Alla Nazimova and others....

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Nitratedreams

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Alla Nazimova and others....

PostFri May 06, 2011 12:46 pm

I'd like to know the survival rates of the following people: Alla Nazimova, George Loane Tucker, and Herbert Brenon. Thanks! :D
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Michael O'Regan

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PostFri May 06, 2011 12:55 pm

Survival rates???
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CoffeeDan

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PostFri May 06, 2011 1:24 pm

Uh . . . I think that should be the survival rates of the films of Alla Nazimova, George Loane Tucker, and Herbert Brenon . . . right, ND? :?
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Tintin

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PostFri May 06, 2011 1:27 pm

Nazimova's films are mostly gone, according to her biography by Gavin Lambert and the FIAF catalog, just these exist:
Eye for an Eye (1918)
The Red Lantern (1919)
Stronger Than Death (1920)
Madame Peacock (1920) partially extant
Camille (1921)
Salome (1923)
+ her sound films all exist

Apart from Camille and Salome, has anyone seen any of the others? I don't have the Lambert book handy and don't remember if he saw them or just said they existed in an archive.
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Harold Aherne

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PostFri May 06, 2011 1:29 pm

Info on Alla Nazimova's surviving films can be found here (not all archival holdings have been confirmed):
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat/nazimova.htm

She made 17 silents and 5 talkies; 7 of the silents are included in the FIAF listings. Thus her preliminary silent survival rate is 41% (not counting fragments). Her talkies all exist, of course, so her overall survival rate is about 54%. She also made a Liberty Loan short, "A Woman of France", in 1918, the status of which I don't know.

For Herbert Brenon, there is at least:

The Passion Flower (21) LOC
The Sign on the Door (21) LOC
The Wonderful Thing (21) LOC
The Spanish Dancer (23) Nederlands Filmmuseum, also the Kodascope
The Breaking Point (24) LOC
Peter Pan (24) Kino DVD
The Side Show of Life (24) Gosfilmofond
The Street of Forgotten Men (25)
A Kiss for Cinderella (25)
Beau Geste (26) LOC
Dancing Mothers (26) LOC, Kodascope version only
The Song and Dance Man (26) LOC incomplete?
Sorrell and Son (27) AMPAS archive, slightly incomplete
Laugh, Clown, Laugh (28) Warner DVD [Lon Chaney collection]
Beau Ideal (31) Alpha DVD; "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Transgression (31) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Girl of the Rio (32) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Wine, Women and Song (33) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue

Some of his later British films may exist as well. Someone else could tell you more about George Loane Tucker, but Traffic in Souls and the fragments of The Miracle Man are generally thought to be his only extant work.

-Harold
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salus

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PostFri May 06, 2011 3:10 pm

I always thought it was sort of strange that NAZIMOVA was the godmother of Nancy Reagan.
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silentfilm

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PostFri May 06, 2011 4:30 pm

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silentfilm

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PostFri May 06, 2011 4:48 pm

According to Ronald Maglioizzi's Treasures from the Archives, His Hour of Triumph (1913, Imp) with Jane Gail survives in Amsterdam and In Peril of the Sea (1913, Imp) with Matt Moore survives at the BFI. Both shorts were directed by George Loane Tucker.
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spadeneal

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PostFri May 06, 2011 6:57 pm

In addition to that, another British silent directed by Tucker was just shown at the BFI British Silents Festival in March, The Revenge of Mr. Thomas Atkins (1914).

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Nitratedreams

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PostFri May 06, 2011 7:08 pm

CoffeeDan wrote:Uh . . . I think that should be the survival rates of the films of Alla Nazimova, George Loane Tucker, and Herbert Brenon . . . right, ND? :?


Exactly!

I had a feeling there would be some confusion.... :)
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Rodney

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PostFri May 06, 2011 7:13 pm

Nitratedreams wrote:
CoffeeDan wrote:Uh . . . I think that should be the survival rates of the films of Alla Nazimova, George Loane Tucker, and Herbert Brenon . . . right, ND? :?


Exactly!

I had a feeling there would be some confusion.... :)


I was gonna say, their survival rate is zero... but fortunately we have some films.

For the record, there's material on Beau Geste at MoMA as well as LoC. The LoC material is missing some of the image along one edge.
Rodney Sauer
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www.mont-alto.com
"Let the Music do the Talking!"
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misspickford9

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PostFri May 06, 2011 11:20 pm

For Brenon Lummox (1930) exists in the British archives. Everyone forgot about it right up to Brownlow...but I found it when asked by Ullman's biographer, as Ullman's son had a major role in it. Dorothy Janis was alive at the time and an effort was made to talk to her about it, but she died maybe like a week after all the right people got connected.

Such a shame. I assume everyone has forgotten about it once again even though it was Brenon's first talkie. Add to that the BFI has the film on nitrate, I can't remember if they had the sound discs, but UCLA did. So there was hope it could be restored.
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Jonathan

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PostSat May 07, 2011 5:00 am

salus wrote:I always thought it was sort of strange that NAZIMOVA was the godmother of Nancy Reagan.

And of course the aunt of Val Lewton!
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Nitratedreams

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PostSat May 07, 2011 7:40 am

misspickford9 wrote:For Brenon Lummox (1930) exists in the British archives. Everyone forgot about it right up to Brownlow...but I found it when asked by Ullman's biographer, as Ullman's son had a major role in it. Dorothy Janis was alive at the time and an effort was made to talk to her about it, but she died maybe like a week after all the right people got connected.

Such a shame. I assume everyone has forgotten about it once again even though it was Brenon's first talkie. Add to that the BFI has the film on nitrate, I can't remember if they had the sound discs, but UCLA did. So there was hope it could be restored.


Theres a tidbit I wasn't aware of! I always have a fascination with "firsts" when it comes to film....like a first of its own genre/theme, or a director or actor's first talkie/silent feature....and most of them turn out to be lost (Damn you, nitrate!!).
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urbanora

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PostSat May 07, 2011 8:42 am

For Herbert Brenon, there is at least:

The Passion Flower (21) LOC
The Sign on the Door (21) LOC
The Wonderful Thing (21) LOC
The Spanish Dancer (23) Nederlands Filmmuseum, also the Kodascope
The Breaking Point (24) LOC
Peter Pan (24) Kino DVD
The Side Show of Life (24) Gosfilmofond
The Street of Forgotten Men (25)
A Kiss for Cinderella (25)
Beau Geste (26) LOC
Dancing Mothers (26) LOC, Kodascope version only
The Song and Dance Man (26) LOC incomplete?
Sorrell and Son (27) AMPAS archive, slightly incomplete
Laugh, Clown, Laugh (28) Warner DVD [Lon Chaney collection]
Beau Ideal (31) Alpha DVD; "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Transgression (31) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Girl of the Rio (32) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Wine, Women and Song (33) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue

Some of his later British films may exist as well.


One reel of Brenon's Victory and Peace (aka The National Film aka The Invasion of Britain) (1918) survives at the BFI National Archive. The BFI also has Leah the Forsaken (1912), The Long Strike (1912) and Ivanhoe (1913).

It's the Imperial War Museum that has George Loane Tucker's The Revenge of Mr. Thomas Atkins (1914).
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Einar the Lonely

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PostSat May 07, 2011 9:23 am

salus wrote:I always thought it was sort of strange that NAZIMOVA was the godmother of Nancy Reagan.


Not-so-strange that she was Val Lewton's aunt. :wink:
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

http://gimlihospital.wordpress.com/
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misspickford9

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PostSun May 08, 2011 2:53 am

Nitratedreams wrote:
misspickford9 wrote:For Brenon Lummox (1930) exists in the British archives. Everyone forgot about it right up to Brownlow...but I found it when asked by Ullman's biographer, as Ullman's son had a major role in it. Dorothy Janis was alive at the time and an effort was made to talk to her about it, but she died maybe like a week after all the right people got connected.

Such a shame. I assume everyone has forgotten about it once again even though it was Brenon's first talkie. Add to that the BFI has the film on nitrate, I can't remember if they had the sound discs, but UCLA did. So there was hope it could be restored.


