Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

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Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostFri Sep 22, 2017 7:39 am



NitrateVille Radio Episode 12: Saving Colleen Moore, with Joe Yranski and Eric Grayson

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Colleen Moore was one of the best-loved stars of the silent era, and had a long and happy life, doing much for charity with the tour of the lavish dollhouse that studio artisans built for her. In this episode I talk with two people involved in saving her cinematic legacy.

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Joe Yranski

(1:51) New York Public Library senior film librarian Joe Yranski knew Colleen Moore for the last 18 years of her life, and came to Chicago for a showing of 1927's Her Wild Oat, which he helped rescue the only print of—in the Czech Republic. In the first part he talks about the film, her stardom—and what she was like in real life.

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Colleen in Her Wild Oat's lunch wagon.

(20:25) In the second part, Joe talks about rescuing Her Wild Oat and other Colleen Moore films—an epic journey that spans the globe and decades.

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This lobby card includes a still from a now-lost sequence that Joe talks about.

(40:21) In the third part, Joe talks about Colleen's later life.

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(48:39) Film restorer Eric Grayson recently completed a restoration, funded in part by a Kickstarter, of Colleen Moore's earliest starring role, 1918's Little Orphant Annie, based not on a comic strip but on a James Whitcomb Riley poem. He talks about putting the film back together and other things he's working on, including a couple of real-life basketball games that Hollywood made famous in the 1980s.

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To order a copy of Little Orphant Annie, email Eric Grayson at filmeric at earthlink dot net.

Her Wild Oat is not available on home video, but go here for another of her late 1920s comedies, Why Be Good?

Many editions of Ella Cinders are out there, but the one from Reelclassicdvd looks to have superior image quality—not to mention a score by Ben Model. Go to this page and scroll till you find it.

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“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostFri Sep 22, 2017 8:00 am

Joe is one of the great characters of New York film fandom. Far too many of us seem to be cranks, telling you stuff so you'll admire us. Some, like Joe, Steve, Ben, Bruce (and others I am shamefully forgetting), are about sharing these wonderful things with you.

Bob
The matter is complicated, and I shall proceed to complicate it still more.

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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostFri Sep 22, 2017 11:47 am

I can't wait to listen to this one. I've already shared it on the Colleen Moore Facebook page.
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostSat Sep 23, 2017 5:47 pm

:o An excellent and highly informative interview. Two interviews. Although I was hoping to hear a little more from Eric then we did. I'm overjoyed that ORCHIDS AND ERMINE is apparently being fully restored, and that Warner's is even involved in the project. There was talk of a possible restoration shortly after Micky Rooney had passed away, but it didn't look like this were going to happen. Now it seems it's actually is in the works.

Oh, for the lost two reels of ELLA CINDERS, the dream sequence sounds enchanting. I was definitely disappointed that there was no mention of LILAC TIME or IRENE at all. I was under the impression that TWINKLETOES was recently restored in 35 Millimeter by the BFI. It's possible that NAUGHTY BUT NICE which survives in it's entirety in the Barcelona Archive is one of the two films they are trying to get repatriated. Sure hope so. The other might be OH KAY! which may or may not be complete at EYE Netherlands? Or if not, perhaps EGG CRATE WALLOP (1919) a Charles Ray feature which survives at Gosfilmofond archive in Russia.

Incidentally, it was inferred that Joe may have actually have seen THE WALLFLOWER, which I was not even aware had survived? If so, that is Moore good news. And by golly, how can we help to get SYNTHETIC SIN and HER WILD OAT both scored for TCM/Warner Archive? Same with LILAC TIME which remains frustratingly unavailable.

By the way, didn't anyone see the screening of WHEN DAWN CAME at Cinecon a couple weeks back? What sort of a shape was the print in, and what were your impressions of the picture?
Last edited by Gagman 66 on Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:14 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostMon Sep 25, 2017 11:36 pm

Listening to this right now. Loving it so far. One correction though: Louise Brooks didn't steal her haircut from Colleen Moore. As has been discussed previously on these boards, there's photographic evidence of Brooks sporting her bob as a younger girl, before Colleen adopted it. Colleen definitely popularized the style, but Louise didn't steal it.

http://www.nitrateville.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=5678&hilit=brooks+Moore+bob
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 7:16 pm

