1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

Open, general discussion of silent films, personalities and history.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

silentfilm

Moderator

  • Posts: 9115
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
  • Location: Dallas, TX USA

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostThu Sep 22, 2011 10:51 am

Image
From one of Harold Lochwood's last films, released right before he died. If you read Richard Kozarski's article linked above, you'll see that Metro was nervous about releasing Lochwood's completed films after he died.
Offline
User avatar

forgottenvisions

  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 10:07 pm

The 1918-19 Spanish Flu Pandemic and American Fim Production

PostThu May 30, 2013 1:40 am

The flu epidemic of 1918 swept across America first appearing in March 1918, building momentum in the summer when it would recede for a few months, only to reappear in the early autumn having mutated into a killer. By the time the pandemic had "run its course" over half a million Americans were dead. It circled the world, killing 40-100 million people, nobody knows the exact death toll, but more recent counts have placed the casualties closer to 100 million. It infected one-third of the human beings on the planet.

Schools, churches, theaters, were closed. People who ventured out wore cotton masks for protection, most people stayed home and stayed away from other people. With war in Europe and the high and swift morality rate of the flu on the home front, people thought it was the end of the world. How did Hollywood react? Did they shut down film productions? Did any actors, directors, producers, etc. die from influenza?

I've only seen limited film clips from this period, war bond drives etc., and I've never seen anyone wearing masks, also can anybody recall any film where one of the characters dies from influenza? I've always wondered why this disaster, until recently, was never part of our collective American history. I asked a flu survivor about this once and she replied that when it was happening it was like the plague, it was so terrible that when it was over, all we wanted to do was forget.
Offline
User avatar

BankofAmericasSweetheart

  • Posts: 308
  • Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2010 1:01 am
  • Location: Los Angeles,CA

Re: The 1918-19 Spanish Flu Pandemic and American Fim Produc

PostThu May 30, 2013 3:04 am

I think in the movie Pollyanna(1919), Mary Pickford sneezes at the train station and everybody within 50 feet of her run for the hills. I never understood the real meaning, just figured it was "let's not catch a cold" jokes. Then I did some research around the era and realized that there was a very serious flu outbreak and that very scene might have been a sick joke referencing it.

I think Mary had the bug herself, during the filming of what, Stella Maris? She was sick with the flu but insisted on working despite the doctor telling her it wasn't recommended...Unless that's some odd urban legend.
"It would have been more logical if silent pictures had grown out of the talkies instead of the other way around." - MP
Offline
User avatar

bobfells

  • Posts: 2917
  • Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:03 pm
  • Location: Old Virginny

Re: The 1918-19 Spanish Flu Pandemic and American Fim Produc

PostThu May 30, 2013 6:44 am

In George Arliss' first memoir, UP THE YEARS FROM BLOOMSBURY, he recalls how he had to cancel his tour of HAMILTON due to theater closures. He referred to the pandemic as "the flu scare" suggesting that he didn't know anyone who was a victim, at least not fatally. I supposed the impact depended on who you knew who was affected. As late as 1937 there seemed to be jokes being made. Recall a scene in A DAY AT THE RACES where Groucho is discussing his "medical experience." He says, "Then there was the flu epidemic." When pressed for details he says, "I got the flu."
Offline

T0m M

  • Posts: 369
  • Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 9:51 am

Re: The 1918-19 Spanish Flu Pandemic and American Fim Produc

PostThu May 30, 2013 7:47 am

This has previously been discussed on the forum See viewtopic.php?f=3&t=10271&p=67237&hilit=spanish+flue#p67237
Offline
User avatar

silentfilm

Moderator

  • Posts: 9115
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
  • Location: Dallas, TX USA

Re: The 1918-19 Spanish Flu Pandemic and American Fim Produc

PostThu May 30, 2013 11:13 am

T0m M wrote:This has previously been discussed on the forum See viewtopic.php?f=3&t=10271&p=67237&hilit=spanish+flue#p67237" target="_blank


