At the Movies, In the Movies

Open, general discussion of silent films, personalities and history.
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radiotelefonia

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PostSat Dec 20, 2008 11:26 pm

In ESPERAME MUCHO, the exhibition of MI NOCHE TRISTE is interrupted in order to have somebody in the stage to let know a child to go to the lobby because of an emergency at his home... :mrgreen:
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greta de groat

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PostSun Dec 21, 2008 12:12 am

I assume it was Abbott and Costello meet the Keystone Cops that i flipped by on TV, where Costello buys the Black Maria and then goes to see the Universal (naturally) version of Uncle Tom's Cabin? I imagine there were other clips in that, but that's as far as i got.

There's the fake newsreel in Citizen Kane. Oh, and the clip from Parachute Jumper in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane. A lot of movies about Hollywood must have screening room sequences, as well as movie premiere or preview sequences (i think Singing in the Rain was mentioned already?)

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Penfold

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PostSun Dec 21, 2008 3:16 am

His Nibs is a cracker; a Gregory La Cava film with Chic Sale as a small-town movie house owner/projectionist showing a romantic drama he's re-edited for local consumption and taken out the titles so he gives a running commentary instead; "There's a train journey to the city here; I've taken it out, it's the same train journey as in all the other films..." The film within the film is apparently a genuine ?unreleased? Chic Sale effort from a year or two earlier featuring a very young Colleen Moore....

The early sound version of 'My Old Dutch' sees Betty Balfour and Gordon Harker go to a 1915 cinema, where they see that year's silent version of the same title starring Albert Chevalier and Henry Edwards - these clips, beautifully presented, are all that survives of it.

In an otherwise dreadful 1950's comedy called Helter Skelter, quack psychiatrists show a patient, as therapy, a long sequence from Walter Forde's 1929 comedy Would You Believe It? which is the best thing in the film...

And, while not in the cinema, there is the repeated use of a clip from Hello Dolly in Wall-E.....[/b]
I could use some digital restoration myself...
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Penfold

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PostSun Dec 21, 2008 3:25 am

greta de groat wrote:Here's an offbeat one--in Across the Pacific (1942) Humphrey Bogart goes in a theater that's playing a silent Japanese film.

greta


I can't remember its title, but there is a late-period Japanese silent wherein the couple at the heart of the film go to the cinema and watch If I Had A Million ....the Charles Laughton in the office sequence, but cut away before the Bronx Cheer....
I could use some digital restoration myself...
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James Bazen

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PostSun Dec 21, 2008 6:01 am

There's that scene in the 1937 Stella Dallas near the beginning when Stanwyck and John Boles are at the movie theatre watching what looks to be a silent era melodrama with a rather rinky-tink piano accompaniment.

I've always wondered, does anyone know what film those scenes are from? The images whirl past so fast I can't recognize the couple.
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Pathe Lehrman

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 8:40 am

Bogdanovich's "Targets" has the sniper flipping out over seeing Karloff on the big drive-in screen and in the flesh, approaching him. And then there's De Niro at his most terrifying, "laughing" at the film in the theater in the remake of "Cape Fear." (Was that scene in the original? Haven't seen either film in a few years now.)

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Rodney

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 9:03 am

Back to silents: in Will Rogers UNCENSORED MOVIES the premise is that Will has gone from a proper, God-fearing, middle-American town to Hollywood to find out about the horrible morals and goings on there. On his return, he shows movie clips to the locals, including mock-behind the scenes footage, and gives a running commentary on them. The clips (which feature Will posing as well-known actors) are quite funny, and the Tom Mix parody has some very impressive stunt-work in the inevitable chase.

While DOUBLING FOR ROMEO has scenes on Hollywood movie sets, and lots of movie-making in-jokes, there are no theater scenes.
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Danny Burk

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 9:09 am

SOULS FOR SALE has a scene in an Egyptian theatre.
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Harold Aherne

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 2:05 pm

I don't think anyone's mentioned Make Me a Star (1932), a remake of Merton of the Movies, in which Stuart Erwin is the wide-eyed young hopeful trying to become famous. As I recall, the studio uses him for gag footage and then assembles it into a short subject, which is screened near the end of the picture. Contrary to his knowledge or expectations, Erwin is made to look completely ridiculous, and the pained looks on his face as his self-respect is being smashed with peals of laughter do not leave the mind easily. It's a more pensive and melancholy film than Movie Crazy, released the same year by the same studio, in spite of their comparable plots.

-Harold
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Rodney

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 2:12 pm

Harold Aherne wrote:I don't think anyone's mentioned Make Me a Star (1932), a remake of Merton of the Movies, in which Stuart Erwin is the wide-eyed young hopeful trying to become famous. As I recall, the studio uses him for gag footage and then assembles it into a short subject, which is screened near the end of the picture. Contrary to his knowledge or expectations, Erwin is made to look completely ridiculous, and the pained looks on his face as his self-respect is being smashed with peals of laughter do not leave the mind easily. It's a more pensive and melancholy film than Movie Crazy, released the same year by the same studio, in spite of their comparable plots.

