What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

oldposterho

  • Posts: 561
  • Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostWed May 23, 2018 6:04 pm

A great call on Filmworker, definitely a must see. Decided to continue a Kubrick geek-a-thon with S is for Stanley, about Kubrick's driver and personal factotum. Seeing both together gives a pretty good picture of what working conditions around a Stanley film were like. Personally, my inner obsessive/compulsive is in awe of Kubrick's process but my heart bleeds for anybody within his circle.

Very informative and worth a look if you have any interest in Stanley Kubrick.
Offline
User avatar

s.w.a.c.

  • Posts: 1925
  • Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
  • Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostThu May 24, 2018 8:24 am

Since TCM is obsessed with showing movie series in their entirety this month, it's a great way to catch up with some titles I've yet to see in their proper sequence, and I'm halfway through the delightful Nancy Drew series starring Bonita Granville as the spirited teen detective. So far, Nancy Drew, Detective (1938) and Nancy Drew, Reporter (1939) have proven to be a lot of fun, and probably have a lot more comedy inserted into them than there was in the original books (I think I read one when I was 10 or 11, when the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew series was running on TV in the '70s). Teenagers seem to get short shrift in films from this time, and Granville and her guy pal Ted (Frankie Thomas) have a nice chemistry, and even get in some hep with-it lingo to the consternation of the adults. Ted does a bit of double talk, and his pesky little brother has a habit of imitating Donald Duck, just to be annoying (I suspect the child actor is dubbed for this, maybe even by Clarence Nash himself? It sounds pretty close, although I imagine lots of folks could impersonate the Duck). Lots of great character bits scattered throughout, fun to have Olin Howland as Sgt. Entwhistle having to do a turn in grandma drag. Looking forward to the final two in the series, maybe there'll be a rainy day this weekend...
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7407
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostThu May 24, 2018 9:41 am

Libeled Lady (1936) has a quartet of major stars and a meandering screwball plot that is mostly fun, though there are a few dull spots. Myrna Loy plays the wary heiress to William Powell's fake beau, while Jean Harlow plays the marriage-mad woman after Spencer Tracy, who cares more about his job than he does her. Several surprise plot twists at the end help tie this one up in a neat package. Walter Connolly plays his usual dithery father role. The film was, rather oddly, nominated for a best film Oscar, though it received no other nominations.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 3205
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostThu May 24, 2018 12:29 pm

Coming across an upload of THE WOMAN WHO CAME BACK, which I saw some twenty years ago, I was led to seek other films by director Walter Colmes. His first film, IDENTITY UNKNOWN (1945) was worth watching, being the story of a WWII vet returning home but without having any idea who he is, having been discovered in a French farmhouse with the bodies of three (or four?) other G.I.s

Played by Richard Arlen, the fellow jumps train in order to find his identity, having (oddly) been given the names and addresses of all the possibles. Along the way, he becomes friends with one widow, whom he stops from committing suicide, finds himself welcomed by Bobby Driscoll, who thinks he is his Dad, but is rather more trusting than one would find today, and helps out the families of the other two who are having problems of different types.

Despite the odd improbability and the fact that Arlen is playing a much younger man, this is a sympathetic, sensitive and decently watchable drama which appears to have been overlooked amongst the bigger films which dealt with returning servicemen.
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7407
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 8:01 am

The Egg and I was a huge hit in 1947 for Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray, based on the best-seller by Betty MacDonald. This is the film that launched Ma and Pa Kettle into their series of films. For some reason I always assumed this took place in Connecticut despite the Ozarky Kettles. But the book actually takes place in Washington. Whoda thunk it! This was the film that firmly established Marjorie Main (Oscar nominated) as a star character actress, and she steals every scene she's in. She'd made her film debut in 1929 as one of the "Six American Beauties" in support of Harry Fox in one of his Vitaphone shorts.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 5:30 pm

Just after the Fox Fanfare as one peruses the main titles does one immediately realise one is going to be in for a real treat. - Alice Faye, Carmen Miranda, Edward Everett Horton, directed by Busby Berkeley and in Technicolor. Yes folks, the picture is "The Gang's All Here" made to cheer up the war weary masses in 1943 and still very much cheering us up today.