I've merged these two topics together.
Offline

PhilipS

  • Posts: 70
  • Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 11:12 pm
  • Location: Australia

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostFri May 31, 2013 2:03 am

Rick Lanham wrote:Take a look at this newspaper page, the story near the upper right corner
has some figures, that, if true, are amazing:

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/ ... d-1/seq-9/" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank
At the other end of the spectrum (and the page) there is an advert for a concert by Leo Ornstein, who died in 2002 aged about 108. And Ornstein was filling in for Ossip Gabrilowitsch, who it is stated was unable to perform due to his wife's serious illness (presumably the flu). His wife was Clara Clemens, daughter of Mark Twain.
Offline
User avatar

Brooksie

  • Posts: 2656
  • Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2010 6:41 pm
  • Location: Portland, Oregon via Sydney, Australia

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 12:51 am

Just came across another brief reference to the pandemic in Variety (December 1918) - a number of Rolin players, including Snub Pollard and Bebe Daniels, contracted the flu and they shut down the studio. The same edition mentions Nell Shipman as another who caught the disease and survived.
Offline

moviepas

  • Posts: 1002
  • Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:51 am

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 1:03 am

Book: The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History by John M Barry. Published in Penguin Books edition with a new Foreword on Avian Flu in 2005. 547pp with Index & Photos.
Offline
User avatar

Rollo Treadway

  • Posts: 895
  • Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 6:32 pm
  • Location: Norway

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 5:26 am

A Day at the Races (1937):

Whitmore: The doctor seems reluctant to relate his medical experiences.

Hackenbush: Well, medically my experiences have been most unexciting. Except during the flu epidemic.

Whitmore: Ah! And what happened?

Hackenbush: I got the flu.
Offline
User avatar

Dana

  • Posts: 179
  • Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:40 am

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 8:17 am

Although the Hollywood body count and money losses seem to be the primary intrigue for most people I've always wondered how the industry (and society at large) managed to virtually ignore the trauma and slaughter it caused in the films they made. Yes, I realize that dying a horrible death via flu is not as photogenic as being blown up in a trench but there are VERY few references to the pandemic in the films of the twenties. It's as though it never happened while the war is referred to in damn near every piece of celluloid pumped out after 1918.
I think this tragedy was just too unspeakable (and uncontrollable) to talk about for most people. Nearly everyone lost a friend or a relative. The war "to end all wars" was a done deal but a pandemic could come again.
Offline
User avatar

rogerskarsten

  • Posts: 490
  • Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2009 2:04 pm
  • Location: Hildesheim, Germany

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 1:57 pm

Dana wrote:Although the Hollywood body count and money losses seem to be the primary intrigue for most people I've always wondered how the industry (and society at large) managed to virtually ignore the trauma and slaughter it caused in the films they made. Yes, I realize that dying a horrible death via flu is not as photogenic as being blown up in a trench but there are VERY few references to the pandemic in the films of the twenties. It's as though it never happened while the war is referred to in damn near every piece of celluloid pumped out after 1918.
I think this tragedy was just too unspeakable (and uncontrollable) to talk about for most people. Nearly everyone lost a friend or a relative. The war "to end all wars" was a done deal but a pandemic could come again.


Dana, your comments made me think about Murnau's NOSFERATU, a film that has often been analyzed in the context of post-WWI Germany, but (to my knowledge at least) usually in terms of the trauma caused by the losses from the war itself and not from the influenza pandemic. But it does seem that the film's emphasis on the plague and on the title figure as the embodiment of pestilence and disease points to the latter as perhaps a primary reference.

~Roger
Offline
User avatar

Dana

  • Posts: 179
  • Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:40 am

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSat Jun 08, 2013 7:47 pm

Nosferatu does seem a likely candidate. Perhaps there are many other films worth rethinking.
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSun Jun 09, 2013 11:08 am

Dana wrote:... I've always wondered how the industry (and society at large) managed to virtually ignore the trauma and slaughter it caused in the films they made. Yes, I realize that dying a horrible death via flu is not as photogenic as being blown up in a trench but there are VERY few references to the pandemic in the films of the twenties....


