theatre -- all are hugely important in their own way, but they're probably going to attract only a minority of the public.

With every passing day, let alone year, more and more pop culture gets produced, and more and more becomes available. It's a double-edged sword because everything that becomes accessible has to compete with what's already out there. But I wouldn't despair, because (both on this board and on social media) there are young people quite passionate about older films, including obscure titles and performers. Numerically, they might never be as large as those who download the newest music concoctions. But I think they'll curate the history of film just as well as their predecessors did.

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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 8:16 am

For one thing, silent movies are a century old. How many baby boomers were enthusiastic and/or even mildly interested in the stuff that happened in the mid-late 1800s? History always attracts niche crowds especially the farther away we get from it. A lot of my peers are enthusiastic about 1960s & 1970s music, which may sound like a given to the generation that grew up with that stuff, but for us, it is something that happened 40/50 years ago!


Well, and I think that's something of a cultural constant— the age that fascinates is the one just out of reach, that is, starting from your parents' generation to a little further back, what seems in your day to be the age of innocence, bits of it still visible around as you grow up. Around World War II, it was the 1890s of Mother Wore Tights. In the 60s, it was the 20s of Thoroughly Modern Millie. In the 70s, it was the 50s of American Graffiti. And so on.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 8:20 am

My personal experience with discussing classic films with Millenials (people age 20-30):

Those who have studied film in college can and will appreciate John Ford's "Stagecoach", will be critical of classic film special effects due to the modern inundation of CGI in movies at the local multiplex, may find 1940's serial cliched and corny. Mention someone like Tom Tyler they won't know who on earth you are talking about.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 8:39 am

While I worked at my main job, at the same time I taught college age students for twelve years, retiring a couple of years ago. When I mentioned either Cagney or Bogart, most - let me repeat, MOST - had never even heard of them, let alone watched them on television or in the movies. I was shocked, but I also remembered back: I ran a film festival in college in 1969 where I showed several classic silent films. I'd never heard of Harold Lloyd until then - and I was 21 years old! - I'd never heard of Bebe Daniels - I'd never heard of Mabel Normand - and so on. I also had only seen silents run on TV in much faster than norm speeds. Oh, and I'd never seen "Casablanca", my favorite film of all time, before that showing. It was my first time. Just always remember: People in Nicholas Rowe's day (Nicholas who, you ask?) thought Shakespeare was so old-fashioned that Mr. Rowe re-wrote many of his plays in the new manner of his (Rowe's) day. He was a Poet Laureate of England in the eighteenth century. But - what goes around comes around. We'll see... Well, maybe WE won't see, but a few generations down...
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 12:47 pm

One of the most popular Youtube channels, called "React," sometimes has teenagers react to old things like rotary phones, old music, old computers, etc., and also outdated but relatively recent things like encyclopedias. Sometimes their ignorance is on full display, to the point that sometimes they say, "Please don't hate us! We're just kids!" But sometimes they do offer good, modern-day insights on certain old things, like this video on old TV cigarette commercials.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 3:17 pm

I'm not surprised at their findings. As someone approaching 70, I have fond memories of a much more decent and peaceful American society of the early to late 50s as well as developing an appreciation of great old movies as they were run on TV in the 50s, 60s & 70s.

In my weekly movie gatherings, I usually show nothing newer than 1956 or 57.

The last 2 or 3 generations growing up in the 80s, 90s and 2000s have little more to remember than violent karate movies, car chase movies, graphic horror movies and moronic youth comedies--on TV or in theatres. The vastly diminished moral teachings of these forms of "entertainment" have contributed to what we have now in everyday life.

No wonder we have youth who think violence is the only way to deal with conflict and guns in the urban setting are cool.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 4:13 pm

Marr&Colton wrote:I'm not surprised at their findings. As someone approaching 70, I have fond memories of a much more decent and peaceful American society of the early to late 50s as well as developing an appreciation of great old movies as they were run on TV in the 50s, 60s & 70s.

In my weekly movie gatherings, I usually show nothing newer than 1956 or 57.

The last 2 or 3 generations growing up in the 80s, 90s and 2000s have little more to remember than violent karate movies, car chase movies, graphic horror movies and moronic youth comedies--on TV or in theatres. The vastly diminished moral teachings of these forms of "entertainment" have contributed to what we have now in everyday life.

No wonder we have youth who think violence is the only way to deal with conflict and guns in the urban setting are cool.


Actually, as someone who grew up in the '90s and was in college during the early 2000s (and who was pretty much immersed in silent film by the age of 10), I found it to be a rich time for interesting new independent and world cinema, from the American indies and the possibilities afforded by digital tools for DIY filmmaking, both of which inspired me to make low-budget films of my own, to the arthouse cinema, both domestic and foreign, with directors like David Lynch, Gus Van Sant, Todd Haynes, Olivier Assays, Alexander Sokurov, Wong Kar Wai, and Hou Hsiao-hsien doing some of their best work, plus being able to see the final films of masters like Ingmar Bergman and Sidney Lumet in first-run, all of which contributed to my pursuing a career in independent film distribution today.

