What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

Open, general discussion of silent films, personalities and history.
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boblipton

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Sep 23, 2017 8:28 am

boblipton wrote:
Mike Gebert wrote:I take no responsibility for anyone who has already seen an Aronofsky film and disliked it, seeing mother! As I said, there's an Aronofsky film I have repeat-watched... and this isn't it.

But I do have a certain taste for "stretch" movies. Ones which try to blow my mind, man, take me into the infinite and the ineffable. Movies are pretend dreams and I like people trying to push that as far as it can go, sometimes, into the ecstasy-dreams that used to get you sainted like St. Theresa. 30 years ago I saw Stalker, found it interminable and ludicrous; it came to the Music Box this summer, went to it with my older son, and we loved it. Russians trying to get right in God's face to ask him questions, and possibly being poisoned by the regime in the process in real life— now that's a movie! At least the audience this time was as enraptured as we were. So yes, I do "enjoy" that.

mother!-wise, I just watched the '39 Cat and the Canary, which is about a woman who has an old house in the middle of nowhere, into which lots of strangers and a certain amount of terror come. Close enough!




That's the answer I was looking for. I like to stretch my mind occasionally. I'll see how the week goes and what my mood is.

Bob


Just one more thought in the slow-moving glacier of my mind. I'm a great believer in the idea that it isn't enough to see the Great Works to understand what is going on. You've got to see the good stuff, the mediocre stuff, the bad stuff, the ignored stuff, the disdained stuff. Not only are some great movies ignored, but you can only understand why a movie is really great in the context of its own genre. Looking at a lot of Sennett without having seen the Griffith shorts they mocked make them meaningless hash.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostMon Sep 25, 2017 7:12 am

So I finally got some time to watch my freshly opened copy of Beggars of Life. I'd never seen the film before and only knew about its reputation as Louise Brooks's best Hollywood picture. So with all the mystique and celebration of Brooks today (something she apparently found amusing as hell later in life) it kind of surprised me that the film was really more a show piece of the talent of the great Wallace Beery.

That's not to the detriment of the picture at all, of course. Beery is great to watch, whether as Professor Challenger in The Lost World or even as Keaton's rival in the Three Ages. His sound career was so fantastic that sadly we neglect his silent roles.

So, it's a great must-buy film but not so much for the woman advertised on the cover of the disc.
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Hamilton's Grandson

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 8:37 pm

Rainbow Trail (1925)

I always thought that any footage of this film was either in a private collection and was never going to be available or lost. I finally was able to find it available in DVD-R form through Finders Keepers Classics, LLC. (classicmoviesdvd.com).

The film is the sequel to Riders of the Purple Sage (1925) and Tom Mix and Tony are in top form again in this one. The reproduction is of poor quality with less clarity to the background of each frame than you would see with direct 35 mm nitrate transfer. Appears to have been from VHS or 16 mm transfer from a poorer copy than original print material. The score was a combination of piano (not live) and perhaps a sound added score from phonograph as you could her the needle static toward the end of the film. Stunts were great with initial footage of the ending of Riders to get the audience up to date with what occurred in Surprise Valley in that film before this sequel.

Action packed moments in the film were entertaining. What other film can you see Lucien Littlefield and Mark Hamilton in a couple of saloon skirmishes. Not as great as Santschi and Farnum but hey it added well to the plot.

Dana
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 10:00 pm

Battra92 wrote:So, it's a great must-buy film but not so much for the woman advertised on the cover of the disc.


Fortunately, you can reverse the cover so that Wally is on the front. :-)
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 8:32 am

Rodney wrote:
Battra92 wrote:So, it's a great must-buy film but not so much for the woman advertised on the cover of the disc.