Lack of anything interesting to photograph, other than sickrooms and graves, was no doubt a major reason for the epidemic's failure to strike a responsive chord in H'wood, but I should think another was the utter meaningless of deaths from such a mysterious disease...relative to the important meanings that could be attached to the sacrifices of the Great War: "Making the World Safe for Democracy," as Wilson insisted, or the Austrian's urge to avenge the murder of their heir-apparent, or the ambition of France to recover Alsace. Such a meaning as was commonly attached to the many more numerous deaths caused by the Black Death of the 14th C.--God's just retribution for the sinfulness of humanity--was no longer possible in the 20th C.
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7079
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostSun Jun 09, 2013 12:02 pm

American Indian actor Elijah Tahamont aka Dark Cloud (34 films between 1910 til his death in 1918. Among his films: The Birth of a Nation, Intolerance and 7 other films with Griffith.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4839
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 8:07 am

Dana wrote:Although the Hollywood body count and money losses seem to be the primary intrigue for most people I've always wondered how the industry (and society at large) managed to virtually ignore the trauma and slaughter it caused in the films they made. Yes, I realize that dying a horrible death via flu is not as photogenic as being blown up in a trench but there are VERY few references to the pandemic in the films of the twenties. It's as though it never happened while the war is referred to in damn near every piece of celluloid pumped out after 1918.
I think this tragedy was just too unspeakable (and uncontrollable) to talk about for most people. Nearly everyone lost a friend or a relative. The war "to end all wars" was a done deal but a pandemic could come again.


Just throwing an idea out for discussion's sake, but perhaps its because deaths from disease in those pre-antibiotic days were not all that unusual. Tuberculosis was also endemic and just as deadly, but I cannot recall seeing any references to it in silent film.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 9:38 am

Frederica wrote: Tuberculosis was also endemic and just as deadly, but I cannot recall seeing any references to it in silent film.


TB--more commonly known as consumption in the 19th C.--wasn't anywhere near as comparable in shock-effect to the flu epidemic. Victims declined gradually in health over a period of many years, sometimes surviving for over two decades before finally succumbing, as did the famous Dr. Edward Trudeau, who established the TB clinic I drive by on the way to my own MD in Saranac Lake, NY. Moreover, people thought (erroneously, of course) they understood the causes of TB--principally "bad air" in congested urban areas...which was why the mountain air & frigid temps of S.L. were believed to be healing influences.
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4839
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 9:43 am

entredeuxguerres wrote:
Frederica wrote: Tuberculosis was also endemic and just as deadly, but I cannot recall seeing any references to it in silent film.


TB--more commonly known as consumption in the 19th C.--wasn't anywhere near as comparable in shock-effect to the flu epidemic. Victims declined gradually in health over a period of many years, sometimes surviving for over two decades before finally succumbing, as did the famous Dr. Edward Trudeau, who established the TB clinic I drive by on the way to my own MD in Saranac Lake, NY. Moreover, people thought (erroneously, of course) they understood the causes of TB--principally "bad air" in congested urban areas...which was why the mountain air & frigid temps of S.L. were believed to be healing influences.


Yes, we know all that. What evidence are you using to establish that the flu had shock-effect?
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 11:31 am

Frederica wrote:Yes, we know all that. What evidence are you using to establish that the flu had shock-effect?


I'll bet you do. By "shock-effect" I meant the effect on public morale of thousands of almost sudden deaths from an all but unknown cause; my evidence is common sense.
Offline
User avatar

silentfilm

Moderator

  • Posts: 9115
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
  • Location: Dallas, TX USA

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 11:40 am

Lillian Gish's character dies of TB in La Bohème (1926), although I cannot recall of the disease is actually mentioned on-screen.


The Temple of Moloch (1914) is a teens short about tuberculosis.