Sure, there was lots of junk. There always is in any decade. But it's those inspiring and influential films that made the biggest impact on me.

And "moral teachings" are the last thing I'd go to the movies for.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:09 pm

My mom showed me classic and silent film as early as 2 or 3. Now I'm 18 and we still enjoy sharing these films with others. The interesting thing was is that when I was shown a classic film it wasn't a history lesson. She enjoys classic film and she simply showed me these films without any context of what era they were from. Suddenly, to me at least, they weren't "classic films" they were just films.

I don't think newer movies have caused younger people to think that "guns in the urban setting are cool." Honestly I used to play with toy guns as a kid the way Harpo did in Monkey Business but that's another story. A lot of people my age tend to like what I show them, because they have strong respect for good acting, non-CGI effects, etc. Just look at the acting and shots in The Lobster with Colin Farrell or Silence by Martin Scorsese. A lot of younger people respect these works. The fact that it's new and current is what adds some extra excitement.

Silent and classic film isn't that far of a leap when you think about it, it just has to be approached in a way that makes it feel new. I never approach my friends and go,"I'm going to show you a silent film from a bygone era." I usually say,"There's this really cool actor, Buster Keaton we should watch this guys stuff." Honestly I come at it without the historical aspect because no one would care if I mentioned it that way. I try to remember what kind of excitement I would have if I lived in 1925, and Buster Keaton was a 30 year old man who was working on something that I didn't have any idea would become The General. That's what we miss today. It wasn't always a classic film, it was once new. If more younger people were exposed in this way I think we'd see a very different story.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:18 pm

luciano wrote: ...
Silent and classic film isn't that far of a leap when you think about it, it just has to be approached in a way that makes it feel new. I never approach my friends and go,"I'm going to show you a silent film from a bygone era." I usually say,"There's this really cool actor, Buster Keaton we should watch this guys stuff." Honestly I come at it without the the historical aspect because no one would care if I mentioned it that way. I try to remember what kind of excitement I would have if I lived in 1925, and Buster Keaton was a 30 year old man who was working on something that I didn't have any idea would become The General. That's what we miss today. It wasn't always a classic film, it was once new. If more younger people were exposed in this way I think we'd see a very different story.


I think you show a very healthy attitude. I generally dislike the term "classic" as that epithet usually appertains to either taste or the clique element who have come to believe they should like something. I know for example, that a lot of people like the films of Ingmar Bergman - and good on 'em. I find them an awful bore because, basically, I just don't understand 'em. I'm a bit like yourself in that I would mention to people that so and so is a jolly fine actor and one should look at his work - or that this particular film is something I find quite entertaining. The century in which it's made should be neither here nor there.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:25 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
luciano wrote: ...
Silent and classic film isn't that far of a leap when you think about it, it just has to be approached in a way that makes it feel new. I never approach my friends and go,"I'm going to show you a silent film from a bygone era." I usually say,"There's this really cool actor, Buster Keaton we should watch this guys stuff." Honestly I come at it without the the historical aspect because no one would care if I mentioned it that way. I try to remember what kind of excitement I would have if I lived in 1925, and Buster Keaton was a 30 year old man who was working on something that I didn't have any idea would become The General. That's what we miss today. It wasn't always a classic film, it was once new. If more younger people were exposed in this way I think we'd see a very different story.


I think you show a very healthy attitude. I generally dislike the term "classic" as that epithet usually appertains to either taste or the clique element who have come to believe they should like something. I know for example, that a lot of people like the films of Ingmar Bergman - and good on 'em. I find them an awful bore because, basically, I just don't understand 'em. I'm a bit like yourself in that I would mention to people that so and so is a jolly fine actor and one should look at his work - or that this particular film is something I find quite entertaining. The century in which it's made should be neither here nor there.


Absolutely agree. Love the mustache by the way.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostThu Aug 17, 2017 5:29 pm

luciano wrote:
Absolutely agree. Love the mustache by the way.


A friend lent it to me and I have forgotten to give it back to him.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 8:42 am

Donald Binks wrote:
luciano wrote:
Absolutely agree. Love the mustache by the way.


A friend lent it to me and I have forgotten to give it back to him.


It just grew on you, eh?

Jim
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 9:02 am

Marr&Colton wrote:I'm not surprised at their findings. As someone approaching 70, I have fond memories of a much more decent and peaceful American society of the early to late 50s as well as developing an appreciation of great old movies as they were run on TV in the 50s, 60s & 70s.

In my weekly movie gatherings, I usually show nothing newer than 1956 or 57.

The last 2 or 3 generations growing up in the 80s, 90s and 2000s have little more to remember than violent karate movies, car chase movies, graphic horror movies and moronic youth comedies--on TV or in theatres. The vastly diminished moral teachings of these forms of "entertainment" have contributed to what we have now in everyday life.