From the moment the picture starts we know we are on a winner. The camera is immediately mobile in the opening sequence and the action is wonderfully choreographed. Our eyes are given a feast of movement and colour with the climax being that wonderful moment when a crane delivers a cargo of fruit - which naturally announces the appearance of Carmen Miranda. She is such a bundle of energy and naturally welcomed in small doses such as the occasional film. I think she would send anyone into a lunatic asylum if they had to spend a long time with her. Here her colourful personality is lit up with Technicolor as she gayfully fractures English and sings in her boom, chick-a-boom, chick, chick, chick-a-boom fashion.

Essentially a musical extravaganza there is a bit of a story which involves G.I. James Ellison on leave, falling in love with show-girl chantreuse Alice Faye, and who could blame him, why, I have been secretly in love with her for years. This love match is complicated because Mr. Ellison is engaged to a childhood sweetheart - Sheila Ryan. She is the daughter of his father's business partner. Now that father is a man who really needed Cinemascope for this picture - Eugene Pallette - and the business partner is Edward Everett Horton. What a wonderful combination.

Somehow or other as occurs in pictures, Alice Faye's entire show's cast gets invited to appear at a benefit to be put on at the country estates of the two business partners. Obviously austerity didnt play a particularly large role in wartime America and there were enough rich people around to do such outlandish things.

Busby Berkeley directs in an efficient and circumspect manner for the "ordinary" scenes but comes into his own for the musical numbers which are full of innovation and imagination. Thankfully he has left a lot of the kalidoscopic effects to one side and concentrates more on the usage of colour. He also experiments with fountains and neon hula hoops. Then there is that memorable scene where Miss Miranda's head-dress composed mostly of bananas seems to seamlessly blend into a backdrop to give the effect that she is carrying the whole lot on her head. (Bananas incidentally are featured a lot in the picture).

I could have had more of Edward Everett Horton. He is at his best in this picture - as a man who is the ultimate prude, wishing to do everything correctly without fun entering into the equation. Charlotte Greenwood was a wonderful choice to play his wife, although she is more featured with other cast members than with him. He does though get to play opposite Carmen Miranda in a scene which is quite hilarious. He is also a perfect foil to Mr. Pallette.

Also interwoven are Benny Goodman and his orchestra, Phil Baker and Tony di Marco. There are songs, dancing and comedy. What more could one want?

I think you will come to the conclusion that I enjoyed this picture immensely.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 5:48 pm

Martin Roumagnac aka The Room Upstairs (1946): Here's a movie that was clearly produced on star power: Marlene Dietrich! Jean Gabin! She's a beautiful woman in small town, a "merry widow" with several beaux on her string, waiting for the rich, ugly wife of one of them to die so he'll marry her. She runs into Gabin, who's a construction contractor, and of course they fall in together, much to the audience's lack of surprise, and with many a shot of Marlene's legs. However, as her past and their present are revealed, there is anger and snarling and things go downhill, with lots of Gabin snarling and Dietrich to-hell-with-it shouting.

The director Georges Lacombe may be remembered as a director of early Clouzot scripts, but he started off as one of the Surrealists in Paris in the 1920s. By the end of the 1930s he was a thoroughly commercial director whose big-screen career petered out in the late 1950s, but who continued to direct made-for-TV movies into the 1970s. This move has a 1930s air to it; one would think the War had never happened.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 5:50 pm

Donald Binks wrote:Just after the Fox Fanfare as one peruses the main titles does one immediately realise one is going to be in for a real treat. - Alice Faye, Carmen Miranda, Edward Everett Horton, directed by Busby Berkeley and in Technicolor. Yes folks, the picture is "The Gang's All Here" made to cheer up the war weary masses in 1943 and still very much cheering us up today.

From the moment the picture starts we know we are on a winner. The camera is immediately mobile in the opening sequence and the action is wonderfully choreographed. Our eyes are given a feast of movement and colour with the climax being that wonderful moment when a crane delivers a cargo of fruit - which naturally announces the appearance of Carmen Miranda. She is such a bundle of energy and naturally welcomed in small doses such as the occasional film. I think she would send anyone into a lunatic asylum if they had to spend a long time with her. Here her colourful personality is lit up with Technicolor as she gayfully fractures English and sings in her boom, chick-a-boom, chick, chick, chick-a-boom fashion.