Fortunately, you can reverse the cover so that Wally is on the front. :-)


True but Louise Brooks's picture is much nicer to look at.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 5:46 pm

The Captive(1915) Cecil B. DeMille with Blanche Sweet. Excellent print.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostMon Oct 02, 2017 8:10 am

My daughter was having a hard time going down for a nap on Saturday to the endless frustration of my wife. I took over and she and I watched Die Suffragette (1913) until she was more receptive to a nap (ahh, the joys of parenting.)

Anyway, the picture itself was interesting but sadly heavily truncated due to missing scenes. Intertitles explained what we were missing but I feel it broke up a lot of what the film's original punch was.

While the film is German, it takes place in Britain. Of course, the topic itself isn't treated with the sort of glory that is given to the suffragettes today. The film does touch on some arguments that are glossed over today by popular history (the fact that men didn't even have universal voting rights in Brittan until 1918, the lack of interest by the suffragettes in giving voting rights to the lower class women and of course the terrorist acts perpetrated by the women.

While the film does have its biases (like all films including the Oscar-bait that came out a few years ago which everyone rightfully ignored) it's quite interesting for a close-up shot of Nielsen. Now of course by 1913 Griffith was already doing them on the regular, but they are still rare in these types of films and it's quite interesting to see one from that period.

I'm really enjoying the DVD releases from Edition Filmmuseum and hopefully I'll be able to watch more from my backlog of films on my shelf.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostMon Oct 02, 2017 12:10 pm

sepiatone wrote:The Captive(1915) Cecil B. DeMille with Blanche Sweet. Excellent print.

How was it? It's been in my Amazon wishlist list since it came out, but new releases keep bumping it down.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 1:22 pm

TOIL AND TYRANNY (1915) was misleadingly labelled as the last part of a serial, WHO PAYS? This puzzled me, as it seemed like a stand-alone story, which in fact it was, the 'serial' being a series of social-type dramas starring Henry King and Ruth Roland, all of which are fortunately extant, this one showing the Griffith influence to a goodly degree.

In TOIL, King plays a labourer at a timber yard who falls foul of the foreman and is seriously injured for his behaviour. Ordered by the local doctor to leave off work for a while, King disobeys as his wife is seriously ill with consumption and they are in severe straits. Despite this, the boss gives him the sack, and he swears revenge and is supported by his fellow workmates who have been ordered to work more for no extra pay. His revenge takes a tragic turn, however...

As with many films of this type we are shown the contrasts between the 'high life' and what the workers endure, with extra contrast in the shape of the boss's spoilt daughter (Roland), who later realises the iniquity of her father's business methods.. Things come to a head after the workers strike, when their families are thrown out of the houses which are half-paid for in a scene reminiscent of that between Jane Darwell and Brian Donlevy in King's JESSE JAMES (1939).

It is therefore not surprising to find that King had a hand in the writing (and, uncredited, direction) of this powerful little movie, which is only let down by some unconvincing twists and details in the last few minutes.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 2:58 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:
drednm wrote:I watched a reconstructed version of All Dolled Up (1921) starring Universal's star Gladys Walton as a shop girl who gets involved in a plot to bilk a rich heiress (Florence Turner). Story is a little confusing because some material is missing, but Walton, who seems to have been a problem star and was dropped by Universal via the "morals clause," is very good indeed as the spunky little shop girl in a great big department store. When she spies a thief known as "the widow" swipe a necklace from around Turner's neck, she doesn't call security, she tackled and fights the big woman and restores the necklace to its owner. Later, during a botched abduction, she hod her own in a brawl with two men and a woman. Whether the stories about her association with Al Capone are true or not, Walton is certainly someone to look up. Few of her films exist, but I saw Sawdust (1923), The Untameable (1923), and A Little Girl in a Big City (1925) on various seller sites.


Found ALL DOLLED UP on YT and took your recommend and watched it. Apart from the parts which are in poor condition, an hilarious movie which had me laughing out loud several times. The final scrap was a hoot.


