Remake question

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greta de groat

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Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 10:40 am

I've got another exotic question brought up by my library data modeling group. Can anyone give me an example of a film which was remade, and both films have the identical screenplay credit? I can find instances where the story is credited (first thing i did was look through Frances Marion's credits), but i'm talking about the screenplay/dialog. Bonus points if the screenwriter was no longer alive at the time of the remake. Bonus bonus points if both versions are on video.

Lacking that, there must be instances of a screenplay being credited to someone who was no longer alive by the time the film was made.

thanks!
greta
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Jay Salsberg

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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 11:02 am

Right off the bat I thought of THE PHANTOM CITY (1928, FN), which was remade as HAUNTED GOLD (1932, WB). Adele Buffington wrote both (and Blue Washington appeared in both). To further complicate matters, Buffington also wrote GHOST VALLEY (1932, RKO), which uses the exact same plot, almost scene-for-scene; but I don't imagine the studios cared much if someone plagarized their grade-Z westerns.
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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 11:10 am

Psycho (1960) and Psycho (1998)! Joseph Stefano for both films, with Robert Bloch's original book also credited in both.
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JFK

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The Fissioner of Zenda

PostThu May 25, 2017 1:08 pm

Not exactly what you were looking for, but....
ImageImage"The Prisoner of Zenda is a 1952 film version of the classic novel of the same name by Anthony Hope and a remake of the famous 1937 film version. This version was made by Loew's and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, directed by Richard Thorpe and produced by Pandro S. Berman.
The screenplay, attributed to Noel Langley, was nearly word-for-word identical to the one used in the 1937 version, which was by John L. Balderston, adapted by Wells Root, from the Hope novel and the stage play by Edward Rose, with additional dialogue by Donald Ogden Stewart."
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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 1:47 pm

Greta, not features, but:

During a big Writer's Strike in 1988, I recall that some old MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE TV scripts were reshot. I'd bet their credits were essentially the same.

-Craig
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Harold Aherne

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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 3:13 pm

Broadway Bill (1934) had a screenplay by Robert Riskin and story by Mark Hellinger. Its remake, Riding High (1950), carried those same credits, albeit with Jack Rose credited for additional dialogue.

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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 3:22 pm

Jay Salsberg wrote:Right off the bat I thought of THE PHANTOM CITY (1928, FN), which was remade as HAUNTED GOLD (1932, WB). Adele Buffington wrote both (and Blue Washington appeared in both). To further complicate matters, Buffington also wrote GHOST VALLEY (1932, RKO), which uses the exact same plot, almost scene-for-scene; but I don't imagine the studios cared much if someone plagarized their grade-Z westerns.


Another Adele Buffington example - Monogram remade their own Down Texas Way (1942) as Western Renegades in 1949, both scripted by Buffington, though she was credited in the former under a frequently used pseudonym, Jess Bowers.
Last edited by Brooksie on Fri May 26, 2017 11:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Spiny Norman

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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 3:48 pm

If television is involved, does it still count?
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greta de groat

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Re: Remake question

PostThu May 25, 2017 3:49 pm

Spiny Norman wrote:If television is involved, does it still count?


It does. Are you thinking Dinner at Eight?

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Re: Remake question

PostFri May 26, 2017 2:34 am

greta de groat wrote:
Spiny Norman wrote:If television is involved, does it still count?


It does. Are you thinking Dinner at Eight?

greta
Not specifically. There must be some UK drama that qualifies I suspect... Hm...

Of course, in the very early days of television, a repeat meant a repeat performance. For the fifties there might be many examples that were done twice based on the same adaptation. But that probably is not what you meant, and most examples would be at least half lost. (Just to name one random example, I think the BBC did Pride & Prejudice in 1952 and in 1958 based on the same adaptation.)
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greta de groat

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Re: Remake question

PostFri May 26, 2017 10:56 am

Thanks everyone for the great replies, this is very useful. I especially like the Psycho example, since it's well known and i think everyone would acknowledge that the remake is not really a substitute for the original.

I have a follow on question. Aside from the stage plays (which are frequently heavily cut of adapted), can anyone think of a screenplay which was published as a screenplay before a film was made of it? I've seen lots of screenplays published after the fact. I assume that the usual order of business is for a producer to hire or collaborate with a writer for a specific film, but i imagine that an aspiring screenwriter might write a screenplay and shop it around. Has anyone gone to the trouble of publishing it first? I know people shop stories around, but i don't know if it ever goes all the way to the screenplay stage before a producer formally starts putting together the team to work on the film.

thanks
greta
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Re: Remake question

PostSat May 27, 2017 9:09 am

Greta-

A tangential case I heard of recently:

http://www.jwaynefan.com/3sheets.html" target="_blank

Tay Garnett had a feature script he wanted to do, and tried to drum up interest for it by radio-ising it first. He explains at the end of this episode:

http://ia600200.us.archive.org/2/items/ ... sCurse.mp3" target="_blank

-Craig
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Re: Remake question

PostSat May 27, 2017 9:16 am

Does the writer of a source material count? since his/her novel or play is used as a guide for a scenario or screenplay. For instance Somerset Maugham's name comes up numerous times in this situation. For instance the 1920 Paramount version of JACK STRAW screen writing is credited to Olga Printzlau and Elmer Harris but the 1926 'unreleased' Paramount remake THE WAITER FROM THE RITZ has Maugham singularly credited as screenwriter of his own original play.