Theres a tidbit I wasn't aware of! I always have a fascination with "firsts" when it comes to film....like a first of its own genre/theme, or a director or actor's first talkie/silent feature....and most of them turn out to be lost (Damn you, nitrate!!).


Thats why I hope SOMEBODY gets on it...it always breaks my heart to know we still have these things, they've made it 80-100 years...and they're sitting there...rotting away as nitrate in institutions that could save them but tend to not know what they have or the money to find out and restore it.
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Nitratedreams

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PostSun May 08, 2011 11:58 am

Harold Aherne wrote:Info on Alla Nazimova's surviving films can be found here (not all archival holdings have been confirmed):
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat/nazimova.htm

She made 17 silents and 5 talkies; 7 of the silents are included in the FIAF listings. Thus her preliminary silent survival rate is 41% (not counting fragments). Her talkies all exist, of course, so her overall survival rate is about 54%. She also made a Liberty Loan short, "A Woman of France", in 1918, the status of which I don't know.

For Herbert Brenon, there is at least:

The Passion Flower (21) LOC
The Sign on the Door (21) LOC
The Wonderful Thing (21) LOC
The Spanish Dancer (23) Nederlands Filmmuseum, also the Kodascope
The Breaking Point (24) LOC
Peter Pan (24) Kino DVD
The Side Show of Life (24) Gosfilmofond
The Street of Forgotten Men (25)
A Kiss for Cinderella (25)
Beau Geste (26) LOC
Dancing Mothers (26) LOC, Kodascope version only
The Song and Dance Man (26) LOC incomplete?
Sorrell and Son (27) AMPAS archive, slightly incomplete
Laugh, Clown, Laugh (28) Warner DVD [Lon Chaney collection]
Beau Ideal (31) Alpha DVD; "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Transgression (31) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Girl of the Rio (32) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Wine, Women and Song (33) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue

Some of his later British films may exist as well. Someone else could tell you more about George Loane Tucker, but Traffic in Souls and the fragments of The Miracle Man are generally thought to be his only extant work.

-Harold


What about the survival rates for director Theodore Marston? Actress Nance O'Neil? May Allison?
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earlytalkiebuffRob

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Re:

PostTue May 23, 2017 1:08 pm

urbanora wrote:
For Herbert Brenon, there is at least:

The Passion Flower (21) LOC
The Sign on the Door (21) LOC
The Wonderful Thing (21) LOC
The Spanish Dancer (23) Nederlands Filmmuseum, also the Kodascope
The Breaking Point (24) LOC
Peter Pan (24) Kino DVD
The Side Show of Life (24) Gosfilmofond
The Street of Forgotten Men (25)
A Kiss for Cinderella (25)
Beau Geste (26) LOC
Dancing Mothers (26) LOC, Kodascope version only
The Song and Dance Man (26) LOC incomplete?
Sorrell and Son (27) AMPAS archive, slightly incomplete
Laugh, Clown, Laugh (28) Warner DVD [Lon Chaney collection]
Beau Ideal (31) Alpha DVD; "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Transgression (31) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Girl of the Rio (32) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue
Wine, Women and Song (33) "print viewed" in AFI catalogue

Some of his later British films may exist as well.


One reel of Brenon's Victory and Peace (aka The National Film aka The Invasion of Britain) (1918) survives at the BFI National Archive. The BFI also has Leah the Forsaken (1912), The Long Strike (1912) and Ivanhoe (1913).

It's the Imperial War Museum that has George Loane Tucker's The Revenge of Mr. Thomas Atkins (1914).


HOUSEMASTER (1938) has been shown on [British] Channel 4, and YELLOW SANDS (1938) was coupled with IVANHOE at the National Film Theatre in the late 1970s / early 1980s as I saw the show!
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sepiatone

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Re: Alla Nazimova and others....

PostWed May 24, 2017 1:06 pm

adding to the Herbert Brenon save list there is The Passing of the Third Floor Back(shot in 1916, distributed 1918)
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earlytalkiebuffRob

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Re: Alla Nazimova and others....

PostFri Jun 02, 2017 2:03 pm

Reading Billy Milton's memoir reminded me that Brenon's SOMEONE AT THE DOOR (1936) was also shown by Channel 4...

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