KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostThu Mar 29, 2018 4:18 pm

bigshot wrote:
boblipton wrote:I’ve seen it in a comfortable, filled theater with an appreciative audience on its triumphant re-premiere. How could watching it alone be better?


Don't you have any friends you could invite over?


A fun thing. But not the same thing.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostThu Mar 29, 2018 6:35 pm

This is a great party movie I bet!
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostFri Mar 30, 2018 10:52 am

BixB wrote:
Scott Eckhardt wrote:
boblipton wrote:When I reviewed the restoration at New York's Museum of Modern Art a couple of years ago, I noted that the "Rhapsody in Blue" number sounded undermiked by modern standards. How does it sound on home stereo equipment?

Bob

When I saw KING OF JAZZ at The Heights Theater in suburban Minneapolis, the volume did seem a tad low to me, but at home, playing through my soundbar, it sounded great. Good, robust volume, and, for the first time, in the section of "Happy Feet" where the dancer was doubling for Paul Whiteman, I could hear as well as see the cymbals being played. I've played the film 3 times now, and finding lots of new video and audio details each time.


I saw the film in a theatre twice and in both cases the volume seemed low to me. As Scott mentioned, I was able to crank it up here at home and it sounded so much better.


That's a error of the theater. They could have turned up the sound.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostFri Mar 30, 2018 8:09 pm

I remember back around 1974, I was watching Herbert Graff's silent comedy show on public TV, and Graff or his guest were talking about a print of THE KING OF JAZZ discovered in the film collection of a Fascist official in Italy, and it was in his collection because he was a fan of Bing Crosby! Did anyone else hear of this? I wonder if that became one of the elements used to restore the film?
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostFri Mar 30, 2018 8:14 pm

antoniod wrote:I remember back around 1974, I was watching Herbert Graff's silent comedy show on public TV, and Graff or his guest were talking about a print of THE KING OF JAZZ discovered in the film collection of a Fascist official in Italy, and it was in his collection because he was a fan of Bing Crosby! Did anyone else hear of this? I wonder if that became one of the elements used to restore the film?


Sounds like "the Mussolini copy". It's mentioned in the "Long Awaited King of Jazz Restoration Begins in 2012" thread in Talking about Talkies.

Bob
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostSat Mar 31, 2018 11:53 am

boblipton wrote:
antoniod wrote:I remember back around 1974, I was watching Herbert Graff's silent comedy show on public TV, and Graff or his guest were talking about a print of THE KING OF JAZZ discovered in the film collection of a Fascist official in Italy, and it was in his collection because he was a fan of Bing Crosby! Did anyone else hear of this? I wonder if that became one of the elements used to restore the film?


Sounds like "the Mussolini copy". It's mentioned in the "Long Awaited King of Jazz Restoration Begins in 2012" thread in Talking about Talkies.

Bob


All this and so much more is covered in detail in Layton and Pierce's book, King Of Jazz: Paul Whiteman's Technicolor Revue. Anyone interested in this film or in film history owes it to themselves to invest in a copy. The perfect companion to the DVD. http://kingofjazzbook.com/
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostSat Mar 31, 2018 1:36 pm

Was the Mussolini copy used to make this blu-ray?
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostSat Mar 31, 2018 3:19 pm

Bigshot - No. 98% of the film restoration came from the 1930 35mm negative. The Layton &. Pirerce book goes into much detail about the restoration. www.kingofjazzbook.com
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostSat Mar 31, 2018 4:34 pm

Too bad. It would be interesting to point at a specific shot in the film and say, "We have Benito Mussolini to thank for that clip."
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostSat Mar 31, 2018 9:33 pm

bigshot wrote:Too bad. It would be interesting to point at a specific shot in the film and say, "We have Benito Mussolini to thank for that clip."


Oom pah pah.

Bob
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 10:29 am

I am absolutely loving this Criterion release. For the past 2 weeks I have been so fully and completely absorbed, transported and sucked into this crazy, surreal, wacky-2-strip world -- that I don't want to leave it! I also had to pick up the book, of course, which is just awesome -- amazing detail.

I have heard about this film (but never before seen it) for a long time. Being a huge Crosby fan I certainly have known about it, but just never had the chance to see it -- despite wanting to ever since I heard about it. I'm also a huge fan of early jazz and dance hall music (including Whiteman) -- so this movie really couldn't be any more up my alley. So what a treat it has been -- and that's a big understatement -- to have this amazing Criterion release, gorgeous restoration, and a big-fat coffee table book to go along with it. When it rains it pours.

