"The Werewolf" (1913)

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Sheliakbob

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"The Werewolf" (1913)

PostWed Dec 04, 2013 10:37 pm

"The Werewolf" released by Universal in 1913 is the first werewolf film in cinema history. The one hundredth anniversary of the release of that film is coming up this December 13th.
I've been digging around for information on this lost film for a few years now, finding mostly the same couple of sentences of synopsis and the cast information but little else. Just this past October, I finally came across the Universal Weekly issue publicizing the release of the film. There was a complete synopsis of the movie along with the only photo I've ever seen of Phyllis Gordon as the wolf-witch Watuma.

To celebrate the anniversary, and for general amusement, I wrote a short novelette featuring Watuma--presented as the noveliztion of a silent film that never existed. My work, while being basically fanfic, is still the only sequel to the first werewolf film ever made. I've epublished it along with the complete synopsis of the original film on Smashwords where it is available for the low, low price of 99 cents.
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Gloria Rampage

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Re: "The Werewolf" (1913)

PostThu Dec 05, 2013 12:33 pm

Nothing like joining a forum for shameless self-promotion.
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Sheliakbob

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Re: "The Werewolf" (1913)

PostFri Dec 06, 2013 12:04 am

HEY!
I've been reading on this forum for years. Just didn't have much to offer before.
And where else am I likely to find anyone who might actually be interested in fiction based on a lost silent film a hundred years old? Kind of thought this might be a good place to at least talk about The Werewolf and other Bison/Universals that I'm interested in ("Legend of the Phantom Tribe" "The Phantom Light" "A Cave-Dweller's Romance" etc.) Ruth Ann Baldwin seems to have done a number of "Indian Legend" film scenarios. There isn't all that much in the way of supernatural subject matter at the time and the focus on "Indian Legends" as a sort of regional flavor of folk tale merits some attention, certainly! "Indian Legends" were very popular in late 19th and early 20th Century American folk culture, representing not so much an interest in indigenous story traditions, but rather a means to satisfy the Romantic desire for antiquity in a new nation. Most "Indian Legends" that crop up in Euro-American fiction (including the countless "Lovers' Leaps" scattered about the map) owe more to European folk tale traditions than to native ones.
That the first cinematic werewolf is clearly what horror fans now would recognize as a "Skinwalker" is also kind of interesting. Ruth Ann Baldwin was apparently cognizant of some authentic Native American beliefs.

And finally, there was nothing "shameless" about that self promotion! I find it awkward and uncomfortable but still hope to find SOMEone interested in the work I did, at least the research if nothing else.
I apologize if my clumsy efforts offended you. Now you know why I stuck to just reading the forums for years.
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Frederica

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Re: "The Werewolf" (1913)

PostFri Dec 06, 2013 9:47 am

Sheliakbob wrote:HEY!
I've been reading on this forum for years. Just didn't have much to offer before.
And where else am I likely to find anyone who might actually be interested in fiction based on a lost silent film a hundred years old? Kind of thought this might be a good place to at least talk about The Werewolf and other Bison/Universals that I'm interested in ("Legend of the Phantom Tribe" "The Phantom Light" "A Cave-Dweller's Romance" etc.) Ruth Ann Baldwin seems to have done a number of "Indian Legend" film scenarios. There isn't all that much in the way of supernatural subject matter at the time and the focus on "Indian Legends" as a sort of regional flavor of folk tale merits some attention, certainly! "Indian Legends" were very popular in late 19th and early 20th Century American folk culture, representing not so much an interest in indigenous story traditions, but rather a means to satisfy the Romantic desire for antiquity in a new nation. Most "Indian Legends" that crop up in Euro-American fiction (including the countless "Lovers' Leaps" scattered about the map) owe more to European folk tale traditions than to native ones.
That the first cinematic werewolf is clearly what horror fans now would recognize as a "Skinwalker" is also kind of interesting. Ruth Ann Baldwin was apparently cognizant of some authentic Native American beliefs.

And finally, there was nothing "shameless" about that self promotion! I find it awkward and uncomfortable but still hope to find SOMEone interested in the work I did, at least the research if nothing else.
I apologize if my clumsy efforts offended you. Now you know why I stuck to just reading the forums for years.


Not to worry, none of us here are averse to shameless self-promotion. Are you on Goodreads? That's an excellent place to flog your book, no shame required.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
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Sheliakbob

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Re: "The Werewolf" (1913)

PostMon Dec 09, 2013 4:01 am

The Werewolf (1913) synopsis from The Universal Weekly vol.3 no.24 Dec. 1913

“The play opens in pioneer days. “Kee-On-Ee, an Indian maiden is married to Ezra Vance, a trail blazer. When her child is five years old, Kee-On-Ee is driven back to her tribe by Ezra’s brother, who scorns all squaws. Ezra is killed by an old enemy and Kee-On-Ee, thinking his failure to return to her to be indifference, brings up her child, Watuma, to hate all white men.
When the child is grown, Clifford and a party of prospectors appear. Kee-On-Ee, now a hag, sees her way to be revenged. She sends her daughter to Clifford’s camp and he is driven nigh mad by her beauty. Clifford finds her in the arms of a young Indian. She taunts him. Enraged beyond control, Clifford shoots the buck. He flees to the mission. Watuma leads the enraged Indians against the Friars. When one of them raises a cross, Watuma slowly dissolves into a slinking wolf.
A hundred years later, Clifford, now reincarnated in the form of Jack Ford, a miner, receives a visit from his sweetheart, Margaret. Hunting with her he comes upon a wolf which he is unable to shoot. The wolf dissolves into the woman of old, and there appears before his puzzled eyes the scene where he slew the Brave. The “Wolf-woman” would caress him, but he throws her off. She returns again as the wolf and kills his sweetheart. Clifford’s punishment for the deed of past life is made complete at the death of the one he loved.”

DIRECTOR: Henry MacRae
WRITER: Ruth Ann Baldwin
CAST:
CLARENCE BURTON…Ezra Vance, Prospector and Trail Blazer
MARIE WALCAMP…Kee-On-Ee, as a young woman
PHYLLIS GORDON…Watuma, daughter of Kee-On-Ee
LULE WARRENTON…Kee-On-Ee, years later
SHERMAN BAINBRIDGE…Stone Eye
WILLIAM CLIFFORD…Jack Ford
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Einar the Lonely

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Re: "The Werewolf" (1913)

PostMon Dec 16, 2013 6:18 am

The photo please!
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

http://gimlihospital.wordpress.com/

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