The "who stole it from whom" issue has been around forever. A few facts: the bobbed haircut has been around in America since industrialization. If you work in a factory or a farm where there are moving parts that might catch your hair, you bob that hair. Better short hair then having a chunk of scalp yanked off. Louise came from a rural background, she wore her hair in a bob. Maybe it's what the girls around her were wearing, maybe she just preferred it. Colleen came from an upper middle-class urban background: her hair was long and either in braids (school uniform) or in curls (fashionable).
Bobbed hair, in the teens, was frowned upon: you only had bobbed hair if you were poor, or if you were a trouble-maker. "Flapper" was not a term of endearment.... it was like being referred to as one of "those" girls. However, women moved into the workplace during the war years, thus short hair and bobbed hair became popular, at least among the women who saw it as a necessity. It was also making appearances in fashion magazines and on movie stars. It was popular enough that in the early 1920s Colleen was flirting with a bob, wearing her hair in a faux-bob (short on the sides, rolled up in back.
Colleen's part as Patricia Frentiss called for a modern haircut, and the bob was what was decided on. It was an edgy book and an edgy character on the pages, but the sharp edges sufficiently blunted on screen that Colleen made the "flapper" an acceptable social type... a girl who has a few wild years but eventually settles down into marriage. That popularity carried over to the haircut. At that point, Louise had a bob, but not the short bob every one associates with her... see her high school sophomore photo in Wikipedia. In that photo, it might be about the same length of Colleen's in Flaming Youth. It would be a year or two more before she got it cut short (when she went to New York, if memory serves).
So Louise had a bob first, Colleen made the bob popular, Louise went even shorter after Colleen debuted her cut. Remember, this was the era of the Eaton cut, so short hair was suddenly fashionable. And then to make things even more confused, Colleen's bob went even shorter than it had been for Synthetic Sin and Why Be Good.
Remember, the two were not contemporaries and never in competition. Colleen was getting ready to retire from films (but was pressured by her husband to stay in the industry) at about the time Louise was just entering films. Colleen hit the pinnacle, Louise undercut her own career early on. Colleen’s hair stayed short (to varying degrees) the rest of her life, with and without bangs. Louise abandoned the bob altogether from time to time. For Louise, fashion and image were everything, while Colleen—in spite of her fashionable veneer—could care less and kept the bob because it was the easiest haircut to maintain.
Not that this missive will settle things, but I had a few spare minutes and figured I’d chime in and stoke the fires of the debate a little. I'm a dyed-in-the-wool bomb thrower.
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 7:38 pm

Lest we forget: Mary Thurman was wearing her hair in a "Dutch" bob by the summer of 1921 (see Photoplay for July 1921, pages 11, 34-35, 93).

-HA
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 2:07 am

vicvalis wrote:The "who stole it from whom" issue has been around forever. A few facts: the bobbed haircut has been around in America since industrialization. If you work in a factory or a farm where there are moving parts that might catch your hair, you bob that hair. Better short hair then having a chunk of scalp yanked off. Louise came from a rural background, she wore her hair in a bob. Maybe it's what the girls around her were wearing, maybe she just preferred it. Colleen came from an upper middle-class urban background: her hair was long and either in braids (school uniform) or in curls (fashionable).
Bobbed hair, in the teens, was frowned upon: you only had bobbed hair if you were poor, or if you were a trouble-maker. "Flapper" was not a term of endearment.... it was like being referred to as one of "those" girls. However, women moved into the workplace during the war years, thus short hair and bobbed hair became popular, at least among the women who saw it as a necessity. It was also making appearances in fashion magazines and on movie stars. It was popular enough that in the early 1920s Colleen was flirting with a bob, wearing her hair in a faux-bob (short on the sides, rolled up in back.
Colleen's part as Patricia Frentiss called for a modern haircut, and the bob was what was decided on. It was an edgy book and an edgy character on the pages, but the sharp edges sufficiently blunted on screen that Colleen made the "flapper" an acceptable social type... a girl who has a few wild years but eventually settles down into marriage. That popularity carried over to the haircut. At that point, Louise had a bob, but not the short bob every one associates with her... see her high school sophomore photo in Wikipedia. In that photo, it might be about the same length of Colleen's in Flaming Youth. It would be a year or two more before she got it cut short (when she went to New York, if memory serves).
So Louise had a bob first, Colleen made the bob popular, Louise went even shorter after Colleen debuted her cut. Remember, this was the era of the Eaton cut, so short hair was suddenly fashionable. And then to make things even more confused, Colleen's bob went even shorter than it had been for Synthetic Sin and Why Be Good.
Remember, the two were not contemporaries and never in competition. Colleen was getting ready to retire from films (but was pressured by her husband to stay in the industry) at about the time Louise was just entering films. Colleen hit the pinnacle, Louise undercut her own career early on. Colleen’s hair stayed short (to varying degrees) the rest of her life, with and without bangs. Louise abandoned the bob altogether from time to time. For Louise, fashion and image were everything, while Colleen—in spite of her fashionable veneer—could care less and kept the bob because it was the easiest haircut to maintain.
Not that this missive will settle things, but I had a few spare minutes and figured I’d chime in and stoke the fires of the debate a little. I'm a dyed-in-the-wool bomb thrower.


None of which backs up Mike's assertion that Brooks stole her hairstyle from Moore. Which was my point. She didn't. Nor did Moore steal it from Brooks. The whole thing is silly.
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 7:04 am

Here's someone who's been wearing it since the 9th century:

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“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 11:06 am

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It's not who wore it first. It's who wore it best!
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Re: Ep. 12: Saving Colleen Moore: Joe Yranski • Eric Grayson

PostTue Nov 21, 2017 7:03 pm

FYI:

Little Orphant Annie is now available (at last) on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076ZFSNMM

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