I've also been playing a lot of the Whiteman stuff I have and my appreciation for his band, I have to say, has just skyrocketed. It's cool how things like this can make one completely unhear everything you've heard before and hear it again for the first time. I mean, that's really the best thing we could ever hope for in this hobby -- right? To have a chance to reconnect with this stuff in a new deeper way? So cool.

One thing that occurred to me as I learned about this production (I can't believe it took them so long to get rolling!) was how great it would have been if they hit the ground running. I think Whiteman and Universal got together on the deal back in October of 1928!!? Geez!! How amazing would it have been if the project had started with Bix still in the band!? I think it would have been really cool to have had a release date in the 20s, too. 1928 or certainly by 1929. It's basically a "twenties" picture, I guess. But 1928 or 9 seems really cool to me, especially if we had Bix Beiderbecke in there--there's not any film footage of him.

Anyway, my head's swimming. The film is fantastic, the music is gorgeous. It's gonna be hard to top this one!
Last edited by Red Bartlett on Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:32 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 10:32 am

Red Bartlett wrote:I am absolutely loving this Criterion release. For the past 2 weeks I have been so fully and completely absorbed, transported and sucked into this crazy, surreal, wacky-2-strip world -- that I don't want to leave it! I also had to pick up the book, of course, which is just awesome -- amazing detail.

I have heard about this film (but never before seen it) for a long time. Being a huge Crosby fan I certainly have known about it, but just never had the chance to see it -- despite wanting to ever since I heard about it. I'm also a huge fan of early jazz and dance hall music (including Whiteman) -- so this movie really couldn't be any more up my alley. So what a treat it has been -- and that's a big understatement -- to have this amazing Criterion release, gorgeous restoration, and a big-fat coffee table book to go along with it. When it rains it pours.

I've also been playing a lot of the Whiteman stuff I have and my appreciation for his band, I have to say, has just skyrocketed. It's cool how things like this can make one completely unhear everything you've heard before and hear it again for the first time. I mean, that's really the best thing we could ever hope for in this hobby -- right? To have a chance to reconnect with this stuff in a new deeper way? So cool.

One thing that occurred to me as I learned about this production (I can't believe it took them so long to get rolling!) was how great it would have been if they hit the ground running. I think Whiteman and Universal got together on the deal back in October of 1928!!? Geez!! How amazing would it have been if the project had started with Bix still in the band!? I think it would have been really cool to have had a release date in the 20s. 1928 or certainly by 1929. It's basically a "twenties" picture, I guess. But 1928 or 9 seems really cool to me, especially if we had Bix Beiderbecke in there--there's not any film footage of him.

Anyway, my head's swimming. The film is fantastic, the music is gorgeous. It's gonna be hard to top this one!


It would have been nice if Bix and Tram had been in it, but they had Venturi & Lang!

Bob
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 10:48 am

boblipton wrote:It would have been nice if Bix and Tram had been in it, but they had Venturi & Lang!

Bob

Yes! I was thinking that exact same thing last night while watching it again (for the 6th or 7th time!). The "Meet the Boys" part in the beginning -- obviously -- could go on for hours, as far as I'm concerned. There was something so special and quite surreal about the parts with the Paul and the band. You know they're not actors. And to see them all so alive after only knowing them as ghostly, sound recordings and a few still photos. Really blew my mind! Bix, I guess will be forever frozen, like Han Solo in carbonite I suppose! Lol.

But so great to see Tram, Venuti and Lang -- all of them really. Bing! Even though we have all seen Bing in films before -- to see him at the beginning, as an almost nameless "rhythm boy" -- and in that trippy, 2-strip Technicolor -- was fascinating to say the least. Can't say enough about Paul Whiteman either -- the star of the show. He was an authentic, naturally funny guy! While one of the film's strengths is probably all that variety and snappy pace... for me, I couldn't get enough of Whiteman and the Boys.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 11:15 am

Red Bartlett wrote:I am absolutely loving this Criterion release. For the past 2 weeks I have been so fully and completely absorbed, transported and sucked into this crazy, surreal, wacky-2-strip world -- that I don't want to leave it! I also had to pick up the book, of course, which is just awesome -- amazing detail.

I have heard about this film (but never before seen it) for a long time. Being a huge Crosby fan I certainly have known about it, but just never had the chance to see it -- despite wanting to ever since I heard about it. I'm also a huge fan of early jazz and dance hall music (including Whiteman) -- so this movie really couldn't be any more up my alley. So what a treat it has been -- and that's a big understatement -- to have this amazing Criterion release, gorgeous restoration, and a big-fat coffee table book to go along with it. When it rains it pours.

I've also been playing a lot of the Whiteman stuff I have and my appreciation for his band, I have to say, has just skyrocketed. It's cool how things like this can make one completely unhear everything you've heard before and hear it again for the first time. I mean, that's really the best thing we could ever hope for in this hobby -- right? To have a chance to reconnect with this stuff in a new deeper way? So cool.

One thing that occurred to me as I learned about this production (I can't believe it took them so long to get rolling!) was how great it would have been if they hit the ground running. I think Whiteman and Universal got together on the deal back in October of 1928!!? Geez!! How amazing would it have been if the project had started with Bix still in the band!? I think it would have been really cool to have had a release date in the 20s, too. 1928 or certainly by 1929. It's basically a "twenties" picture, I guess. But 1928 or 9 seems really cool to me, especially if we had Bix Beiderbecke in there--there's not any film footage of him.

Anyway, my head's swimming. The film is fantastic, the music is gorgeous. It's gonna be hard to top this one!


Red, your reaction to this mirrors mine perfectly. I wanted to point out one thing. The IS film footage of Bix but not much. There's snippets of some 16mm home movie footage shot at the time he was with Goldkette. Silent, of course. But there's the 1928 Fox Movietone of Whiteman tearing up his Victor contract and signing with Columbia. The band plays My Ohio Home and at one point, on the far left, Bix stands up to play.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 11:27 am

BixB wrote:
Red Bartlett wrote:Red, your reaction to this mirrors mine perfectly. I wanted to point out one thing. The IS film footage of Bix but not much. There's snippets of some 16mm home movie footage shot at the time he was with Goldkette. Silent, of course. But there's the 1928 Fox Movietone of Whiteman tearing up his Victor contract and signing with Columbia. The band plays My Ohio Home and at one point, on the far left, Bix stands up to play.

Yeah, I remember seeing the Whiteman/Contract snippet a few years ago. Unfortunately, it's just a split second of Bix. I didn't know about the Goldkette clip though. I'll have to seek that out!
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 2:01 pm

BixB wrote:There IS film footage of Bix but not much. There's snippets of some 16mm home movie footage shot at the time he was with Goldkette. Silent, of course. But there's the 1928 Fox Movietone of Whiteman tearing up his Victor contract and signing with Columbia. The band plays My Ohio Home and at one point, on the far left, Bix stands up to play.

Thought I'd seen this footage of Bix in a documentary, but watching it again, it doesn't look familiar. This YouTube version has the footage twice, the second time it's zoomed in a bit so you can see Bix a little better.



And here's the Goldkette home movie footage, albeit in lousy quality.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostMon Apr 30, 2018 2:24 pm

Sherwin Dunner of our Vitaphone Project found this in the Fox Movietone collection c. 1982. Upon the second pass to transfer it to digital, the film shattered.
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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostFri May 18, 2018 12:52 pm

I recently checked out from my local library John Murray Anderson's posthumously published autobiography Out Without My Rubbers. For anyone who's interested, here are the sections dealing with King of Jazz. It begins with Murray nursing a hangover in his New York apartment...

***
At that moment, the phone rang in the other room, and Feltham [the butler] returned to tell me that a Mr. Metzger, of Universal Pictures, wished to speak with me.

“Tell him I'm out and to call again,” I snapped back...

During the day Mr. Metzger did call again and, partially recovered, I spoke to him. It was a strange story that he had to tell.
Carl Laemmle, Jr. was about to produce a picture starring Paul Whiteman, entitled The King of Jazz. Whiteman had traveled to Hollywood in a special train, called The Gold Train, painted entirely in gold, and sponsored by Old Gold Cigarettes. He and his band had been in Hollywood for several months on full salary, but no suitable story had been forthcoming, chiefly because no convincing romance could be invented about as fat a hero as the popular Paul. It had almost been decided that the deal had better be forgotten, and Paul and his band sent back East, when somebody got a bright idea—why bother with a story, why not make it a super-colossal revue?

No sooner was the suggestion made than Universal tried to enlist the expert services of Florenz Ziegfeld, but he was not available. Then Whiteman himself suggested me, with whom he had worked so successfully on the Publix circuit.
“So,” enquired Mr. Metzger, after explaining all this, “will you take the job?”

My first reaction was that the whole plan was ridiculous, and I told Metzger (in vino veritas) that I knew nothing about motion pictures, nor, for that matter, had I ever used a camera in my life, not even a “Brownie.”

Metzger said that I would be given the advice and assistance of the best technical experts in the business.
My brother and Feltham...kept prompting me to accept the offer, which might prove to be a lifesaver. Finally I asked what the remuneration would be, and the reply was “a straight fee of $20,000.” To the horror of my brother and Feltham, I said I would not even consider it, that I would require a minimum of $50,000, provided all other terms of the agreement were satisfactory. Mr. Metzger politely said that he was pretty sure Mr. Laemmle would not agree to this figure, especially because of my admitted lack of experience—“even with a Brownie camera,” he added. He said, however, he would report to Hollywood and let me know.

Feltham and my brother were beside themselves...After much discussion back and forth, Universal eventually agreed to my figure. In the next two years I was to get from them nearly four times the fifty thousand, and to experience one of the most pleasant associations of my life...

When I arrived in sunny California it was raining cats and dogs. Feltham and I went to the Ambassador Hotel and I called Carl Laemmle, Jr., who told me to rest up over the week-end and come out to the studio on Monday. A royal welcome awaited me there. My suite of offices was filled with flowers, and a special luncheon was tendered me on the first day. On our initial meeting Junior Laemmle seemed to be more interested in my English shoes and clothes than in the fate of The King of Jazz. This apparent casualness, however, was partly a veneer, for there were few more alive or astute executives in Hollywood than the young head of Universal Pictures. Junior showed me around and it seemed they had anticipated my arrival by building one of the largest cabaret sets ever dreamed of. This was merely the beginning of future wonders. I asked for several weeks to become familiar with working conditions, but in the meantime preparations were going forward in all departments...

I was followed to Universal by my designer, Herman Rosse, by Wynn, the cartoonist, and Harry Ruskin, a young comedy writer. Later Russell Markert, dance director, joined the company, with a group of Roxyettes.

Junior brought Paul Feyos to work with me. This inventor had l introduced many new types of lenses into the industry and had recently built the first “boom” ever to be used in Hollywood and which I inherited for use in The King of Jazz.

I was really at a loss to know where to begin, when I hit upon the idea (not very original perhaps) of interviewing all the best technical experts on the lot. And so I met and made friends of the best cameraman, Hal Mohr, and the leading trick cameraman in the business, Jerry Ash—and many others. I asked each if he had any pet ideas and effects that he had dreamed up, but had never been given the opportunity of carrying out. Jerry Ash said that nothing was impossible for the magic of the camera and suggested as a starter that in the picture we could have Paul Whiteman make his entrance carrying a small suitcase, out of which would emerge, one by one, his entire orchestra. And so it was in the picture; the tiny figures came out of the suitcase Whiteman carried and took their places on a seemingly miniature bandstand, which grew to huge proportions, with the men assuming their normal size in full view of the audience. Hal Mohr too, suggested many ideas which were incorporated in the picture. The public does not always realize perhaps that it is the technical men, and particularly the cameramen, who have been largely responsible for advancing motion pictures into one of the major arts.

I met, and immediately chose as my major collaborator, Bob Ross. He quickly replaced Dr. Paul Feyos, whose ideas did not completely coincide with mine. It was decided that the picture should be done in Technicolor, and The King of Jazz was indeed, the first all-technicolor feature musical picture. Dr. and Mrs. Kalmus, the powers behind Technicolor, had gone to Europe and the assignment was given to Ray Rennahan, the greatest color-cameraman of his day, who has since become one of the top executives in Technicolor. At that time Technicolor was only able to print in red and green. The third color was developed several years later and the first important tri-color picture was designed and directed by Robert Edmond Jones. But I was perhaps fated to become one of the pioneers in color, and, thanks to the cooperation of Ray Rennahan, many experiments hitherto unthought of were successfully brought about. Together we made the first motion picture cartoon in color, designed by my friend, Wynn. It was a prologue to the picture and was playfully called “How Paul Whiteman Was Crowned King of Jazz.” This was before the great Disney era, which began with his wonderful and imaginative Silly Symphonies.

I also was the first to use lamps with colored projection. Hitherto only white light had been used. In the picture I had Jacques Cartier dance upon a drum. His nude body was covered with black lacquer. The plain background was entirely white. I spotted the dancer from the front with a powerful white light which threw a huge black shadow on the white background. I suggested that from the right side a red gelatin be used to cast a big red shadow of the dancer on the white screen, and similarly I used a green gelatin from a lamp on the left to throw a green shadow. The result was so new and fantastic at the time that the sequence never failed to get applause whenever the picture was shown. Color projection is the order of the day now, but it is doubtful if it has ever been more simply used than in The King of Jazz.

Universal had purchased for (it was said) thirty thousand dollars the rights to use Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue in the picture. I had several conferences with George Gershwin before leaving New York, to discover if he had any preconceived ideas as to how it should be photographed. George told me he had none, and without a single suggestion, but with a blessing from the composer, I was left on my own.

Together with Herman Rosse, we evolved an elaborate synopsis illustrating the possible emotional reactions of a cross section of average and intellectual listeners to the Rhapsody. The breakdown of scenes in this fanfaronade showed an estimated cost of well over half a million dollars, to carry out the scheme. This, of course, was far too much, and another simpler plan was used.

Then came the problem of how to photograph The Rhapsody in Blue when there was no blue in Technicolor at that time. Rosse and I made tests of various fabrics and pigments, and by using an all gray and silver background finally arrived at a shade of green which gave the illusion of peacock blue.

It took twelve weeks to photograph The King of Jazz and it was entrusted entirely to me. A procedure unique in motion picture technique was followed. The continuity was written, not before, but after the shooting of each sequence.
I had a trio of singers in the picture who worked with Whiteman’s band. They were known as “The Rhythm Boys.” The most promising of them seemed to be a pianist-composer, Harry Barris. He played for the other two. One number which they sang boasted the title “Mississippi Mud.” After seeing the daily “rushes,” I suggested that one of the trio be given the singing lead in the picture; but nobody agreed with me. The fellow’s name was Bing Crosby. It was amusing to note that when the picture was reissued some twenty years later Crosby’s name was featured in larger letters than Paul Whiteman'’, although Crosby’s only contribution was “Mississippi Mud” [sic] and with a trio at that!

Having completed my directorial job, I was now faced with the problem of putting the picture together, for nobody but myself knew precisely what it was all about. And thus it happened that I had also to work with the cutters. Here again I started something new. I taught the cutters to work with a metronome, and only changed “angles” at the beginning of a musical phrase. In this way, although an audience was not perhaps conscious of it, the film actually kept cadence with the music. I have seen recent musical pictures in which very little attention is paid to “phrasing” in the cutting from one angle to another.

Paul Whiteman was a joy to work with. All of his men adored him. At Christmas he gave each of them a Ford car and me a $3,000 gold cigarette case, with a caricature of himself in diamonds on it. Paul was responsible for the introduction of the method of making sound tracks independently of the actual photographing of scene or song. It was in The King of Jazz that “ghosting” was used for the first time. The success of this highly technical picture was all the more remarkable because the first sound picture had actually been introduced to the public only two years before.

Only one other picture was being made at Universal Studios during the production period of The King of Jazz. That was All Quiet on the Western Front, one of the better pictures and directed by Lewis Milestone. Many young actors were tested for the leading part and finally a somewhat sensitive newcomer was chosen, Lewis Ayres. Junior Laemmle decided that his name was no good for pictures and must be changed. Young Ayres was adamant and said he had told his mother that he would make that name famous. Junior was equally adamant and said he would not tolerate such insubordination. I was brought in on the argument, and decided to talk to Ayres about it, pointing out that here was the opportunity of a lifetime, that this was the plum movie role of the year. To no avail; Lewis Ayres would prefer to give up the part rather than his name. I asked Junior why he thought the name bad. He didn’t like the sound of it, implied Junior. Then it suddenly occurred to me that Lewis was a well-honored name in pictures. Was there not a Lewis Stone and a Lewis Milestone? And on top of that wasn't there the well-known star, Agnes Ayres? What better combination than Lewis and Ayres? I pointed out these awe-inspiring truths to Junior. That clinched it. Junior agreed. And thus it was that Lew Ayres made a name for himself—his own.

As a result of The King of Jazz, which won an Oscar, I was given a contract for an additional year at $3,000 per week, with three months’ vacation and the right to select my own scripts. I could direct any picture without supervision (except as regards expenditure), and could refuse to do any picture of which I did not approve. Such contracts are rare, even to this day. My hope, of course, was that I might be able to do a picture that was really outstanding and worthwhile.
I went to New York for the opening of The King of Jazz at the Roxy Theatre. A good idea of its reception may be gleaned from Mordaunt Hall’s review in the New York Times...

I then went to London for the opening where I met John Drinkwater, who had been commissioned by Carl Laemmle, Sr. to write his life's story. Drinkwater, fresh from the triumphs of his play Abraham Lincoln, was criticized by his English friends for turning from a work of art to such a commercial undertaking—probably for a large fee. Drinkwater told me that the fee was secondary, that he had always wanted to write the story of an emigre to America and here was the perfect opportunity, since it combined the history of one of the world’s greatest new industries with that of a young emigrant who had risen to the top by his own ability. Drinkwater's biography should and it probably will, some day make a superb picture.

Mr. Carl Laemmle, Sr. was one of the most beloved men in Hollywood, and his son, Junior, born not with a silver but a golden spoon, was equally beloved by all who came in contact with him.

I suggested many pictures during the period of my contract. I wanted to make Rudyard Kipling’s Kim, Berkeley Square (I saw the play with Junior in New York) and I suggested a picture, half cartoon, half with live characters, of Alice in Wonderland. But the Laemmles never saw eye to eye with me in any of these. All of them have since been made into successful pictures.

I also suggested another project. I had been impressed with the many and fabulous eccentricities of Hollywood, and was in favor of doing a rip-roaring satire on Hollywood itself. Junior thought well of it, and so, in collaboration with William Hurlbut and Billy K. Wells, we turned out what we thought was an exceptionally funny script, poking fun at all the foibles of the movie capital. When it was finally submitted to the elder Laemmle (“Uncle Carl” himself), he said he would never make a picture which held up to ridicule an industry of which he was very proud. Crestfallen, my collaborators and I gave up in despair. A year later Sid Grauman presented the Kaufman-Hart satire on Hollywood, Once in a Lifetime, in Los Angeles. It had been enormously successful as a stage play everywhere, so Uncle Carl, nothing daunted, outbid all others for the picture rights and paid something like three hundred thousand dollars for the privilege. It was made at Universal.

Junior stuck pretty closely to his multifarious tasks, which he carried out very effectively, but at times he was somewhat of a hypochondriac. When I met him in London for the opening of The King of Jazz, he asked me to suggest a good English tailor. I sent him to the fashionable firm of Kilgour and French, where he ordered twenty-two suits. But Junior would never go to be fitted. Instead, a fitter came to his suite at Dorchester House for several hours each day. There was always a nurse present and the house doctor standing by. The room was hermetically sealed to keep out the cold, damp, foggy air of London. After each suit was fitted, Junior would have his temperature taken. He survived the ordeal, but back in Hollywood, months later, he gave all the new suits away because he thought them too extreme.

...I felt very much at home in Hollywood. I took an apartment at the newly built and fashionable Colonial House. My rooms overlooked the patio of my old friend Howard Greer, on the floor below. We gave rival parties and I was even known to pour champagne from my darkened balcony upon Greer and Greta Garbo as they danced serenely by beneath me...

But there were other and possibly more inspirational parties, such as the one given for me by Mr. Welford Beaton, editor of a Hollywood magazine. Ernst Lubitsch, Sergei Eisenstein and other giants of the Motion Picture world were there. At this party I said little and learned much; in fact, enough to realize that here were Masters who had served a long apprenticeship in an Art, in which I myself had mastered so little.

And so it was that, after making only one picture, The King of Jazz, I decided to leave Hollywood and return to my first love—the Theatre. The picture cost several millions and probably made several in profit. It pleased many, while some thought it far in advance of its time—too highbrow. But you can’t satisfy everybody. My uncle Arthur viewed The King of Jazz in London. He liked the beauty of the colorful backgrounds and the music, but of the comedy he said, “Damn it, I heard those same old jokes fifty years ago.”
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JumpingFrog

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Re: KING OF JAZZ on DVD or BluRay

PostTue May 22, 2018 1:42 am

Criterion blu-ray of King Of Jazz gets UK release date (9th July 2018) according to Amazon anyway.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07D4RP5T1/?coliid=I2Y3UVPF46BUH8&colid=HZ3WCETUQ31V&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it"%20target="_blank

I've got hap, hap, happy feet (and hap, hap, happy everything else as well.) :D
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