Well, I prepared that version and reconstructed the missing scenes using a synopsis that I found in Brazil. :mrgreen:
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostFri Oct 06, 2017 8:40 am

Inspired by the lengthening shadows of this time of year I re-watched The Bells (1926).
This is the Image DVD of some years ago by David Shepard. Music by Eric Beheim.

An excellent print and pleasing music really make this a pleasure.

[Spoilers]

Lionel Barrymore plays Mathias, a man in a bit of a fix, who controls an inn and a mill, but owes a large debt to “Frantz” played by lurking Gustav von Seyffertitz. Mathias keeps extending free drinks at the inn and credit both places in his quest to become the next burgomaster. It’s 1868 somewhere in Alsace.

The family is Christian. Near Christmas time, a rich Polish Jew stops by for a drink. For some reason he shows off his money belt full of gold to Mathias. Mathias sees a way out of his financial and family problems.

Boris Karloff is very effective as a visiting mesmerist (at a fair, and later) who says that he can make criminals confess their crimes. As others have said, his glasses look like those of Dr. Caligari.

The ending is a bit of a puzzle. Other than some pangs of conscience, and a (possible) early death; Mathias has gotten away with a terrible crime and left his family pretty well fixed.. Hmm.

http://www.silentera.com/video/bellsHV.html

Rick
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostFri Oct 06, 2017 10:03 am

>Boris Karloff ... his glasses look like those of Dr. Caligari.<

Also his hat, hair and coat!

>The ending is a bit of a puzzle. Other than some pangs of conscience, and a (possible) early death; Mathias has gotten away with a terrible crime and left his family pretty well fixed.. Hmm.<

No doubt, the piece (originally a Victorian play of Henry Irving's) is of its time. But those "pangs" are Poe-level horrific, and that (definite) "early death" is grim and justified.

Not a great film, but a solid one, and Barrymore sells it.

-Craig

(P.S. - it was the first Silent Feature I saw, I think, on early '70s local PBS.)
Last edited by wich2 on Fri Oct 06, 2017 5:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostFri Oct 06, 2017 3:36 pm

In The Captive (1915), War is declared between Montenegro and Turkey. Page Peters joins the Montenegran army and is promptly shot dead, leaving his sister, Blanche Sweet, and little brother, Gerald Ward, to manage the farm by themselves. Soon they are assigned a P.O.W., aristocratic Turk House Peters, who is amused by Miss Sweet's posturing with a pistol, but treats young Ward and his woolly lamb well. As time goes on, they get on, until the Turks invade the village and it is up to Peters to defend the farm from his countrymen.

This early Demille movie counted coup with Miss Sweet, recently recruited from D.W. Griffith's company. For the period, it was not an expensive movie; estimates are its budget was about $12,000, and its gross of about $50,000 offered a handsome profit for the growing concern that would become Paramount. The performances are good, particularly Miss Sweet's (unsurprisingly) and, despite the costumes, it struck me as essentially a Civil War movie about the reconciliation of the nations that had been transferred to an exotic locale, to avoid comparisons to Griffith's blockbuster Birth of a Nation.

I should offer an admiring word or forty about the Olive Films dvd I saw this on. It was a fine transfer from a perfectly preserved print, with many colored sections and a good supporting score by Lucy Duke. Although the modern viewer may find the film techniques of 1915 a bit telegraphic, for the period it is a solid work and worthwhile viewing for anyone interested in DeMille or Sweet's career.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 9:51 am

Red Bartlett wrote:
sepiatone wrote:The Captive(1915) Cecil B. DeMille with Blanche Sweet. Excellent print.

How was it? It's been in my Amazon wishlist list since it came out, but new releases keep bumping it down.


for picture quality there is much clarity considering this is 1915. If you're a fan of tinting and toning you'll like. In some parts Blanche Sweet's[who controls House Peters at gunpoint] role is 'sort' of like Lillian's in "The Night of the Hunter"(1956) though the two stories are way different. Also its great that DeMille put in the effort to save as much of his early efforts, like Pickford did, and we can enjoy them today.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 2:25 pm

There were three variant copies of HOMECOMING (1928) on YT. As the best-looking copy was in German, I chose the Fox issue, which (need to check) appears to be shorter and may have been censored. The film starts of in 1917 Russia with Geman POWs Richard (Lars Hanson) and Karl (Gustav Frohlich) in charge of a ferry with no other company but a scene-stealing cat. For the two years they have been prisoners Richard has talked of nothing but his wife Anna (Dita Parlo), so that Karl seems almost to know her as well.

After an encounter with some prisoners being sent to the lead mines Richard decides to escape, with Karl falling in with him. Hopefully the moggy was ok. After a goodly time, both are weakened and Richard is captures while Karl fetches some water. Karl returns to Germany and tracks down Anna...

A slight similarity to 1932's THE MAN FROM YESTERDAY, which I watched the other day but a very different film indeed. Atmospheric and more dramatic, despite the rather poor print presented here. Some of the desert scenes are rather artificial, but this is an intriguing melodrama, despite the predictability of some of the plot turns. Another film unknown to me, directed by Joe May, who gave us ASPHALT the following year.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 2:27 pm

Red Bartlett wrote:
sepiatone wrote:The Captive(1915) Cecil B. DeMille with Blanche Sweet. Excellent print.

How was it? It's been in my Amazon wishlist list since it came out, but new releases keep bumping it down.


It was uploaded to YT a month or so ago... Very good copy, too.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 2:57 pm

De Mille's The Girl of the Golden West (1915) showed up on YT. It's a Blackhawk print running under 45 minutes. Nice piano score, uncredited. The film itself is nothing special. Mabel Van Buren is "the Girl," with House Peters (billed as R. House Peters) as the mysterious stranger, and Theodore Roberts as the town thug. Some outside filming but mostly shot indoors with cheapo sets. The card game may be the highlight.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 5:25 pm

I was mildly disappointed with DeMille's The Girl of the Golden West (1915). I'm not sure what I was expecting, but what I got was a sort of hodge-podge handled in a broad fashion, as if Sennett had told his crew to come up with a short feature based on Bret Harte. You have the free-spirited young girl and the western types and the road agent, and they all aspire to something, they know not what, and they all act in an amusingly awkward fashion around each other. I'm sure it's what attracted Belasco to the idea in the first place, and that led Puccini to it, and so forth.

If it was good enough for Belasco, it was good enough for DeMille, so it was one of the properties that DeMille filmized early on -- before he quite knew what he was doing, apparently, or at least before he had learned how to edit things properly. The performances are a tad too stagy, the transitions a bit too abrupt.

However, it was still early days for Demille. His first movie, The Squaw Man, had come out eleven months earlier. Pretty soon he would be batting them out of the park.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 6:10 pm

boblipton wrote: filmized


Did you do this Uncle Bob, just to get my goat?
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 6:31 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
boblipton wrote: filmized


Did you do this Uncle Bob, just to get my goat?



No, but sometimes there's a bonus to writing well.

Bob
To remain ignorant of what occurred before before you were born is to remain forever a child.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSat Oct 07, 2017 7:36 pm

boblipton wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:
boblipton wrote: filmized


Did you do this Uncle Bob, just to get my goat?



No, but sometimes there's a bonus to writing well.

Bob


Well, let me know when you start! :D
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSun Oct 08, 2017 2:13 am

drednm wrote:De Mille's The Girl of the Golden West (1915) showed up on YT. It's a Blackhawk print running under 45 minutes. Nice piano score, uncredited. The film itself is nothing special. Mabel Van Buren is "the Girl," with House Peters (billed as R. House Peters) as the mysterious stranger, and Theodore Roberts as the town thug. Some outside filming but mostly shot indoors with cheapo sets. The card game may be the highlight.


Seems a bit short, unless taken from a speeded-up copy. Will watch it soon, anyway. At least it survives, unlike the 1930 version...
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostSun Oct 08, 2017 2:31 am

I had hardly heard of THE LADS OF THE VILLAGE (1919), and after watching it last night, had a peek in the relevant Rachael Low volume to see what the lady had to say about it - not a squeak!

The film seems to be a bit of a semi-amateur effort, with the main heroes not even credited in the IMDb entry for the film, and there appears to have been a bit of a legal argument about the copyright, at it was taken from a popular play of the time. Most of THE LADS OF THE VILLAGE is in flashback and tells of a maiden lady who is employed by a beastly foreign-sounding chappie lumbered with the unlikely name of Sir Karl Dusseldorf. While being president of the local Peace Association, he is also a spy and has the poor girl under his thumb over a bundle of foolish love letters. She is also being wooed by a decent fellow.

War is declared and the decent fellow is now an officer entrusted with some vital dispatches (with which he appears to be very careless) and the lady is now a nurse who is being blackmailed by Sir Karl and his fellow spy. The villains are temporarily thwarted, and the race is on to deliver said papers in Turkey. Somehow or other things come to a head in Baghdad, where there seems to be (unless I imagined it!) the odd brief spot of nudity...

In case this sounds as if I had a good time watching this film, I must disillusion you, as it seemed mighty tiresome stuff to me, perhaps because this sort of stuff has been done to death in later years. I suppose also I was expecting the film to be more of a drama on the lines of the stories about 'pals brigades' from towns and villages who joined up at the same time and fought and died together. The film is also mute, so would have probably benefited from a spot of music...
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostMon Oct 09, 2017 12:49 pm

Caught up with the rather short THE GIRL OF THE GOLDEN WEST (1915), which while by no means a great piece of work has a ripe performance from Theodore Roberts as the gambler-lawman who has the hots for the Girl of the title and forces his attention on the poor thing in no uncertain terms. Moves quite briskly, but that may possible be due to incorrect speed, as sometimes it seems a bit too brisk. Plenty of non-PC content, with shifty Mexicans ans well as an Indian maid given to licking food wrappers as well as stealing the odd morsel or two. And did Howard Hawks pinch the bit with the dripping blood for RIO BRAVO in 1958?
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostMon Oct 09, 2017 8:03 pm

The Danger Game (1918) mostly survives and is included in the new Ft. Lee documentary DVD set The Champion. Missing segments are filled in with brief narration. Storyline has Madge Kennedy as a "society girl" who writes a hideous novel and then sets about proving the novel's farfetched plot by undertaking a burglary. She's caught and accused of being the notorious "Powder-Nose Annie." Several very funny sequences, including the "scuttle of suds" bit, and Kennedy is quite a charming light actress. Subplot with caddish Leroy Hunter (Paul Doucet) is a bit slow, but Tom Moore offers a bright turn as Gilpin. Mabel Ballin, who I always associate with Westerns, co-stars. Nice job rescuing this film from several sources. Bright piano score by Donald Sosin.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 11, 2017 9:39 am

Last night I had the great pleasure of finishing Der Letze Mann, or The Last Laugh, from 1924. This is often referred to as Murnau's masterpiece and I can clearly see why. What a film! Everything about it was utterly fantastic. Inventive photography, lighting and sets. Dripping with atmosphere in every corner. Great performances on both sides of the (moving) camera. Emil Jannings was amazing. Perfect story/screen play. No bloat (and no title cards!). Very cool.

Nothing felt contrived or rehashed or mundane about this picture. Everything was out of love and joy of the art form. Cinema at its very best. And that score was simply magnificent.

While I look forward to seeing the rest of the films in the Eureka's Early Munau set, I suspect this one will be impossible to beat. It's definitely a masterpiece.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 11, 2017 1:25 pm

Another treasure from YT is the previously difficult-to-see THE GARDEN OF EDEN (1928). Presented here in a mainly superb copy, and with music from the splendid Robert Israel, this is an enjoyable romantic comedy (sixty years before 'rom-coms') featuring Corrine Griffith sneaking out of her baker uncle's shop in Vienna to find fame and fortune as an opera star, but finding herself in the horrid Maude George's nightclub, where her legs are the main reason for her employment. An attempt to supply the poor girl to sex-mad toff Lowell Sherman leads to the sack for her and fellow worker Louise Dresser. Luckily, Dresser is about to go on holiday to Monte Carlo, where she annually blows her widow's pension on having a grand time, and insists on Griffith's accompanying her...

I don't know whether THE GARDEN OF EDEN was ever 'lost', or if there were problems regarding its availability, but this is a very handsome production, with Griffith reminding me of Marion Davies at times, particularly in her reaction to eating (I do sympathise) oysters. Romance is provided in the shape of composer Charles Ray as well as his old goat of an uncle, and the usual mix-ups revolve around the fact that Dresser is a baroness and has suggested that Griffith is her blood daughter as opposed to being adopted. Some nice touches (SPOILER) such as the scene with the matches being lit when Griffith tries to flee in her underwear contribute to a most pleasing entertainment. Israel is on good form here, and his use of piano for the musical scenes is very effective.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 11, 2017 9:31 pm

I liked The Girl of the Golden West much more than The Captive for example. Yes, it was primitive but quite well paced and that "Rio Bravo scene" was really good. And some shots reminded me of The Cheat which was made later that year. So, not a classic but an interesting and enjoyable early western.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostWed Oct 11, 2017 10:33 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:Another treasure from YT is the previously difficult-to-see THE GARDEN OF EDEN (1928). Presented here in a mainly superb copy, and with music from the splendid Robert Israel, this is an enjoyable romantic comedy (sixty years before 'rom-coms') featuring Corrine Griffith sneaking out of her baker uncle's shop in Vienna to find fame and fortune as an opera star, but finding herself in the horrid Maude George's nightclub, where her legs are the main reason for her employment. An attempt to supply the poor girl to sex-mad toff Lowell Sherman leads to the sack for her and fellow worker Louise Dresser. Luckily, Dresser is about to go on holiday to Monte Carlo, where she annually blows her widow's pension on having a grand time, and insists on Griffith's accompanying her...

I don't know whether THE GARDEN OF EDEN was ever 'lost', or if there were problems regarding its availability, but this is a very handsome production, with Griffith reminding me of Marion Davies at times, particularly in her reaction to eating (I do sympathise) oysters. Romance is provided in the shape of composer Charles Ray as well as his old goat of an uncle, and the usual mix-ups revolve around the fact that Dresser is a baroness and has suggested that Griffith is her blood daughter as opposed to being adopted. Some nice touches (SPOILER) such as the scene with the matches being lit when Griffith tries to flee in her underwear contribute to a most pleasing entertainment. Israel is on good form here, and his use of piano for the musical scenes is very effective.


Watched this today myself and have to agree with my learned colleague's comments above. The whole film is a very enjoyable romp and is so well played that one follows it with ease and forgets wholeheartedly that it is silent.

Mr. Israel has given up his conducting baton for this one and instead is all hands and feet on the mighty theatre organ - with much research evident in his very capable and at times whimsical score.

Corrine Griffith is not quite the pretty picture that Marion Davies painted - but she does her best and does possess ample stocks in the comedienne stakes. Charles Ray is a little too painted up and at times looks too effete and Louise Dresser is to me the female equivalent of Lewis Stone - she was always old in all her pictures.

A good print, a good story and good music. What more could one ask for?
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Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2017]

PostThu Oct 12, 2017 2:50 pm

Kino's sale enticed me to buy the Blu of Nosferatu - what a travesty. The thing is stretch/step printed, giving it an annoying stop/start jerkiness that makes it nigh unto impossible to watch - who ever thought this looked proper and acceptable? A sad waste of excellent source material.
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