No wonder we have youth who think violence is the only way to deal with conflict and guns in the urban setting are cool.


I am approaching 70 too, and you have entirely different memories of the "decent and peaceful American society" than I do. And like Matt, I wouldn't dream of seeing any film for moral teaching. Not then, not now.

Besides the fact that I'm extremely tired of this "millenials are killing everything" trope that we get whiny news articles on every week (avocado toast, anyone?) I don't find millenials any less/more of anything than we were. It's a rarity to find people in my age group who like classic films and it always was. If you've attended a TCM Film Festival you'll see plenty of millenials, people of all ages, in fact. The audiences at Bologna and Pordenone include many young people. If anything, I'd say audiences for these events are growing.

There will always be that niche group of people who like classic films. But it is a niche audience, it is never going to be mainstream. I cannot work up much panic over that.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 9:13 am

I have a friend who teaches screenwriting at USC, and she finds it almost impossible to get her students to watch classic B/W films. A year or so ago, no one in the class was happy when she said she was going to show them STAGECOACH until George Lucas spoke to the class and recommended that they see it.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 9:38 am

There will always be that niche group of people who like classic films. But it is a niche audience, it is never going to be mainstream. I cannot work up much panic over that.


There was mass culture in a different way some years ago, but it's not like they were watching 60 year old films in the 1950s. It's worth noting that if you watched The Wizard of Oz on TV in 1970, say, it was only as old as Top Gun or Ferris Bueller's Day Off is now.

Now instead we have media of a thousand niches. The issue is not that more people are watching The Bachelor, that's inevitable, what matters is that at least some people are watching TCM. I generally agree that at well-run events that aren't just sheer nostalgia fests, you tend to see a decent-sized contingent of younger people who genuinely love classic films for how they're not precisely the same as modern movies. I think some things will fade, or already have— the taste for B westerns seems to be one you had to grow up with, say. But other things are better appreciated than they were decades ago because the audience is more discerning, because it has to be— you have to care more and choose more carefully to spend $20 on a movie than to simply catch it on the Million Dollar Movie.

As for morals, I think there are plenty of movies that imputed certain moral values, but I also firmly believe as Woody Allen said (and has occasionally demonstrated in his own work), "More great movies were made by people who thought they were making entertainment than by people who thought they were making Art."
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 3:41 pm

Millennials don’t really care about classic movies? Okay, but neither did Baby Boomers really care about silent movies, 78 rpm records, or Old Time Radio. Youths live in the present and look forward to their futures, not backward. Except for the lone geek, who harbors a secret fascination for antiques in any form, that attitude will probably go unchanged.

One consolation: millennials will soon be waxing nostalgic for Old Time Rap, Justin Bieber, Taylor Swift, Beyonce, and Leonardo DiCaprio, all of whom will soon be wrinkled and gray, and their children will be rolling their eyes back to white and whining about how pathetically old fashioned those ancient trite artists from a bygone era seem.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 5:20 pm

What amazes me is that old farts - even older than I am, such as Sir Paul McCartney and Sir "Mick" Jagger are still considered "cool" (is that the right word?) by the young.

The trouble with trying to get the young ones interested in old pictures is not the films themselves - but the number of avenues of choice that are available today. Look at television for instance. When that started there were only a limited number of stations - now with digitals, we have dozens - then there is Pay TV, streaming TV and "You Tube". It takes a month of Sundays to choose something to look at.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 5:30 pm

Donald Binks wrote:What amazes me is that old farts - even older than I am, such as Sir Paul McCartney and Sir "Mick" Jagger are still considered "cool" (is that the right word?) by the young.


I think the word is "hep".



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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 5:32 pm

boblipton wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:What amazes me is that old farts - even older than I am, such as Sir Paul McCartney and Sir "Mick" Jagger are still considered "cool" (is that the right word?) by the young.


I think the word is "hep".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7hxDaJhnYs" target="_blank

Bob


Thank you Uncle Bob. I am used to trying to speak English, so a lot of the modern day colloquialisms are lost on me.
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Re: NY Post: Millennials don’t really care about classic mov

PostFri Aug 18, 2017 9:14 pm

Donald Binks wrote:What amazes me is that old farts - even older than I am, such as Sir Paul McCartney and Sir "Mick" Jagger are still considered "cool" (is that the right word?) by the young.


I don't know about Mick, but we saw Paul on his latest tour and WOW...3 hours and no intermission of non-stop power. I think the reason he's loved by all ages is because The Beatle still has it!

Another aspect I thought I'd point out, that I've noticed in a lot of other kids my age, is that they simply don't think films can be an experience. They simply haven't grown up with films that ask for their full attention. On top of that the very design of a multiplex promotes a duller atmosphere to begin with (thus their more than likely to Netflix at home). When I go see newer movies with my friends, it's a 'get your popcorn and goof off' sort of thing. I took a friend of mine to see some silent comedies at a 1920s theater, and after seeing the theater organ, the great films, and the cool design of the theater itself he said, "I didn't know movies could be like that."
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