Silence (1926)

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telical

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Silence (1926)

PostMon Jan 29, 2018 5:17 pm

Did anyone see this recently? It was recently discovered, restored and presented.

Silence (1926)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017385/
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Hamilton's Grandson

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostMon Jan 29, 2018 10:42 pm

Wasn't it shown 6/4/2017 at the SF festival? I wasn't there, but the SF film festival website mentions it being shown.

Tinted 35 mm nitrate with French Intertitles restored as collaboration with French archive that imdb mentions.
Mark Hamilton (I) is on imdb.com
Joseph Hamilton (I) is on imdb.com
Gertrude Brooke Hamilton is on imdb.com
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Brooksie

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostMon Jan 29, 2018 11:21 pm

Yes, it was shown at San Francisco last year. Below is the capsule review I wrote at the time. I recall the opening sequence being especially striking.

Silence (1926)

The productions of Cecil B. DeMille’s short-lived PDC Productions of the late 1920s can be quite uneven - on one hand, there’s the excellent Chicago (1927) and Eve’s Leaves (1926); on the other, there’s forgettable fare like Hold ‘Em Yale (1928) and Midnight Madness (1928). Happily, Silence, recently rediscovered at the Cinematheque Française, is one of the better productions, a well made and glossy melodrama from The Phantom of the Opera helmer Rupert Julian.

Though the storyline would win no awards, it’s lifted by the always likeable H.B. Warner as a man whose girlfriend (Vera Reynolds) adopts a more suitable candidate as the ‘father’ of her illegitimate daughter. When the ruse is uncovered by a slimy conman (Raymond Hatton), the now-grown daughter (also played by Reynolds) takes matters into her own hands, with potentially tragic consequences. The Mont Alto Picture Orchestra provided a particularly good and at times unusually percussive accompaniment that greatly contributed to the suspense of the early scenes. Given how many of these DeMille productions have been rediscovered in only the past decade, there may be plenty more treats lying in wait for us.
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Rodney

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostWed Jan 31, 2018 8:43 am

Brooksie wrote:Yes, it was shown at San Francisco last year. Below is the capsule review I wrote at the time. I recall the opening sequence being especially striking.


Thanks for the review... that was one of the only reviews I was able to find! The restoration was done by the San Francisco Silent Film Festival, and I'm sure it's available from them at very reasonable rates in 35mm and digitally. SFSFF hired us to record the score, so it can be shown by festivals and repertory cinemas without hiring an orchestra (though I always recommend local musicians when possible). If you have a local film series, talk to them; and have them contact the San Francisco Silent Film Festival.

The opening sequence Brooksie refers to shows a lot of noises on-screen. H.B. Warner is being driven crazy by the hammering of men putting up the gallows he's to be hung on, and closeups of feet tapping, pencils tapping on desks, and a clock pendulum indicated pretty strongly that the scene should be scored by "effects" rather than music. The story is told in flashback, so we return to that sequence again at the end of the film. I liked the movie quite well, and the audience responded very positively to it.
Rodney Sauer
The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra
www.mont-alto.com
"Let the Music do the Talking!"
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Brooksie

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostThu Feb 01, 2018 12:01 am

Yes, that opening sequence definitely lends itself to a heavier-than-average use of foley, and it was very effectively achieved. Other than myself, Nitrateville member rudyfan also reviewed Silence on her website - http://strictly-vintage-hollywood.blogspot.com/2017/06/the-san-francisco-silent-film-festival_7.html. Her feelings largely echo mine. It was a solid little film - no masterpiece, but definitely worth watching.
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missdupont

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostThu Feb 01, 2018 9:10 am

There were several people who reviewed the film on the internet. Here is my review of the film from the festival that can be found in my full review of the Festival on the LA Daily Mirror.

Recently rediscovered at the Cinematheque Francaise, the 1926 film “Silence“ followed, a well-directed Rupert Julian film produced by Cecil B. DeMille and adapted from a famous play of the time, already reaching towards sound with opening scenes heavily dependent on audio effects to add to the dramatic pressure. A moving melodrama, an expressive H. B. Warner plays Jim Warren, a convict awaiting execution, who flashes back on a gripping tale of love and sacrifice. Jack Mulhall and Vera Reynolds in a dual role give good performances, while Raymond Hatton displays his talent as a slimy shyster. Mont Alto Picture Orchestra’s lush accompaniment and visceral effects won the musical prize for the weekend, blending romanticism with heart rending intensity.
Last edited by missdupont on Thu Feb 01, 2018 9:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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telical

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Re: Silence (1926)

PostThu Feb 01, 2018 7:16 pm

From her billing, it seems this is one of the only two or three existing movies that Virginia Pearson has more than a minute or two on film. She was once a starring actress but pretty much nothing remains of her starring roles.

Here is a long article on it with a video describing the film and restoration.

http://silentfilm.org/archive/silence" target="_blank

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