According to this website, Edison made several other films with the cooperation of the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis.
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 12:28 pm

Get those two kids at once into one of Doc Trudeau's cure-cottages...there to lie motionless in the open, balsam-scented, air, covered up by a buffalo-robe or bear-skin; when signs of improvement are evident, they'll be allowed to read a book, perhaps even play a game of checkers. "Preventatarium," did they say?
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4839
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 12:43 pm

entredeuxguerres wrote:
Frederica wrote:Yes, we know all that. What evidence are you using to establish that the flu had shock-effect?


I'll bet you do. By "shock-effect" I meant the effect on public morale of thousands of almost sudden deaths from an all but unknown cause; my evidence is common sense.


I'd prefer something a little more solid, primary sources are good. If the reason the flu isn't reflected in film was because of public shock, you'd expect it to become a subject after a certain amount of time had passed. It doesn't. It's not just films the flu is absent from, it's also noticeably absent from contemporary literature, with the exception of Pale Horse, Pale Rider. On the other hand, other diseases are also absent (or nearly so) from both film and literature. Cancer was a huge killer with a causation even less understood than was the flu, but it is not referenced in any popular art form that I can think of right off the bat.

More work is needed on the subject, I think.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7079
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 1:01 pm

This could be interesting

http://www.scribd.com/doc/66595728/Hova ... AND-MEMORY

but I'm not paying to read it.....
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 1:52 pm

Frederica wrote: If the reason the flu isn't reflected in film was because of public shock, you'd expect it to become a subject after a certain amount of time had passed.


That's not what I said. This is what I said:

"Lack of anything interesting to photograph, other than sickrooms and graves, was no doubt a major reason for the epidemic's failure to strike a responsive chord in H'wood, but I should think another was the utter meaningless of deaths from such a mysterious disease...relative to the important meanings that could be attached to the sacrifices of the Great War: "Making the World Safe for Democracy," as Wilson insisted, or the Austrian's urge to avenge the murder of their heir-apparent, or the ambition of France to recover Alsace. Such a meaning as was commonly attached to the many more numerous deaths caused by the Black Death of the 14th C.--God's just retribution for the sinfulness of humanity--was no longer possible in the 20th C."
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4839
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 1:53 pm

drednm wrote:This could be interesting

http://www.scribd.com/doc/66595728/Hova ... AND-MEMORY" target="_blank" target="_blank

but I'm not paying to read it.....


I'll see if I can get it.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline

Daniel Eagan

  • Posts: 733
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 7:14 am

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 2:17 pm

Frederica wrote:If the reason the flu isn't reflected in film was because of public shock, you'd expect it to become a subject after a certain amount of time had passed. It doesn't. It's not just films the flu is absent from, it's also noticeably absent from contemporary literature, with the exception of Pale Horse, Pale Rider. On the other hand, other diseases are also absent (or nearly so) from both film and literature. Cancer was a huge killer with a causation even less understood than was the flu, but it is not referenced in any popular art form that I can think of right off the bat.

More work is needed on the subject, I think.


I think influenza and other diseases played a bigger part in popular culture than we're aware of today. We can see the feature films and read the big novels, but not so easily the newspapers, magazines, songs, etc., of the time.

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1925, tuberculosis killed 3.5 million in the US between 1900 and 1925. TB was a constant, daily presence. Pulp stories are filled with sickly, consumptive types, for example in Hammett's Continental Op stories, in David Goodis novels, in just about any H.P. Lovecraft piece. I can't speak authoritatively about jazz or straight pop, but country music fans knew Jimmie Rodgers had TB. He even sang a song about it, "T.B. Blues," which Dow Pharmaceuticals later used in a Rifadin ad campaign. Several other country performers like Gene Autry and Ernest Tubb sang about TB.

There are plenty of sponsored movies about TB, including government films directed by Edgar Ulmer. I see the Fresh Air Fund as a response in part to the spread of TB in slums. When it had an active film unit, the Red Cross released shorts about TB.

A Rodgers biographer, Nolan Porterfield, makes the argument that many people diagnosed with TB preferred to ignore their disease rather than live in sick rooms surrounded by medicine bottles that they knew wouldn't work. I think in the same way feature films don't address TB directly because it was like a jinx. There's Camille, of course, and Virginia Clemm, and Doc Holliday, but they are pretty, photogenic examples.

I like to think of characters with unexplained illnesses as possibly suffering from TB. Like the suicidal boarder down the hall in The Seventh Victim.

There aren't many features about polio either—Roughly Speaking with Rosalind Russell has a subplot about it—but there are plenty of magazine articles, short stories, and sponsored films about it.

Not sure if this is answering anything. It's an interesting topic. How quickly can movies respond to cultural trends?

I do love "Pale Horse Pale Rider."
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4839
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 2:52 pm

entredeuxguerres wrote:
Frederica wrote: If the reason the flu isn't reflected in film was because of public shock, you'd expect it to become a subject after a certain amount of time had passed.


That's not what I said. This is what I said:

"Lack of anything interesting to photograph, other than sickrooms and graves, was no doubt a major reason for the epidemic's failure to strike a responsive chord in H'wood, but I should think another was the utter meaningless of deaths from such a mysterious disease...relative to the important meanings that could be attached to the sacrifices of the Great War: "Making the World Safe for Democracy," as Wilson insisted, or the Austrian's urge to avenge the murder of their heir-apparent, or the ambition of France to recover Alsace. Such a meaning as was commonly attached to the many more numerous deaths caused by the Black Death of the 14th C.--God's just retribution for the sinfulness of humanity--was no longer possible in the 20th C."


I can see some problems with this. Deaths from other diseases (and the flu really wasn't all that mysterious) would be just as meaningless. Films don't deal with reality, especially not the reality of illness, so not having anything interesting to photograph would not be a problem--loooonnngggg drawn out Movie Disease death scenes, where an impeccably made-up and perfectly coiffed sufferer issues a tiny cough, speechifies for six minutes, and then expires to a crescendo of swelling violins are a staple.

Were there any classic films where the subject (or a secondary subject) was an epidemic? There are Noble Physician films, where the brave doctor battles superstition and his own exhaustion to produce the magical cure. The Rains Came and The Painted Veil have Epidemics-Ex-Machina, and Bette Davis catches diphtheria in Mr. Skeffington, but that's a Comeuppance Disease. Greta Garbo glows to death in at least one film. Right off the bat, the only films I can think of that are about epidemics are fairly modern, The Andromeda Strain and Contagion.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline
User avatar

entredeuxguerres

  • Posts: 4726
  • Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:46 pm
  • Location: Empire State

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 2:59 pm

Daniel Eagan wrote:There aren't many features about polio either—Roughly Speaking with Rosalind Russell has a subplot about it—but there are plenty of magazine articles, short stories, and sponsored films about it.


Not to mention March of Dimes fund-raising publicity. One year, an iron-lung (about the size of a I-man submarine) was set up for several weeks in the lobby of my home-town's single theater, along with MOD posters, & coffers for donations--which was what it was all about. And wasn't there an annual contest of some sort for MOD's "crippled-child" poster of the year? Because of such publicity as this, no kid growing up in the '50s was unaware of polio; I didn't worry at all about A & H-bombs (though there was unceasing chatter about these, too), but about getting polio, I was very much concerned, & distinctly recall the sense of relief (saved!) with which I received my first injection of Dr. Salk's vaccine (God bless the man).
Offline
User avatar

Danny Burk

Moderator

  • Posts: 1583
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:11 pm
  • Location: South Bend, IN

Re: 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Effects

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 3:02 pm

Frederica wrote:Were there any classic films where the subject (or a secondary subject) was an epidemic?


Yellow Fever in JEZEBEL
Offline
User avatar

JFK

  • Posts: 2009
  • Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:44 pm

Famous Flu Fatality and Films to Sneeze By

PostMon Jun 10, 2013 3:08 pm

Last edited by JFK on Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:27 pm, edited 3 times in total.
PreviousNext

Return to Talking About Silents

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests