Mabel Normand and female comedians?

Open, general discussion of silent films, personalities and history.
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JFK

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Mabel Normand Dines Out With Friends

PostSun Jun 24, 2012 3:17 pm

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http://looking-for-mabel.webs.com/009%2006%20JUNE%20PIXS/2736-0066b.jpg
"The signatures were all signed in pencil on the inside of the "Testimonial Dinner tendered by Samuel Goldwyn to Al Lichtman, General Manager of Distribution United States and Canada United Artists Corporation Roosevelt Hotel, Hollywood, May 15, 1928". Signatures include Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, D.W. Griffith, Ernst Lubitsch, Lupe Velez, Ronald Colman, Dolores Del Rio, Mabel Normand, Constance Talmadge, Norma Talmadge, Sid Grauman and Samuel Goldwyn, among others"

who else among the others????
Last edited by JFK on Fri Apr 06, 2018 8:59 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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sc1957

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Re: Mabel Normand and female comedians?

PostSun Jun 24, 2012 4:57 pm

So, three and a half years later, did the "major new bio" of Mabel Normand ever get off the ground?
Scott Cameron
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missdupont

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Re: Mabel Normand and female comedians?

PostSun Jun 24, 2012 6:06 pm

Joe Schenck and Al Lichtman also signed.
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FrankFay

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Re: Mabel Normand and female comedians?

PostSun Jun 24, 2012 6:57 pm

Louis Wolheim's signature is legible and elegant- a reminder that he was a cultured university man. I think if he'd lived longer he'd have had a lot in common with Edward G. Robinson.
Eric Stott
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JFK

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Mae West 1938:See Her Filmed Silently at Chicago Palace

PostWed Oct 10, 2012 2:28 am

If anyone knows how to embed the Mae West internet archive video below, let me know
CLICK LINK TO WATCH MAE WEST VIDEO
http://archive.org/details/MaeWestOnStageAtChicagosPalaceTheater

"{Silent} Home movie footage of a {February?} 1938 Mae West performance at Chicago's Palace Theater (now known as the Cadillac Palace).
From our Rhodes Patterson Collection. Chicago Film Archives holds the copyright for the films created by Rhodes Patterson."


(0:00) Footage of Palace Theater exterior;
(0:09) Juanita and her Skating Marvels;
(1:26) unknown act;
(1:36) Mae West, Milton Watson, and her "six leading men"

To read more of West's tour, which included a virginal Lionel Newman as orchestra leader,
and her contingent of "Overcoat Brigade" fans, start reading the Google Book excerpts
from
Simon Louvish: Mae West It Ain't No Sin (pages 333-334)
Another performer in her 1938 tour was magician José Frakson



Last edited by JFK on Thu Oct 31, 2013 10:20 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Mabel Normand and female comedians?

PostWed Oct 10, 2012 10:53 pm

Apologies to those who have seen this before, but this seems the obvious place to put a link to my article on silent film comedians. The review on this topic is the first third and the conclusion.

http://www.silentera.com/articles/heiss ... e2002.html

My basic point in the article is that women comedians tended to go toward comedies of social manners and away from farce and slapstick. Mabel was a big exception to this trend, and I talk about her in my conclusion.

I see in this festival report a review where I waxed and steamed enthusiastic over Ladies Night in a Turkish Bath. From what I hear in the Cinecon report for this year, there are a few people who agree with me.
"You can't top pigs with pigs."

Walt Disney, responding to someone who asked him why he didn't immediately do a sequel to The Three Little Pigs
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FrankFay

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Re: Mabel Normand and female comedians?

PostThu Oct 11, 2012 3:19 am

Gail Henry definitely did slapstick, though she was probably stereotyped into it because of her physical appearance.
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JFK

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BABE LONDON and CLARINE SEYMOUR

PostMon Dec 03, 2012 12:38 am

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Babe London Articles at silentcomedians.com
You can look it up:
Babe London Worked With More Film Comedy Greats Than Any Other Performer
AMONG HER CO-STARS
Eddie Lyons, Lee Moran, Ben Turpin, Andy Clyde, Buster Keaton, Harry Langdon, Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy
Billy Franey, Lige Conley, Charles Chaplin, Charles Chaplin Jr , Harold Lloyd Jr, Lloyd Hamilton, Mack Swain, Al St. John
Roscoe Arbuckle, Shirley Mason, Jackie Coogan, Phyllis Haver, Dick Sutherland, Hank Mann, Johnny Hines, Syd Chaplin,
Dot Farley, W.C. Fields, Douglas Fairbanks, Louise Fazenda, Otto Fries, Wallace Beery, George K Arthur, Henry Murdock
Billy Bletcher, Bull Montana, Harry Gribbon, Johnny Arthur, Kewpie Morgan, Priscilla Bonner, Jack Duffy, George Fawcett
James Finlayson, Earl Montgomery, Tom Kennedy, Bobby Burns, Gus Leonard, Dorothy Sebastian, Colleen Moore, Jimmie Adams
Earle Rodney, Joe Rock, Dorothy Devore, Alma Bennett, Neal Burns, Bobby Vernon, Vera Steadman, Charles Murray
Eddie Quillan, Blanche Payson, Chester Conklin, Alberta Vaughn
Jack Carson, Charles Ruggles, Noel Neill, Bob Hope, Betty Hutton, Shemp Howard, Leon Errol, Louis Wolheim
Larry Fine, James Gleason, Louis Nye, Guy Kibbee, Frank Mitchell, The Wiere Brothers, Marjorie Main, Roland Young
William Bendix, Marie Wilson, Emil Sitka, Jimmy Durante, Bing Crosby, Franklin Pangborn, Dorothy Granger, Keenan Wynn
William Frawley, Earl Mohan, Herb Vigran, Boris Karloff, Sterling Holloway, Moe Howard, Bob Cummings



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JFK

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DOROTHY GRANGER VIVIEN OAKLAND -USS VD:SHIP OF SHAME

PostWed Jan 30, 2013 10:00 pm

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Granger ....................... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivien_Oakland
Those who lament the filmwrecks endured by Keaton and Langdon should consider
the graphic (Paramount-produced) USS VD:SHIP OF SHAME
....................... http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244869/
which was the shared career low-point of Dorothy Granger and Vivien Oakland
(the Hal Roach/Leon Errol/Charley Chase/Laurel and Hardy/Harry Langdon co-stars)

Last edited by JFK on Fri Apr 06, 2018 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Richard M Roberts

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Re: DOROTHY GRANGER VIVIEN OAKLAND -USS VD:SHIP OF SHAME

PostThu Jan 31, 2013 12:31 am

Those who lament the filmwrecks endured by Keaton and Langdon should consider
the graphic (Paramount-produced) [u]USS VD:SHIP OF SHAME which was the shared career low-point of Dorothy Granger and Vivien Oakland
(the Hal Roach/Leon Errol/Charley Chase/Laurel and Hardy/Harry Langdon co-stars)



Why should we lament this as the "low Point" of their careers, I'm sure they were happy to do it to help the War Effort and most likely contributed their services gratis.


RICHARD M ROBERTS (who owns a print of the 1941 VD warning film KNOW FOR SURE, and that one's directed by Lewis Milestone).
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JFK

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Slapstick Divas and the Comic Venus

PostFri Apr 06, 2018 10:06 pm

Here’s info on new books on silent women comics.

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Slapstick Divas: The Women of Silent Comedy

Hardbound. July 1, 2017
by Steve Massa
“ Funny girls, those comediennes from the silent movies, knew shtick from slapstick. Mabel Normand, Marie Dressler, Bebe Daniels, Dorothy Gish, Constance Talmadge, Marion Davies, and Colleen Moore brought riotous laughter to millions around the world, yet their hilarity may seem hidden to those only familiar with Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Laurel and Hardy, and Harold Lloyd.
Discover the women of wit, from the supporting players to the stars. Author Steve Massa covers their contributions to comedy with in-depth analyses of the most hilarious heroines of humor, followed by 459 biographies of other droll divas from the famous to the forgotten.
Illustrated with 440 rare movie scene shots, formal portraits, candid behind the scenes photos, film frame enlargements, trade magazine advertisements, lobby cards, stage photographs, artist’s renderings and caricatures, and casting guide entries. Bibliography, and an Index.
About the author: Steve Massa is the author of Lame Brains and Lunatics: The Good, The Bad, and The Forgotten of Silent Comedy and Marcel Perez: The International Mirth-Maker.”





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Comic Venus: Women and Comedy in American Silent Film
For many people the term "silent comedy" conjures up images of Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp, Buster Keaton's Stoneface, or Harold Lloyd hanging precariously from the side of a skyscraper. Even people who have never seen a silent film can recognize these comedians at a glance. But what about the female comedians? Gale Henry, Louise Fazenda, Colleen Moore, Constance Talmadge-these and numerous others were wildly popular during the silent film era, appearing in countless motion pictures and earning top salaries, and yet their names have been almost entirely forgotten. As a consequence, recovering their history is all the more compelling given that they laid the foundation for generations of funny women, from Lucille Ball to Carol Burnett to Tina Fey. These women constitute an essential and neglected sector of film history, reflecting a turning point in women's social and political history. Their talent and brave spirit continues to be felt today, and Comic Venus: Women and Comedy in American Silent Film seeks to provide a better understanding of women's experiences in the early twentieth century and to better understand and appreciate the unruly and boundary-breaking women who have followed.

The diversity and breadth of archival materials explored in Comic Venus illuminate the social and historical period of comediennes and silent film. In four sections, Kristen Anderson Wagner enumerates the relationship between women and comedy, beginning with the question of why historically women weren't seen as funny or couldn't possibly be funny in the public and male eye, a question that persists even today. Wagner delves into the idea of women's "delicate sensibilities," which presumably prevented them from being funny, and in chapter two traces ideas about feminine beauty and what a woman should express versus what these comedic women did express, as Wagner notes, "comediennes challenged the assumption that beauty was a fundamental component of ideal femininity." In chapter three, Wagner discusses how comediennes such as Clara Bow, Marie Dressler, and Colleen Moore used humor to gain recognition and power through performances of sexuality and desire. Women comedians presented "sexuality as fun and playful, suggesting that personal relationships could be fluid rather than stable." Chapter four examines silent comediennes' relationships to the modern world and argues that these women exemplified modernity and new womanhood. The final chapter of Comic Venus brings readers to understand comediennes and their impact on silent-era cinema, as well as their lasting influence on later generations of funny women.
Comic Venus is the first book to explore the overlooked contributions made by comediennes in American silent film. Those with an interest in film and representations of femininity in comedy will be fascinated by the analytical connections and thoroughly researched histories of these women and their groundbreaking movements in comedy and stage.

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