Back to the question:
*Lambert Hillyer -- for both versions of The Lone Star Ranger, 1919 William Farnum and 1923 Tom Mix
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Re: Remake question

PostSat May 27, 2017 9:48 am

Greta,
*Huck and Tom(1917) and I would guess Huckleberry Finn(1920) , they both appear to be the same story from Mark Twain, and both scenarios by Julia Crawford Ivers and both directed by William Desmond Taylor.
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Re: Remake question

PostSat May 27, 2017 9:57 am

Wasn't there a Twilight Zone lost/rejected script that was produced in a fit of nostalgia during the '90s? As I recall the result wasn't too good...
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Re: Remake question

PostMon May 29, 2017 5:31 pm

Addressing your second question, about movies released after a screenwriter died. Not all of these films used the actual credited screenplays, e.g., King Kong was extensively rewritten.

Edgar Wallace wrote a screenplay for King Kong but died a year or so before its release. Merian C. Cooper gave him a credit, and also a co-writing credit for the novelization.

George Hickenlooper's The Big Brass Ring was based on an unproduced Orson Welles screenplay; it came out at least a decade after his death.

Leigh Brackett got a screenwriting credit for The Empire Strikes Back, which was released two years after her death.

Melissa Mathison got a screenwriting credit for Steven Spielberg's The BFG which came out a year after her death.

August Wilson got a screenplay credit for Fences, which was released several years after his death. Denzel Washington insisted on giving him sole screenwriting credit.

As for screenplays published before production, one prime example is Carl Theodor Dreyer's screenplay for Jesus, which he never got to film. There are bootleg scripts available for some of Terry Gilliam's cancelled projects. In fact there is an underground black market of unproduced screenplays, and while they may not be "published" in the ordinary sense you can read a lot of the unproduced scripts on the annual Black List survey: blcklst.com/lists/
Several have eventually been produced, like American Hustle and Passengers, which was filmed almost ten years after it was submitted.
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greta de groat

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Re: Remake question

PostTue May 30, 2017 12:00 pm

Daniel Eagan wrote:Addressing your second question, about movies released after a screenwriter died. Not all of these films used the actual credited screenplays, e.g., King Kong was extensively rewritten.

Edgar Wallace wrote a screenplay for King Kong but died a year or so before its release. Merian C. Cooper gave him a credit, and also a co-writing credit for the novelization.

George Hickenlooper's The Big Brass Ring was based on an unproduced Orson Welles screenplay; it came out at least a decade after his death.

Leigh Brackett got a screenwriting credit for The Empire Strikes Back, which was released two years after her death.

Melissa Mathison got a screenwriting credit for Steven Spielberg's The BFG which came out a year after her death.

August Wilson got a screenplay credit for Fences, which was released several years after his death. Denzel Washington insisted on giving him sole screenwriting credit.

As for screenplays published before production, one prime example is Carl Theodor Dreyer's screenplay for Jesus, which he never got to film. There are bootleg scripts available for some of Terry Gilliam's cancelled projects. In fact there is an underground black market of unproduced screenplays, and while they may not be "published" in the ordinary sense you can read a lot of the unproduced scripts on the annual Black List survey: blcklst.com/lists/
Several have eventually been produced, like American Hustle and Passengers, which was filmed almost ten years after it was submitted.


Perfect, those are some great examples--thanks!
greta
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Christopher Jacobs

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Re: Remake question

PostSat Jun 03, 2017 7:08 pm

Not sure if this quite fits in any of your categories, but when Walter Hill remade Kurosawa's YOJIMBO (1961) and updated it to a 1930s American gangster film as LAST MAN STANDING (1996), Hill got screenplay credit but the story credit remained Ryuzo Kikushima and Akira Kurosawa. On the other hand Sergio Leone's unauthorized 1964 remake A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS had four different Italian writers credited for story and screenplay (including Leone himself) and three more uncredited, but not a single mention of Kurosawa, Kikushima, or YOJIMBO. The original YOJIMBO gave Kurosawa story credit and the screenplay was credited to both Kurosawa and Kikushima.
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Re: Remake question

PostThu Jun 08, 2017 12:44 pm

Dylan Thomas published THE DOCTOR AND THE DEVILS in screenplay format shortly before his death in 1953; but that particular script wasn't filmed until 1985.
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Re: Remake question

PostThu Jun 08, 2017 1:43 pm

Christopher Jacobs wrote:Not sure if this quite fits in any of your categories, but when Walter Hill remade Kurosawa's YOJIMBO (1961) and updated it to a 1930s American gangster film as LAST MAN STANDING (1996), Hill got screenplay credit but the story credit remained Ryuzo Kikushima and Akira Kurosawa. On the other hand Sergio Leone's unauthorized 1964 remake A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS had four different Italian writers credited for story and screenplay (including Leone himself) and three more uncredited, but not a single mention of Kurosawa, Kikushima, or YOJIMBO. The original YOJIMBO gave Kurosawa story credit and the screenplay was credited to both Kurosawa and Kikushima.


What neither filmmaker mentioned was that the storyline came from Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest. Kurosawa acknowledged being "influenced" by The Glass Key, but it's really the earlier novel that fits Yojimbo. Last Man Standing is even closer to Hammett, although with crucial plot changes by Hill (not always for the better).

The Coen brothers basically lifted the plot to The Glass Key for their Miller's Crossing, again unacknowledged, but this is all for another thread.

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