-Harold


That of course reminds me of the screening room in THE CAMERAMAN, though that's not quite so painful. But, it's a kind of going to the movies.
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Jack Theakston

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 5:36 pm

Well, if we're counting screening rooms, a key sequence takes place in a screening room in THE DEATH KISS.
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rudyfan

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 6:17 pm

Penfold wrote:And, while not in the cinema, there is the repeated use of a clip from Hello Dolly in Wall-E.....[/b]


Yes and I have not been able to get the damned tune out of my head for days........
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rudyfan

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 6:18 pm

Danny Burk wrote:SOULS FOR SALE has a scene in an Egyptian theatre.


Really! ?

Is this on DVD?
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35MM

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 6:31 pm

quietone wrote:Also speaking of Cagney don't forget "Taxi".

And then there's De Niro at his most terrifying...


In Martin Scorsese's "Taxi Driver" De Niro (Travis Bickle) takes Cybill Shepard to a porn flick.
CURSES!
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silentfilm

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 7:09 pm

rudyfan wrote:
Danny Burk wrote:SOULS FOR SALE has a scene in an Egyptian theatre.


Really! ?

Is this on DVD?


No, but it has screened on TCM more than once.
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George O'Brien

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PostMon Dec 22, 2008 9:39 pm

Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard go to a matinee in BRIEF ENCOUNTER. They enjoy a Donald Duck cartoon and an over the top parody of a coming attraction before sneaking out, much to the "stony contempt" of a rather formidable usherette.
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Penfold

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PostTue Dec 23, 2008 5:40 pm

George O'Brien wrote:Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard go to a matinee in BRIEF ENCOUNTER. They enjoy a Donald Duck cartoon and an over the top parody of a coming attraction before sneaking out, much to the "stony contempt" of a rather formidable usherette.


The main feature was entitled 'Flames of Passion', IIRC.

For a silent screening seen in a modern film, there is The Wind That Shakes The Barley from Ken Loach, set during the Irish uprising and subsequent Civil War; the Irish Free State treaty is seen as a sequence of newsreels in an Irish picture house; seen playing the accompanying piano is our very own Neil Brand...
I could use some digital restoration myself...
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silentfilm

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PostSun Feb 15, 2009 10:18 am

I'm watching Les Vampires today, and in chapter six, newspaper reporter Philippe Guérande and his comic sidekick Oscar Mazamette go to the movie theater. The first thing shown is a newsreel, about a recent murder. As the police are walking around the crime scene in the film, Philippe spots Irma Vep (Musidora) and the Vampire Leader observing the crime scene! Of course his outbust disturbs the other theater patrons, as they have no idea what the master criminals look like.
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greta de groat

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PostSun Feb 15, 2009 6:21 pm

Hmm, maybe Gaumont had a thing for movies within movies. In the final installment of my review of the box set, i mentioned Perret's Le Mystère des roches de Kador, in which a psychologist tries to cure a woman by filming a reinactment of the traumatic event that left her crazy, and then shows it to her.

And in Feuillade's Erreur tragique, a man goes to the movies where a film by Gaumont star Onesime is playing and sees his wife and a man accidentally caught on film approaching Onesime and seeing the camera and covering their faces and hurrying away, which sets the rest of the plot in motion. But i thought it looked pretty lame--as though they would leave such a scene in the finished film!

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boblipton

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PostSun Feb 15, 2009 6:25 pm

Speaking of which, in Feyder's 'Le Pied qui étreint' , Musidora appears as Irma Vep.

Bob
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Hal Erickson

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PostWed Feb 18, 2009 3:37 pm

Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson going to the movies and watching a dreadful "jungle love" melodrama in the midst of their own romantic problems in BRIEF ENCOUNTER (Howard: "Thank heaven for Donald Duck")

The convicts in BRUTE FORCE watching a screening of THE EGG AND I (both films were 1947 Universal productions).

The upstairs murder during the screening of Griffith's THE SANDS OF DEE (erroniously identified as "The Kiss") in THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE.

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silentfilm

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PostFri Aug 28, 2009 10:23 pm

Here's one -- Fatty's Feature Fillum (1917), which is presumably lost. According to the synopsis, most of the short is set in a movie theater which is screening some spoof films.

Image

http://www.silentfilmstillarchive.com/f ... fillum.htm
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Mike Gebert

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PostFri Aug 28, 2009 10:58 pm

Maybe I'm the only one who's seen Inglourious Basterds, but not only is the climax set in a movie theater, but there's plenty of other movie stuff in it, from a cameo by Emil Jannings to a part that turns on fairly precise knowledge of The White Hell of Pitz Palu.
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Einar the Lonely

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 7:26 am

boblipton wrote:Speaking of which, in Feyder's 'Le Pied qui étreint' , Musidora appears as Irma Vep.

