Garbo set query.

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Michael O'Regan

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Garbo set query.

PostThu Apr 14, 2011 3:45 am

I'm pretty certain I read somewhere that this also contains what remains of THE DIVINE WOMAN. Is this so?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tcm-Archives-Ga ... 217&sr=1-1
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ymmv

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 4:07 am

Special Features

Includes: The Temptress (1926), Flesh and the Devil (1927), and The Mysterious Lady (1928)
Commentary by "Garbo" author Barry Paris on Flesh and the Devil
Commentary by "Greta Garbo: A Cinematic Legacy" author Mark A. Vieira on The Temptress
Commentary by film historians Tony Maietta and Jeffrey Vance on The Mysterious Lady
The Divine Woman: surviving 9-minute excerpt of this lost 1928 silent
Alternate endings on Flesh and the Devil and The Temptress
Settling the Score: goes behind the scenes of the TCM Young Film Composers Competition and the scoring of notable silent movies, including these Garbo classics
Photo montages on all three movies
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Michael O'Regan

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 4:44 am

Thanks.

I couldn't see any of that on the Amazon page - or is that from the actual box?
:oops:
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ymmv

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 5:32 am

The information is taken from the Amazon.com page, not the co.uk site.

Hint: you can replace co.uk with com in the URL you posted and you see the US item descriptions and comments.
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John Inglesant

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 7:48 am

If considering the purchase of this set, be advised that, in effect, you'll acquire only two "watchable" films, because Mysterious Lady is accompanied by the most execrable score I've ever endured. The film itself is marvelous--which makes the desecration of it by this atrocious score all the more unfortunate.
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George O'Brien

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 10:49 am

Why not simply watch it with the sound off? My copy of "The Docks of New York" has a lousy, repetitive organ soundtrack which I switched off half way through. A good silent film can be appreciated "naked".
"This bar of likker is now a bar of justice!"
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FrankFay

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 11:20 am

John Inglesant wrote:If considering the purchase of this set, be advised that, in effect, you'll acquire only two "watchable" films, because Mysterious Lady is accompanied by the most execrable score I've ever endured. The film itself is marvelous--which makes the desecration of it by this atrocious score all the more unfortunate.


Your mileage may vary- I thought the score wasn't all that bad and was good at times, certainly not the same reaction you had.
Eric Stott
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John Inglesant

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 2:17 pm

You compose for a film featuring an opera singer famous for her role as Floria Tosca & fail to include Puccinni??? Substituting ear-wrenching jazz saxohones instead? Mother of mercy! (As Rico said.) Wouldn't surprise me, however, that the wretch responsible for this insult had never heard of Tosca or Puccinni.
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FrankFay

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 2:22 pm

I'll give you those points- the composer really missed the mark with the opera quotes.
Eric Stott
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John Inglesant

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PostThu Apr 14, 2011 2:22 pm

George O'Brien wrote:Why not simply watch it with the sound off? My copy of "The Docks of New York" has a lousy, repetitive organ soundtrack which I switched off half way through. A good silent film can be appreciated "naked".


I've got the same, & "lousy & repetitive" it is--but beautiful music compared to TCM's score for Mysterious Lady!
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Michael O'Regan

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PostMon May 02, 2011 11:38 am

I actually found THE MYSTERIOUS LADY to be the best of the three titles, despite the inappropriate score.
:D
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Agnes

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PostMon May 02, 2011 9:57 pm

Teh surviving clip of "The Divine Woman" was shown as an extra after the TCM Silent Sunday Night broadcast of "Whild Orchids" ( 1929) this past Sunday.


Agnes
Agnes McFadden

I know it's good - I wrote it myself!
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Michael O'Regan

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PostTue May 03, 2011 5:57 am

BTW, that score was indeed poor. It was tasteless and there was way to much of it!!

Vivek Maddala is the composers name, I do believe.
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rogerskarsten

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PostTue May 03, 2011 8:18 am

John Inglesant wrote:You compose for a film featuring an opera singer famous for her role as Floria Tosca & fail to include Puccinni??? Substituting ear-wrenching jazz saxohones instead? Mother of mercy! (As Rico said.) Wouldn't surprise me, however, that the wretch responsible for this insult had never heard of Tosca or Puccinni.


To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

I certainly wouldn't condemn Maddala so harshly for his score (or his knowledge of Puccini); I thought it served the film quite well.

~Roger
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Jonathan

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PostTue May 03, 2011 8:39 am

rogerskarsten wrote:To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

Yet Carl Davis does quote Tosca in appropriate places during his beautiful orchestral score for The Mysterious Lady, as broadcast on German TV...
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Michael O'Regan

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PostTue May 03, 2011 8:48 am

Jonathan wrote:
rogerskarsten wrote:To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

Yet Carl Davis does quote Tosca in appropriate places during his beautiful orchestral score for The Mysterious Lady, as broadcast on German TV...


Oooooohhh.....is this version available anywhere?
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Harlett O'Dowd

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PostTue May 03, 2011 8:49 am

rogerskarsten wrote:
John Inglesant wrote:You compose for a film featuring an opera singer famous for her role as Floria Tosca & fail to include Puccinni??? Substituting ear-wrenching jazz saxohones instead? Mother of mercy! (As Rico said.) Wouldn't surprise me, however, that the wretch responsible for this insult had never heard of Tosca or Puccinni.


To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

I certainly wouldn't condemn Maddala so harshly for his score (or his knowledge of Puccini); I thought it served the film quite well.

~Roger


Are your quite sure of that?

I was only aware of TURANDOT still being under copyright in America.

Certainly TURANDOT is the only Puccini opera I have ever seen/done which included a licensing citation in the program.

One would think that Ricordi would have gone after Andrew Lloyd Webber years ago if they still had strict control over the entire Puccini catalogue.
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Robert Israel Music

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PostTue May 03, 2011 1:16 pm

rogerskarsten wrote:To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

~Roger


I am sorry, but this is not completely accurate. The European Union amended its copyright laws during the 1990s. The period of protection is 70 years from the date of the death of the author. There are other issues which may allow additional years to be added to a copyright status.

In the case of Giacomo Puccini, he died on the 29th of November, 1924. Tosca had been published and premiere in 1900 and most assuredly is in the public domain: even in Europe. However, new editions, new alterations or the incorporation of anything new to this score can be argued as a copyrightable edition. But, only the newly edited version. Again, providing that there are significant changes to the score: re-orchestrations, additional bars of music, rearrangement of harmonies, and so forth.

Turandot, on the other hand, is still under copyright and is not public domain. This is because Puccini died before completing the opera and a man named Franco Alfano, after a complicated process of eliminating potential composers, was chosen by G. Ricordi (Puccini's music publisher) to complete the opera based on Puccini's sketches and notes. The score was published in 1926 and Turandot premiered on April 25th, 1926. Alfano died in 1954, hence, part of the reason for its lengthy copyright status.

Tosca, the author of the source material (the french play La Tosca), the librettists and the composer (who was the last person to pass away among all of these artists), clearly meets the criteria of a public domain work and has been so for more than a decade.

It is of interest to note that a case brought before the French Court involved a painting from 1906 by Claude Monet. The argument was that its copyright protection, with additional years because of the two World Wars, gave the artwork non-public domain status. The highest French Court determined the Monet to be, in fact, in the public domain.
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rogerskarsten

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PostTue May 03, 2011 1:34 pm

:oops: Thank you for the clarification. Obviously my response was made without a true knowledge of the facts. Mea culpa.

~Roger
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Keatonesque

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Re:

PostFri May 04, 2018 4:06 pm

Michael O'Regan wrote:
Jonathan wrote:
rogerskarsten wrote:To be fair, TOSCA is not a public domain property (in spite of that fact that it premiered in 1900); the rights to all of Puccini's music are still held by the publishing house Ricordi, and they guard these rights fiercely.

Yet Carl Davis does quote Tosca in appropriate places during his beautiful orchestral score for The Mysterious Lady, as broadcast on German TV...


Oooooohhh.....is this version available anywhere?


7 years too late, but I just wanted to echo the above question. The soundtrack for "The Mysterious Lady" on TCM's now–OOP Garbo silents collection is rather bad (Vivek Maddala, if I'm not mistaken), but I could find no trace of whether there's a release with Davis' 1988 score used for Thames Silents.

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