Essentially a musical extravaganza there is a bit of a story which involves G.I. James Ellison on leave, falling in love with show-girl chantreuse Alice Faye, and who could blame him, why, I have been secretly in love with her for years. This love match is complicated because Mr. Ellison is engaged to a childhood sweetheart - Sheila Ryan. She is the daughter of his father's business partner. Now that father is a man who really needed Cinemascope for this picture - Eugene Pallette - and the business partner is Edward Everett Horton. What a wonderful combination.

Somehow or other as occurs in pictures, Alice Faye's entire show's cast gets invited to appear at a benefit to be put on at the country estates of the two business partners. Obviously austerity didnt play a particularly large role in wartime America and there were enough rich people around to do such outlandish things.

Busby Berkeley directs in an efficient and circumspect manner for the "ordinary" scenes but comes into his own for the musical numbers which are full of innovation and imagination. Thankfully he has left a lot of the kalidoscopic effects to one side and concentrates more on the usage of colour. He also experiments with fountains and neon hula hoops. Then there is that memorable scene where Miss Miranda's head-dress composed mostly of bananas seems to seamlessly blend into a backdrop to give the effect that she is carrying the whole lot on her head. (Bananas incidentally are featured a lot in the picture).

I could have had more of Edward Everett Horton. He is at his best in this picture - as a man who is the ultimate prude, wishing to do everything correctly without fun entering into the equation. Charlotte Greenwood was a wonderful choice to play his wife, although she is more featured with other cast members than with him. He does though get to play opposite Carmen Miranda in a scene which is quite hilarious. He is also a perfect foil to Mr. Pallette.

Also interwoven are Benny Goodman and his orchestra, Phil Baker and Tony di Marco. There are songs, dancing and comedy. What more could one want?

I think you will come to the conclusion that I enjoyed this picture immensely.


I thought this was Fox Fluff until that final Berkley production number. I'd say it was the most nightmare-inducing musical number I've encountered, except I've seen "The Heat is On" in Sunny Side Up.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 6:09 pm

Some brief comments on modern titles, mainly written as a warning to others:

'Retina" (2017) One of these mad scientist type things where an experiment goes wrong. Takes a while for one to make head nor tail of of it then ends up being ludicrous.
"Game Night" (2018) Supposedly a hit with a lot of people. I found it populated with people one could take an instant dislike to. It's a grotesque comedy that is not remotely funny.
"Terminal" (2018) I really can't comment as I fell asleep after about half an hour because I just could not work out what this picture was about.
"The Escape" (2017) Aptly named as I am sure this is what the audience would be trying to do to escape the unrelenting tedium of this dreary drama of a couple going through a marriage crisis.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 6:13 pm

antoniod wrote:HITCH-HIKE LADY(1935), a charming "Lady For a Day" knockoff with Alison Skipworth as a poor but proud British Mother of an expatriate Son who doesn't know that the "San Quentin" he's writing her about is the maximum security prison, so she comes to America to see him, having to hitch-hike from New York to California. After meeting Mae Clarke and two lovable rogues played by Arthur Treacher and Warren Hymer, all ends well, with the con-men conniving to have Skipworth's son released early so that his Mother need never know he was a "Jailbird"! About the only place you can see this Republic production is YouTube.


Watched this yesterday and quite enjoyed it. Amazing when you think of it - Alison Skipworth was born in 1863! Must be one of the few pictures Arthur Treacher played in where he wasn't a butler?
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 6:14 pm

boblipton wrote:"The Gang's All Here"
I thought this was Fox Fluff until that final Berkley production number. I'd say it was the most nightmare-inducing musical number I've encountered, except I've seen "The Heat is On" in Sunny Side Up.
Bob


At least the picture had some effect on you! I like a bit of fluff now and then. :D
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostFri May 25, 2018 6:58 pm

Brilliant Marriage (1936) Park Avenue deb Joan Marsh is almost ready to marry Hugh Marlowe in his screen debut, when she discovers she is adopted; her mother is in prison for life in France as accessory to murder of her father. She brilliantly reacts to this by spending a lot of time in Greenwich Village, where they make bad rum punch, and where she meets newspaperman Ray Walker, a sort of cut-rate Clark Gable from It Happened One Night. Since she figures she's not fit for decent society, she decides to marry him and they can flee to the South Seas. However, his jilted girlfriend, newspaperwoman Inez Courtney, is present to stir the plot whenever it looks like Ray is going to land Miss Marsh.