Bob


Wow! :shock: Is that film existing?? Available, perchance??

Maybe I'm the only one who's seen Inglourious Basterds, but not only is the climax set in a movie theater, but there's plenty of other movie stuff in it, from a cameo by Emil Jannings to a part that turns on fairly precise knowledge of The White Hell of Pitz Palu.


Also a poster of LES VAMPIRES, and another of UN CHAPEAU DE PAILLE D'ITALIE can be seen...
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

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dr.giraud

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 9:34 am

silentfilm wrote:
rudyfan wrote:
Danny Burk wrote:SOULS FOR SALE has a scene in an Egyptian theatre.


Really! ?

Is this on DVD?


No, but it has screened on TCM more than once.


It's on DVD, from the Warner Archive. It looks quite nice.
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dr.giraud

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 9:35 am

Mike Gebert wrote:Dillinger (1945), Dillinger (1973)...


Public Enemies (2009).
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dr.giraud

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 9:36 am

CoffeeDan wrote:Another Cagney picture (is there a pattern here?):

In WHITE HEAT (1949), Cody Jarrett's gang eludes the police by turning into a drive-in theater (the picture was AIR FORCE).


The picture they watch is TASK FORCE, with Gary Cooper.
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Damfino

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 11:08 am

Just to comment on a couple films others have mentioned -

The best scene in HOODOO ANN (1916) is when Mae Marsh & Robert Harron go see an old-fashioned western in a cinema.... The western (intentionally) looks like it would've been antique even in 1910; but Mae is absolutely gripped by it.

LUKE'S MOVIE MUDDLE was hilarious; I liked it more than many of Lloyd's later shorts even though he's not yet "in character".
And I was also tickled by Benchley's NIGHT AT THE MOVIES short - especially by all the usherettes he has to pass through before getting into the movie, each one more beautiful than the last.

Starewicz's short REVENGE OF THE CAMERAMAN has the distinction of being one of the few movies about infidelity & the cinema that is played by insects.

And by the way, the end of THE CROWD is at a vaudeville show, not a cinema. I think Vidor decided not to be as self-referential there as he was in SHOW PEOPLE!
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myrnaloyisdope

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PostSat Aug 29, 2009 5:09 pm

Ooh, Make Me A Star is one of my favorite films that no one's ever heard of. Stuart Erwin's performance is one of those one's that is just so unexpectedly great that it sticks with you. I've never seen someone play earnestness so earnestly. What should been a simple Hollywood farce gets turned on its ear by the wide-eyed innocence of Erwin, and his complete embarassment and humiliation when he watches himself on film is one of those absolutely gut-wrenching sequences that just makes you feel awful. Plus the film has Joan Blondell, and a billion Paramount cameos.

I'm surprised no one has mention the brilliant usage of a Tol'able David screening in William Castle's The Tingler.
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Einar the Lonely

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PostSun Aug 30, 2009 5:37 am

More miscellanous that come to my mind:

HISTOIRE D'UN CRIME (1900) by Fernand Zecca shows a convict awaiting his execution in his cell. The "flashback" of what happened before is played in a kind of "screen within the screen".

LILIOM by Fritz Lang - Charles Boyer goes to heaven, where all his bad deeds are shown to him as a kind of movie projection, mercilessly recorded by GOD's Mabuse-like ever-watchful eye...

CHRISTIANE F. - WIR KINDER VOM BAHNHOF ZOO (1981) shows a rotten movie theatre in Berlin where drug dealing occurs and junkies hang out. A brief clip from NOSFERATU can be seen on the screen. Drugs=Vampires.

Woody Allen is cured from his search for the meaning of life by watching DUCK SOUP in HANNAH AND HER SISTERS.

In ANNIE HALL he drags his girlfriend repeatedly to watch LE CHAGRIN ET LA PITIE.

In MEAN STREETS Harvey Keitel sees some Vincent Price movie in a theatre, I think it is THE HAUNTED PALACE. I think there is another scene where he watches THE SEARCHERS, but I can't quite remember.

An odd one, probably nobody here has seen: There is a notorious Nazi propaganda film called HEIMKEHR (1941) by Gustav Ucicky about the increasing hostilities between Poles and Ethnic Germans in Eastern Poland before the outbreak of WWII. The crucial scene is set in a cinema theatre. When Polish military appears in the newsreels the three German characters are forced to stand up and sing the Polish anthem. They refuse and a riot starts. The newsreel is from Fox, and the sequence starts with the famous opening fanfare. Also the MGM logo can be seen in the lobby and a poster of MAYTIME (1937) with John Barrymore.
Last edited by Einar the Lonely on Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

http://gimlihospital.wordpress.com/
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