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What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 3:24 pm
by LostEmulsion
Want opinions on this one- We all love the juicy silent horror films- we grew up loving them. But, what silent horror film would you say would make the skin crawl on younger Matrix era audiences? Films that would get them from "Oh, that is so old school..." to "OMG! That.... is.... creepy....."?

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:09 pm
by EdibleCamphor
Play nosferatu with some really scary music. It may not have the gore of modern horror flicks but with the right score it'll really scare the bejeezus out of them.

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:03 pm
by MaryGH
"Nosferatu", also "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" (1920)

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:22 pm
by mwalls
I would not call the silent films "scary" (nor would I call current horror films scary -- just graphic). I would though describe Caligari as "disturbing". Not scary, but disturbing in an unsettling way with the bizarre settings and scenery. And then for Nosferatu, it has a "creepy" feel to it. The idea of being a victim of this creature making your skin crawl a little.

Both give a definite mood to me as I watch them.

Matthew

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:44 pm
by Donald Binks
Play "The Phantom of the Opera" in a vast cinema palace and have the cinema organ down in the pit on a lift working under hydraulic pressure and hiding under a green tarpaulin. Have a torrential downpour outside that blocks the storm water drains. Result - at the un-masking scene in the picture, the organ slowly rises out of the deep all by itself.

Although the above is a bit of wishful thinking, much the same thing happened one night at the State Theatre in Sydney at a late night film performance a few decades back. A number of young women in the audience were heard screaming.

:D

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:23 am
by Dave Pitts
When I taught 5th grade I made a point of bringing in silent movies when I could justify/get away with it. For example, on the afternoon before Christmas break, or the last day of school, etc. I usually brought in a comedy, such as The Circus, The Gold Rush, The General, Safety Last. But one day in social studies we had Edison's inventions as a topic and I brought in a smattering of silent film excerpts to show some aspects of early film. I showed Chaney's unmasking in Phantom, and it stunned the class.
I doubt they would have sat still for the entire feature -- way too much exposition for today's munchkins. The other thing is that today's movies have made them all literal-minded -- they expect detail, not suggestion, and action films have made them expect to see humans being eviscerated. This was brought home to me when I showed the 1945 Ten Little Indians, in which Roland Young is killed when a stone block falls on his head. This being 1945, you see the block teetering on a ledge, Young on a terrace, then a shot of his binoculars landing on the tiles with great chunks of stone as a crash is heard. As this scene finished, I saw a little girl from my class, one of the quieter students, get out of her chair and make her way around the class to my desk. I wondered if she was about to whisper to me that the scene had made her sick and could she go to the restroom. Instead she whispered, "Did Blore just get killed?"
"Yes," I whispered. "Didn't you see all the pieces of stone?"
"But why didn't they show his head getting crushed?"
.....By which I conclude the Lubitsch touch is in danger.

Re: What Silent Horrors Would Still Scare Horror Fans

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:15 am
by Battra92
LostEmulsion wrote:Want opinions on this one- We all love the juicy silent horror films- we grew up loving them. But, what silent horror film would you say would make the skin crawl on younger Matrix era audiences? Films that would get them from "Oh, that is so old school..." to "OMG! That.... is.... creepy....."?


So 18 year olds or people who were 18 when the Matrix came out (who would be 36 now?)