Once you get past the idiotic premise, it's a decent and efficiently run Poverty Row effort directed by Phil Rosen. He had ascended from the ranks of cameramen to director and was making a name for himself when sound came along and knocked him back into the Bs and although his sound output was never distinguished, he worked steadily through the end of the 1940s, just shortly before his death. This was just one of nine movies he directed in 1936!

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun May 27, 2018 5:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Offline

R Michael Pyle

  • Posts: 1677
  • Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 1:10 pm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 7:00 am

*GOT SOME SPOILERS AHEAD*
I watched my favorite actress, Barbara Stanwyck, in a film I'd never seen before, "A Lost Lady" (1934). Along with Missy are Frank Morgan, Ricardo Cortez, Lyle Talbot, Phillip Reed, Rafaela Ottiano, Hobart Cavanaugh, and others. Barbara Stanwyck is such a superb actress that anything she's in is worth watching, though this one is partly a mis-fire. She's about to be married when a jealous husband shoots and kills Stanwyck's fiance for a supposed affair with his wife. Stanwyck goes into a funk, and stays there basically the rest of the movie. Early on, she falls down a hill; is rescued by older man Frank Morgan. Morgan falls in love with her and proposes marriage. Although she doesn't love him, she eventually accepts. Interference by Lyle Talbot and Ricardo Cortez comes her way and nearly upsets the apple-cart. In the end true love wins out despite all odds. Who gets whom or not I'll leave to your watching. Well done by the actors and actresses, but a mis-fire, in my opinion overall. Too simplistic at the end. Does Stanwyck suffer from Post Traumatic Stress, as someone who reviewed the film at the IMDb suggests? Perhaps. And Frank Morgan gets to show his stuff again; this, outside of his bumbling usual self or his Wizard of Oz. He'd been in a couple of good films in 1933-4 that showed he really had some great talent. Here he shines more than all the others, frankly. There are a couple of scenes near the beginning where Stanwyck doesn't look as if she's practiced her lines well enough. Shame on the director(s), Alfred E. Green (and Phil Rosen, uncredited). Can't necessarily recommend this one to everyone. If you're a Stanwyck complete-ist, as I am, then go ahead. It's enjoyable enough, just doesn't satisfy with that ending.
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7407
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 8:27 am

Bluebeard's Ten Honeymoons (1960) stars George Sanders as a cad who hits upon a plan to make money fast: He seeks out and then murders rich women who have few or no close family. He's infatuated with a cheap saloon singer (Corinne Calvet) who wants money and lots of it. So he goes into the murder business to keep his honey happy. Everything is going peachy until his first victim's sister starts nosing around. Jean Kent, Greta Gynt, Maxine Audley, and Patricia Roc are among the victims. Based on real-life events and killer named Henri Landru. Charlie Chaplin used the same story as the basis for Monsieur Verdoux.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 9:00 am

drednm wrote:Bluebeard's Ten Honeymoons (1960) stars George Sanders as a cad who hits upon a plan to make money fast: He seeks out and then murders rich women who have few or no close family. He's infatuated with a cheap saloon singer (Corinne Calvet) who wants money and lots of it. So he goes into the murder business to keep his honey happy. Everything is going peachy until his first victim's sister starts nosing around. Jean Kent, Greta Gynt, Maxine Audley, and Patricia Roc are among the victims. Based on real-life events and killer named Henri Landru. Charlie Chaplin used the same story as the basis for Monsieur Verdoux.


I reviewed this in last year’s iteration of the thread. I thought it pretty awful.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Offline
User avatar

drednm

  • Posts: 7407
  • Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
  • Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 9:55 am

boblipton wrote:
drednm wrote:Bluebeard's Ten Honeymoons (1960) stars George Sanders as a cad who hits upon a plan to make money fast: He seeks out and then murders rich women who have few or no close family. He's infatuated with a cheap saloon singer (Corinne Calvet) who wants money and lots of it. So he goes into the murder business to keep his honey happy. Everything is going peachy until his first victim's sister starts nosing around. Jean Kent, Greta Gynt, Maxine Audley, and Patricia Roc are among the victims. Based on real-life events and killer named Henri Landru. Charlie Chaplin used the same story as the basis for Monsieur Verdoux.


I reviewed this in last year’s iteration of the thread. I thought it pretty awful.

Bob


Yes, I saw your review. Watchable but nothing special. Good cast.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com
Offline
User avatar

bobfells

  • Posts: 2954
  • Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:03 pm
  • Location: Old Virginny

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 12:00 pm

I rarely watch a new film mainly because it's rare that there's one worth watching.That said, I missed DARKEST HOUR and DUNKIRK that I understand are pretty good. Last night I accompanied my wife to see THE BOOK CLUB, a chick flick if ever there was one. There seems to be certain rules for this genre that date back to the silent era. For example, the lead female characters are idealized while male characters are either weak or brutes. In this film I was pleased to find that everybody was idealized. THE BOOK CLUB is a vehicle for stalwarts Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Mary Steenburg, and Candace Bergen. They all looked good and there was even a remark about cosmetic surgery though that was directed towards Fonda. The guys, Don Johnson, Andy Garcia, Craig T. Nelson, and a pudgy Richard Dreyfuss who arrives near the end, also look like they are no strangers to the face docs. There wasn't a baggy eye in the crowd.

The usual theme of looking for love in later life was portrayed as looking for sex although Candace Bergen functioned as a Greek chorus reminding her friends that something much more is needed than a roll in the hay. But the Hollywood conventions are fully on display: everybody is well off and nobody even mentions financial worries or heath issues; some characters have vague histories that the other characters seem aware of but the viewer is kept in the dark; Andy Garcia's character has no past so I kept expecting an ex-wife or an old girlfriend or at least a grown child to show up. But nobody's there. Diane Keaton's character (appropriately named Diane) doesn't even ask Andy about his earlier days. Some sort of sexual embarrassment is of course required and it's the guys who usually bear the brunt of this. Here Craig T. Nelson's character is thoroughly humiliated when his wife, Steenburg, spikes his beer with viagra. I guess the producers forgot about Bill Cosby and his habit of spiking women's drinks. Opps!

In the end, the film validates the Hollywood mantra that true fulfillment can only be found through sex, or maybe through show biz too. Steenburg does a neat tap dance near the end to rapturous applause. But hey, it's only a movie and I enjoyed seeing these baby boomer veterans in leading parts. Seeing the guys portray sensible, level-headed characters was a nice surprise. Don Johnson was a particular stand out. There was only a small crowd in attendance and I think I was the only guy. Another sign that it's a chick flick.
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 6:22 pm

Doomed at Sundown (1937): When Bob Steele's father, the sheriff, is killed with a knife, his deputies know the gang who did it, but their hangout is too dangerous to go to. Bob goes in and discovers Lorraine Randall working there. Her brother and she were passing through with $12,000 in traveler's checks. He's disappeared, supposedly working with the gang, while she's waiting for word from him. It's up to Bob to figure out who did the murder, rescue Miss Randall and her brother and get everyone out alive.

It's a Republic western, which means it's pretty good, with a script by George H. Plympton, camerawork by Bert Longenecker, and some of the fight choreography that they were developing at that scrappy movie factory. As a Bob Steele western, however, it's just so-so, however. There's some fine riding, and a few fine high shots of what I think is undercranked racing around Lone Pine, as well as a good trucking shot, but Steele was an athletic cowboy star, always ready to race across a long ridge and dive into a deep canyon,, at least in the early 1930s when he was starring in oaters for his father, Robert Bradbury. In this one, although he's fine in the riding and in a fight scene or two, there's none of that easy athleticism. Perhaps Republic wasn't willing to take such chances with a bankable star; perhaps it was his age. He turned 30 that year. In any case, it's a solid B western with a goodly assortment of hissable western bad guys acting nasty for a suspicious movie-goer to choose for a murderer.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Offline
User avatar

oldposterho

  • Posts: 561
  • Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 7:04 pm

I've wanted to see Krakatoa, East [sic] of Java ever since watching the Academy Awards as a kid when it was nominated for Best Special Effects, (it lost to Marooned). In my pea brain it was always conflated with 2001 from the year before and I guess I always expected a worthy successor to its Super-Panavision/Cinerama splendor. It was surprisingly difficult to finally track down, or I wasn't trying that hard, but finally managed to knock it off the list.

I see why it's dropped into obscurity. It's essentially a '50s era, John Wayne adventure type film padded into 'epicness,' leaving a bloated B script that is strictly by the numbers. It's additionally burdened by being over long with 'spectacular' shots held too long and about 100 extra closeups of Max Schell looking into the distance. That said, the (time adjusted) effects are pretty good and once the volcano action finally gets going things do move along. Glad I saw it but can probably wait another 40-some years for another viewing.
Online
User avatar

boblipton

  • Posts: 5904
  • Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
  • Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 7:07 pm

oldposterho wrote:I've wanted to see Krakatoa, East [sic] of Java ever since watching the Academy Awards as a kid when it was nominated for Best Special Effects, (it lost to Marooned). In my pea brain it was always conflated with 2001 from the year before and I guess I always expected a worthy successor to its Super-Panavision/Cinerama splendor. It was surprisingly difficult to finally track down, or I wasn't trying that hard, but finally managed to knock it off the list.

I see why it's dropped into obscurity. It's essentially a '50s era, John Wayne adventure type film padded into 'epicness,' leaving a bloated B script that is strictly by the numbers. It's additionally burdened by being over long with 'spectacular' shots held too long and about 100 extra closeups of Max Schell looking into the distance. That said, the (time adjusted) effects are pretty good and once the volcano action finally gets going things do move along. Glad I saw it but can probably wait another 40-some years for another viewing.


,... and Krakatoa is west of Java.

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
— Joe Darion
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 8:42 pm

And, talking of the glaring mistakes that Hollywood often makes, the opening of "The Emperor Waltz" (1948) designates the incorrect numeral associated with His Late Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty, Franz Josef II, Emperor and King of Austria-Hungary - as only No. 1. Then only just slightly further into the film it has the unmarried daughter of a Baron designated as a Countess. Such ignorance - and one would have expected better from Billy Wilder- one of the writers as well as director - as he had been born in Galicia! Still, I don't suppose everyone was as decidedly thorough as Erich von Stroheim.

Added to this we see Bing Crosby introduced to the picture as the ugly American abroad. He takes the customary informality of Americans to the heights of rudeness. Perhaps this was Mr. Wilder's attempt to show some contempt for his former homeland. Who knows? It certainly wouldn't have endeared Mr. Crosby to viewers of the picture outside of America - and perhaps even to some viewers inside that country.

But, the above are merely asides which didn't do all that much to dissuade me from liking the picture. I like pictures that show me "zer gude alt dayz" - all the glitz and glamour of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy at its peak. Besides which, it is another bit of fluff - as Uncle Bob informs us is the descriptive term to use in relation to pictures such as this.

Mr. Crosby is in Vienna as a sales representative of a firm selling gramophones and it is his idea to have an audience of the Emperor/King in order for him to endorse the product thus ensuring a lot of sales and making him a wealthy man into the bargain. Oh! The naivety! :D It just so happens that Mr. Crosby has a dog in tow who is the splitting image of "Nipper" - the dog who featured in the advertising for "His Master's Voice". ("Victor" in America).

Anyway, moving right along, said pooch becomes involved in a scrap with a poodle. This mutt is owned by the aforesaid Countess - Joan Fontaine. Bing becomes smitten - not with the hounds but with Miss Fontaine, although at the beginning his love is unrequited.

A whole lot of silly business is then portrayed on the screen which is not unusual for pictures of this kind until we reach the point where a marriage between the two is mooted. The Emperor is involved and shows Mr. Crosby wise counsel in suggesting that a Countess might find it a bit hard-going to give up life in a palace and change over to life in a tenement in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Naturally everything has to end happily, and it does of course, but we do get to see some lavish interiors of life in Schönbrunn, Tirolean countryside and other happy vistas. The trouble is, Bing doesn't get to do all that much in the way of singing. He is given just two numbers - English lyrics to "Ich küsse Ihre Hand, Madame" and "Im chambre séparée", although both are reprised a number of times.

Also in the cast are Roland Culver as Miss Fontaine's snobby father, Sig Ruman as a Vet, Bert Prival as a chauffeur who doubles as a ballet dancer and Richard Haydn as the Emperor.

I should add that it is all in gorgeous Technicolor.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Offline
User avatar

Danny Burk

Moderator

  • Posts: 1672
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:11 pm
  • Location: South Bend, IN

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 9:27 pm

boblipton wrote:,... and Krakatoa is west of Java.
Bob

I've never figured out whether they liked the sound of "east" better than "west", or if it's from ignorance. Or, maybe they went the long way around.
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 3076
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 9:30 pm

Danny Burk wrote:
boblipton wrote:,... and Krakatoa is west of Java.
Bob

I've never figured out whether they liked the sound of "east" better than "west", or if it's from ignorance. Or, maybe they went the long way around.


Most probably they were whistling "On the Road to Mandalay" at the time and got stuck on the line "Ship me somewhere's east of Suez..."
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
Offline
User avatar

bobfells

  • Posts: 2954
  • Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:03 pm
  • Location: Old Virginny

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSat May 26, 2018 10:04 pm

Donald Binks wrote:And, talking of the glaring mistakes that Hollywood often makes, the opening of "The Emperor Waltz" (1948) designates the incorrect numeral associated with His Late Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty, Franz Josef II, Emperor and King of Austria-Hungary - as only No. 1. Then only just slightly further into the film it has the unmarried daughter of a Baron designated as a Countess. Such ignorance - and one would have expected better from Billy Wilder- one of the writers as well as director - as he had been born in Galicia! Still, I don't suppose everyone was as decidedly thorough as Erich von Stroheim.

Added to this we see Bing Crosby introduced to the picture as the ugly American abroad. He takes the customary informality of Americans to the heights of rudeness. Perhaps this was Mr. Wilder's attempt to show some contempt for his former homeland. Who knows? It certainly wouldn't have endeared Mr. Crosby to viewers of the picture outside of America - and perhaps even to some viewers inside that country.

But, the above are merely asides which didn't do all that much to dissuade me from liking the picture. I like pictures that show me "zer gude alt dayz" - all the glitz and glamour of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy at its peak. Besides which, it is another bit of fluff - as Uncle Bob informs us is the descriptive term to use in relation to pictures such as this.

Mr. Crosby is in Vienna as a sales representative of a firm selling gramophones and it is his idea to have an audience of the Emperor/King in order for him to endorse the product thus ensuring a lot of sales and making him a wealthy man into the bargain. Oh! The naivety! :D It just so happens that Mr. Crosby has a dog in tow who is the splitting image of "Nipper" - the dog who featured in the advertising for "His Master's Voice". ("Victor" in America).

Anyway, moving right along, said pooch becomes involved in a scrap with a poodle. This mutt is owned by the aforesaid Countess - Joan Fontaine. Bing becomes smitten - not with the hounds but with Miss Fontaine, although at the beginning his love is unrequited.

A whole lot of silly business is then portrayed on the screen which is not unusual for pictures of this kind until we reach the point where a marriage between the two is mooted. The Emperor is involved and shows Mr. Crosby wise counsel in suggesting that a Countess might find it a bit hard-going to give up life in a palace and change over to life in a tenement in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Naturally everything has to end happily, and it does of course, but we do get to see some lavish interiors of life in Schönbrunn, Tirolean countryside and other happy vistas. The trouble is, Bing doesn't get to do all that much in the way of singing. He is given just two numbers - English lyrics to "Ich küsse Ihre Hand, Madame" and "Im chambre séparée", although both are reprised a number of times.

Also in the cast are Roland Culver as Miss Fontaine's snobby father, Sig Ruman as a Vet, Bert Prival as a chauffeur who doubles as a ballet dancer and Richard Haydn as the Emperor.

I should add that it is all in gorgeous Technicolor.


Oddly, this film was made in 1946 but held back two years before its release.
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 3205
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 4:19 am

Danny Burk wrote:
boblipton wrote:,... and Krakatoa is west of Java.
Bob

I've never figured out whether they liked the sound of "east" better than "west", or if it's from ignorance. Or, maybe they went the long way around.


Although I guess you could say it's East if you go the long way around...
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 3205
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 4:22 am

boblipton wrote:
drednm wrote:Bluebeard's Ten Honeymoons (1960) stars George Sanders as a cad who hits upon a plan to make money fast: He seeks out and then murders rich women who have few or no close family. He's infatuated with a cheap saloon singer (Corinne Calvet) who wants money and lots of it. So he goes into the murder business to keep his honey happy. Everything is going peachy until his first victim's sister starts nosing around. Jean Kent, Greta Gynt, Maxine Audley, and Patricia Roc are among the victims. Based on real-life events and killer named Henri Landru. Charlie Chaplin used the same story as the basis for Monsieur Verdoux.


I reviewed this in last year’s iteration of the thread. I thought it pretty awful.

Bob


Sounds like a comic version of SHADOW OF A DOUBT, which was remade a couple of years before the Sanders as STEEP DOWN TO TERROR. Now THAT'S a rare one!
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 3205
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 4:32 am

oldposterho wrote:I've wanted to see Krakatoa, East [sic] of Java ever since watching the Academy Awards as a kid when it was nominated for Best Special Effects, (it lost to Marooned). In my pea brain it was always conflated with 2001 from the year before and I guess I always expected a worthy successor to its Super-Panavision/Cinerama splendor. It was surprisingly difficult to finally track down, or I wasn't trying that hard, but finally managed to knock it off the list.

I see why it's dropped into obscurity. It's essentially a '50s era, John Wayne adventure type film padded into 'epicness,' leaving a bloated B script that is strictly by the numbers. It's additionally burdened by being over long with 'spectacular' shots held too long and about 100 extra closeups of Max Schell looking into the distance. That said, the (time adjusted) effects are pretty good and once the volcano action finally gets going things do move along. Glad I saw it but can probably wait another 40-some years for another viewing.


Odd that it should be hard to find, unless you were looking for Blu-Ray or Region 1 as I bought a copy ages ago. I recall seeing it when it opened (was it the ABC Portsmouth) and finding it enjoyable despite the rather risible song which started off with something like 'Sister, sister, have you heard...', which I think was being taught by a group of nuns... It turned up on the BBC umpteen years ago and was more entertaining than some of the reviews would have you expect.

Will have to check, but I think it was Mark Kermode who wrote of seeing this after a long period and being pleased that his memory wasn't playing him false...
Offline
User avatar

Jim Roots

  • Posts: 2769
  • Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 2:45 pm
  • Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 7:47 am

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:
Danny Burk wrote:
boblipton wrote:,... and Krakatoa is west of Java.
Bob

I've never figured out whether they liked the sound of "east" better than "west", or if it's from ignorance. Or, maybe they went the long way around.


Although I guess you could say it's East if you go the long way around...


I can remember when it first came out and right off the bat everybody was chorusing, "Krakatoa is WEST of Java, you dummies!" and yet the studio absolutely refused to consider changing the title. I've often wondered why. Surely it couldn't have cost too much to have revised the title card, even if they had to do it for 1,000 copies of the film.

Disney has a long track record of incorrect grammar in its titles, which it belligerently refused to correct. Most familiar is Honey, I Shrunk the Kids. Disney was so defiant, it called the sequel Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves. And then there was Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs instead of dwarves.

Does anybody recall exactly why the Krakatoa film wasn't correctly titled?

Jim
Offline
User avatar

Rick Lanham

  • Posts: 1983
  • Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:16 pm
  • Location: Gainesville, FL

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 11:22 am

Jim Roots wrote:
Does anybody recall exactly why the Krakatoa film wasn't correctly titled?

Jim


After it explodes, it's east of Java, west of Java, south of Java…

The film was apparently re-titled "Volcano" for a re-release.

Rick
“The past is never dead. It's not even past” - Faulkner.
Offline
User avatar

MaryGH

  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:10 pm
  • Location: FL

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

PostSun May 27, 2018 11:55 am

Psycho 2

Found a copy at a local thrift store yesterday, in pristine condition. Have had the VHS for many years and has been on my upgrade list. I very much like the sequel, it has a plot twist, and those mysterious notes left for Norman signed by his mother :shock: who he thinks is dead. Meg Tilly provides outstanding support as Mary, the girl Norman works with at the diner.
Petition: Turner Enter./Warner Bros: Please digitalize Tom Tyler's FBO silent film westerns

http://bit.ly/2ueCvHe
---
Aventuras de Tom Tyler

http://triggertomblog.blogspot.com/
PreviousNext

Return to Talking About Talkies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests