CINEMA ANECDOTES

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Nov 19, 2013 12:56 pm

I have found the 'What was the last film you watched?' thread very interesting, especially as it often leads me to look up movies I've never heard of or know little / nothing about. It also struck me that a thread of cinema-going memories may be of interest as I'm sure most of us can recall amusing or ridiculous incidents at film shows, many more entertaining or memorable than the films themselves. Obviously some of these will be more amusing to those who experienced them, but they do show that a film show is not just the movie!
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2779
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Nov 19, 2013 1:14 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:I have found the 'What was the last film you watched?' thread very interesting, especially as it often leads me to look up movies I've never heard of or know little / nothing about. It also struck me that a thread of cinema-going memories may be of interest as I'm sure most of us can recall amusing or ridiculous incidents at film shows, many more entertaining or memorable than the films themselves. Obviously some of these will be more amusing to those who experienced them, but they do show that a film show is not just the movie!


I used to work in a cinema, many, many moons ago now. I remember one occasion when I was plodding down the aisle during interval in my uniform and getting prodded by this old lady sitting on an aisle seat. She asked me whether I could ask the orchestra to play more quietly as she found them too noisy during the first half of the picture. :D
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline

Dave Pitts

  • Posts: 149
  • Joined: Sat Nov 30, 2013 9:55 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSat Nov 30, 2013 10:59 am

I remember seeing The Man Who laughs ('28) in Cleveland back in the 80s -- a campus showing, I think. It has a dog named Homo (played by Zimbo!!) and early in the picture, Homo goes missing. His owner (must have been Conrad Veidt as the main character, but I haven't seen this in ages) starts calling for him -- in larger and larger titles, until there's a giant "HOMO!" that fills the screen. The audience dissolved in laughter. There were two guys in front of me who were there together -- may have been gay -- anyway they laughed until I thought they would cry.
This year I saw an early Lon Chaney feature, Broadway Love ('18) which has a chorus girl character named Cherry Blow -- who was mentioned in enough intertitles to bring snorts of laughter from the crowd. Cherry Blow!!!!
Offline

Wm. Charles Morrow

  • Posts: 1107
  • Joined: Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:10 pm
  • Location: Westchester County, NY

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSat Nov 30, 2013 12:08 pm

Dave Pitts wrote:I remember seeing The Man Who laughs ('28) in Cleveland back in the 80s -- a campus showing, I think. It has a dog named Homo (played by Zimbo!!) and early in the picture, Homo goes missing. His owner (must have been Conrad Veidt as the main character, but I haven't seen this in ages) starts calling for him -- in larger and larger titles, until there's a giant "HOMO!" that fills the screen. The audience dissolved in laughter. There were two guys in front of me who were there together -- may have been gay -- anyway they laughed until I thought they would cry.


I also saw this film at a public screening, and recall some chuckling at the bizarre names: Gwynplaine, Barkilphedro, Dr. Hardquanonne, etc., and best of all, the dog called Homo. The biggest laugh came towards the end, when the dog attacked the villain and sank his teeth into the man's throat, and someone shouted: "Get 'im, Homo!"
-- Charlie Morrow
Offline
User avatar

Brooksie

  • Posts: 2630
  • Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2010 6:41 pm
  • Location: Portland, Oregon via Sydney, Australia

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSat Nov 30, 2013 1:26 pm

One I never tire of telling occurred at a Museum of Modern Art screening in New York about twelve years ago. The audience was, hands down, the rudest I have ever encountered - loud discussion all the way through; polite attempts to hush people receiving loud responses such as "Oh, there's a SHOOSHIE? Where's the SHOOSHIE?"

The highlight was the banter between a pair of older gentlemen who were sitting just ahead of me. Man 1 has a spare seat next to him. Man 2 wants to sit in it, for some reason. Man 1 explains that he is saving it for his wife. OK, fair enough.

Then, every fifteen minutes or so, Man 2 leans over and says "Where's your wife? I don't see your wife. Gimme your seat. I don't see your wife. Where's your wife?"
Man 1: "She's coming, she's coming."

Man 2 sits back, disgruntled. After enough time passes, he starts the argument again. "Give me the seat!"

After this continues for half the film, a third man intervenes. As quietly as possible, he tells them to keep their mouths shut and stop ruining it for everybody.

Man 2: Oh yeah? Well, why don't you keep your nose out of other people's business?
Man 3: When you're ruining this movie for me and everyone else, it is my business!
Man 2: Oh yeah?
Man 3: OH YEAH!

And the argument between Man 2 and Man 3 continues, far, FAR louder than the previous one! :shock:

I'm afraid to say that the Wife never did arrive, and before the lights even came up, Man 2 was up in arms about it. "Hey, you! Your wife never got here! I never saw your wife! You could've given me that seat any time you wanted ... etc etc etc!"

The punchline here: the film was a silent (ha!) - the 1924 Peter Pan, of all things! :lol:

Now that I look at the program notes, I see that Ben Model was accompanying that day ... I wonder if he remembers!
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2779
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSat Nov 30, 2013 2:25 pm

Two ingredients:

ONE: "JAFFAS" - A box of sweets made in Australia which are round balls consisting of chocolate on the inside with an orange flavoured coating on the outside. (They used to be the preferred "munchie" in cinemas before popcorn became the vogue.)

TWO - A cinema in Melbourne which used to exist, called the "Grosvenor" and which had a wooden floor.

METHOD: - During nearly any film performance a packet of these sweets would be dropped, with the consequence most audience members would hear balls rolling noisily down towards the orchestra pit. This usually happened during a highly dramatic moment when everything was quiet.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 02, 2013 1:08 pm

One of my more printable memories was during a local showing of Arthur Crabtree's MADONNA OF THE SEVEN MOONS (1944). At the beginning of the film the 'Gainsborough Lady' was unaccompanied by Louis Levy's minuet as there was a sound fault. Then suddenly from one part of the auditorium two old buffers began to hum "Da-da-da-da-da-dum..." as if it was the most natural thing in the world. Fortunately the sound was restored as they might have had trouble with the script.

Strangely enough, there is a connection with THE MAN WHO LAUGHS, as I had been to see the film in London a few years earlier, and fell into conversation with one of the old fellows on the train home, who then became a regular at local film society and rep shows.

Another occurence was at a showing of the German movie MEN. This 1980s film had attracted a very good audience of mainly twenty-something / female student types who almost filled the theatre. Cue a gentleman of a rather powerfully aromatic nature (I once sat next to him in similar circumstances and it was severely challenging to the nostrils) who made his stately way to a seat slap bang in the middle and guaranteed to inflict maximum damage on the poor girls' sensibilities! One suspects it was an unforgettable experience for all concerned!
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Offline
User avatar

Frederica

  • Posts: 4823
  • Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:00 pm
  • Location: Kowea Town, Los Angeles

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 02, 2013 2:31 pm

Aeons ago, when I was but a teenage vamplet, I went to see a showing of Errol Flynn's The Sea Hawk at a tiny, tiny, tiny theater in West Hollywood. The audience, strangely, consisted of men, all men, young men, middle-aged men, old men...men who were obviously close chums. "Oh," thinks I, as the light bulb suddenly switches on over my head. The film starts, I and all those men are enjoying ourselves watching Errol at his loveliest. At the point where the pirates dump Olivia de Havilland off the ship and onto that island, a disembodied but irritated voice from the audience said "Yes, get her out of there!"

The men and I howled with laughter.
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
Offline
User avatar

silentfilm

Moderator

  • Posts: 9045
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
  • Location: Dallas, TX USA

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 02, 2013 7:17 pm

At Cinecon, I remember two old men getting into a shouting match because one was making too much noise crumpling their snack bags or whispering to their neighbor.

I worked as an usher/projectionist and later an assistant manager when I was in college. We caught a guy masturbating during a screening of John Travolta's Urban Cowboy.

During the first week or two of sold-out shows of The Empire Strikes Back, a man attending the show by himself had some kind of allergic reaction and apparently choked on his popcorn. The lady sitting next to him ran out of the theater in hysterics, saying that she nudged him and he appeared to be dead. We pulled him out of the theater and called 911, but the paramedics were unsuccessful in reviving him. It was the first time that I had seen a dead person that wasn't in a coffin at a funeral.

During a nasty rainstorm in Austin in 1981, several neighborhoods had to be evacuated due to flooding. Families came to our 4-plex, which was at the edge of the flood zone, and stayed and watched several films all day while they waited for the rain to stop and the waters to recede. I remember standing in the box office watching the water rise up over the road about a quarter-mile away, but we never had to evacuate the theater.

During a midnight screening of some violent movie, possibly The Warriors, some guys got into a fight while the movie was going. Several of us employees tried to get them to leave, but they wouldn't, so the police were called.
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2779
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 02, 2013 9:50 pm

The State Theatre in Sydney has a Wurlitzer organ which comes up on a lift and used to be powered by hydraulics. When it wasn't in use, it was covered with a green tarpaulin in its resting place at the bottom of the orchestra pit.

There is the wonderful story that the State Theatre was showing "Phantom of the Paradise" (or some other horror picture) back in the 1970's and during one late night show, a ferocious thunderstorm hit Sydney causing torrential rain. All this water somehow got into the hydraulic system attached to the Wurlitzer organ and during a chilling moment on the screen, the organ all of sudden came up out of the pit, on its own, still covered in the sickly green tarpaulin. They say it took days for some young females to overcome the shock.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline
User avatar

Christopher Jacobs

Moderator

  • Posts: 2287
  • Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:53 pm
  • Location: Grand Forks, North Dakota

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Dec 03, 2013 1:55 am

Back when I was managing theatres, we were cleaning out the auditorium of spilled popcorn, popcorn tubs, cups, etc., after a showing of FLETCH, and in the last row I saw something I figured was a handkerchief or something that someone had dropped. It turned out, however, to be a pair of blue silk panties, heavily perfumed, at that! Some young couple in the back row obviously hadn't been paying that much attention to the movie!
Offline
User avatar

silentfilm

Moderator

  • Posts: 9045
  • Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 12:31 pm
  • Location: Dallas, TX USA

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Dec 03, 2013 12:17 pm

I also remember when I was checking an auditorium for Bo Derek's awful Tarzan that I heard someone pop the top off a bottle of beer. I approached the man and told him that outside drinks were not allowed--especially alcoholic beverages. So he promptly chugged the entire bottle in a few seconds, and then handed me the empty bottle!
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Dec 03, 2013 4:28 pm

British filmgoers may remember the old Scala in London which used to show excellent value double and triple-bills before it moved to a smaller venue. They will probably recall the friendly black cat who often appeared in the publicity leaflets. I made friends with this particular moggy one day and regretted my lack of any suitable titbits. On my next trip I was armed with ham sandwiches and possibly some extra ham. No sooner had I taken my seat when I was joined by my 'friend for life', who was suitably appreciative. No doubt other fans shared their lunches with the dear little thing. He / she was often a part of the entertainment and thought nothing of walking in front of the screen during a movie...
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Sun May 21, 2017 2:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Offline
User avatar

greta de groat

  • Posts: 1999
  • Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 1:06 am
  • Location: California

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Dec 03, 2013 6:53 pm

Speaking of cats, I remember seeing Of Human Bondage on a double bill at theatre in Saratoga, Ca. During intermission a cat walked out on stage, sat down, and started licking its butt, which won him a laugh and round of applause.

Greta
Greta de Groat
Unsung Divas of the Silent Screen
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostFri Dec 06, 2013 12:57 pm

At least that was better than an occasion at London's National Film Theatre in the 1970s or 1980s. In those days there was a big dish of sand outside each entrance for discarded cigarette and cigar butts. I remember one very cool and nonchalant kitty strolling up to it to 'do what a cat's gotta do'. Presumably the unfortunate person who had to clear the dish out was used to this..
Offline
User avatar

JFK

  • Posts: 1999
  • Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:44 pm

CINEMA ANECDOTES-

PostFri Dec 06, 2013 7:47 pm

Crocodile Dundee at a multiplex in Calumet City. The city was undergoing an uneasy racial transformation, and this was reflected that night by the increasingly violent threats being exchanged by attendees during the comedy’s opening minutes.
But then, Linda Kozlowski appeared on-screen in a swim suit, and all the anger was sucked from the crowd, as the audience grew silent in anticipation of what Kozlowski might do next. Plus side: no riot Down side: Crocodile Dundee sequels
Last edited by JFK on Sat Dec 07, 2013 7:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
Offline

sepiatone

  • Posts: 2324
  • Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 3:10 pm
  • Location: East Coast, USA

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostFri Dec 06, 2013 8:01 pm

I sat next to Lina Basquette at the National Gallery of Art during a retrospective of her late silent The Godless Girl. She came in with an entourage of about two people. The back of the Gallery are the high seats when you come into the auditorium and the theater sits sort of kitty-corner underground. She looked the spirit of health was all smiles and looked happy to be there. Sadly she passed away a few years later. To this day I always wonder why stars of movies sneak in after the picture has started and blend in with the darkness. Something magical about those lights going out but I always wonder.

On a much different note, but also at the Gallery,during a showing of Pale Rider (1985), one of Clint Eastwoods best, the movie ends with Clint riding off into the mountain range. Also in the closing shot is Sydney Penny, who was playing the daughter of Carrie Snodgrass. Anybody who has seen the film knows that Penny was quite an attractive young woman, a teen when this film was made. Anyhow when the credits started to roll and fade-out on Penny two guys sitting near me said out loudly to themselves "I'd f**k her!"
Offline

filmnotdigital

  • Posts: 264
  • Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2012 9:40 pm
  • Location: Carrboro North Carolina

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSat Dec 07, 2013 12:00 pm

Dear Sepia Tone: As far as stars sneaking in and blending into the darkness, when I was managing the Carnegie Hall Cinema in New York City circa 1977, Greta Garbo was spotted standing in the back with her coat still on during our revival of her "Anna Karenina." She didn't stay very long, she no doubt realized she had been recognized, and wanted to be alone.
Offline

sepiatone

  • Posts: 2324
  • Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 3:10 pm
  • Location: East Coast, USA

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSun Dec 08, 2013 1:36 pm

filmnotdigital wrote:Dear Sepia Tone: As far as stars sneaking in and blending into the darkness, when I was managing the Carnegie Hall Cinema in New York City circa 1977, Greta Garbo was spotted standing in the back with her coat still on during our revival of her "Anna Karenina." She didn't stay very long, she no doubt realized she had been recognized, and wanted to be alone.


cool, Garbo incognito at a screening, wow! You know the stars may not want to disrupt the screening by their presence, or want to view the reaction to a film, and possibly don't want to be bum-rushed by a horde of people. I once got to meet Roger C. Mosley(TC on Magnum, who flew the helicopter) at an aviation show. I was on my bike and rode away without saying anything then I heard him murmer "I guess he changed his mind". So I went back and shook his hand , got an autograph and continued with the show. My original reason for not troubling Mosley was that I thought he wanted to enjoy the fly-in in peace and not be disturbed by fans, but then I thought "this is why he is here, he knows that fans would recognize him and he'd be more than happy to shake hands and sign and yuk it up a bit". A nice guy and aviation enthusiast. But you see I was just being considerate towards him and wanted to show I wasn't a pestering fan asking a lot of questions.
Offline
User avatar

westegg

  • Posts: 1222
  • Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2008 9:13 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSun Dec 08, 2013 3:05 pm

The oddest thing I ever witnessed was during the original run of THE ELEPHANT MAN (1980) For some inexplicable reason a repairman (?) walked behind the screen and turned on a worklight, which created a scrim like effect. He worked on something for maybe half a minute to the bewilderment of the audience. Then he turned the light off.


:shock:
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSun Dec 08, 2013 3:17 pm

sepiatone's comment on Lina Basquette reminds me of a London showing of NON-STOP NEW YORK (1937) in 1977 or 1978. After the film, which had some perhaps unintended humour, my friend asked me if I had spotted Peter Bull. Unthinkingly I assumed he was referring to his film appearance, whereas in fact Mr Bull was sitting a few rows ahead of us and apparently gave us a look which should have turned us to a heap of ashes!

It might have been a good idea for him to have made his presence known so as to avoid possible embarrassment. On other occasions at the National Film Theatre we had occasional unexpected personal appearances (Bessie Love at THE BROADWAY MELODY [1929] and Val Guest at GOOD MORNING, BOYS! [1937]) as well as unscheduled but less surprising ones (John Cromwell at THE PRISONER OF ZENDA [1937] was scheduled for a lecture and would drop in on occasional shows. Ben Travers said a few words before ROOKERY NOOK [1930], but this was part of a season marking a new play of his in 1977 or 1978, but was a nice 'extra' as I was taking our Mum to see the film [plus A CUCKOO IN THE NEST, 1933] for Christmas).

Doubtless there were (and are still) plenty more, but alas work and finances usually limited my visits to one or two a month.
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Tue Oct 11, 2016 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2779
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSun Dec 08, 2013 4:01 pm

I was in Atlanta, GA in the summer of '85 and, having a free night, thought I would go along to see the picture "South Pacific" which was playing at the "Fox". I had no idea at that time, that this was a giant, old style atmospheric picture palace and was even more surprised at how many turned up. I thought the audience would consist of two men and a dog - instead 4,000 must have decided to go to the pictures that night. And! What a show. The sun set behind the proscenium, the organ came up, we had a sing-a-long and then there was the lucky seat prize. We all had to look under our seats to see if we had a lucky number stuck there. Guess who had it? Yes 'twas moi! Then, the most embarrassing moment of all - I had to rush from my seat in the dress circle all the way downstairs and then go up on stage in front of those 4,000 people in order to collect my prize! A memorable night indeed, and yes, I enjoyed seeing "South Pacific" too. :D
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline
User avatar

Jim Roots

  • Posts: 2432
  • Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 2:45 pm
  • Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 09, 2013 7:31 am

Donald Binks wrote:I was in Atlanta, GA in the summer of '85 and, having a free night, thought I would go along to see the picture "South Pacific" which was playing at the "Fox". I had no idea at that time, that this was a giant, old style atmospheric picture palace and was even more surprised at how many turned up. I thought the audience would consist of two men and a dog - instead 4,000 must have decided to go to the pictures that night. And! What a show. The sun set behind the proscenium, the organ came up, we had a sing-a-long and then there was the lucky seat prize. We all had to look under our seats to see if we had a lucky number stuck there. Guess who had it? Yes 'twas moi! Then, the most embarrassing moment of all - I had to rush from my seat in the dress circle all the way downstairs and then go up on stage in front of those 4,000 people in order to collect my prize! A memorable night indeed, and yes, I enjoyed seeing "South Pacific" too. :D


What was the prize?

Jim
Offline
User avatar

Donald Binks

  • Posts: 2779
  • Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
  • Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon Dec 09, 2013 1:24 pm

What was the prize?

Jim


It was nearly 30 years ago! (This old f**t can't even remember what happened yesterday sometimes! :D ). I think it was a book about the Fox theatre - but can't be sure.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"I was in love with a beautiful blonde one time. She led me to drink. It's the only thing I'm thankful to her for."
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostTue Dec 17, 2013 4:10 pm

Many years ago a local cinema showed Fellini's AMACORD together with Marco Ferrerri's THE LAST WOMAN. Not having seen the latter I decided not to read any reviews, though I had seen his notorious BLOW-OUT (I have seldom heard so much laughter at a movie). THE LAST WOMAN turned out to be a turgid movie with a pre-fame Gerard Depardieu having umpteen unsatisfying sexual encounters. The film ends after he removes the organ in question with an electric carving knife. This was very predictable as we had several shots of the knife in action, but none the less repulsive for that. Despite finding it a dreary, depressing movie, I had no genuine cause for complaint, my only legitimate gripe being that AMACORD was dubbed after having seen it subtitled in London.

A few days after, a friend who was, like myself, on the committee of the local film society, told me of three fellow members who, being into 'culture', turned up shortly before the Fellini, but just in time for the 'coup de grace' in THE LAST WOMAN and complained to the management! This struck us as amusing and childish. If they had bothered to watch it from the beginning it would not have come as a surprise - more a merciful release! Having seen BLOW-OUT, and aware of the 'X' certificate, I was at least prepared for something offensive!

After the show, I looked up a review of THE LAST WOMAN which was a good deal more favorable than my opinion, but it seems to have slipped into semi-oblivion despite its outrageous last scene.
Offline

earlytalkiebuffRob

  • Posts: 2701
  • Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostSun May 21, 2017 2:22 pm

greta de groat wrote:Speaking of cats, I remember seeing Of Human Bondage on a double bill at theatre in Saratoga, Ca. During intermission a cat walked out on stage, sat down, and started licking its butt, which won him a laugh and round of applause.

Greta


Which version of OF HUMAN BONDAGE was this? If it was the 1964 version, I can't say I blame your furry friend...
Offline
User avatar

maliejandra

  • Posts: 395
  • Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2009 5:32 pm

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon May 22, 2017 7:00 am

My friend Cory used to sneak foot-long Subway subs into the theater where we saw Pirates of the Caribbean together. He said it was partly because the Subway was right next to the theater and partly because he wanted to see if he could. He also clapped maniacally during random scenes when we saw Swimfan which irritated me to no end.

When I saw Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers in the theater for the first time, I had to pee about a half hour in but refused to leave to relieve myself. I did a lot of shifting around during that film.

My husband and I went to see The Dark Knight on opening night downtown and there was a massive line before we got into the theater. The ushers made sure there were no empty seats and were constantly making us move down so we were packed together properly. My husband had to sit next to the most stereotypical woman I've ever witnessed in a theater. All those comedy skits about people yelling at the screen are based in fact. She was obnoxiously animated and my husband said it kind of ruined the movie for him. We saw it again another time.

My dad, sister and I went to see The Wild Party screened at the Wexner Center when I first became really interested in classic movies. At the time I really disliked Shirley Temple (I'm not sure why now) and I got really annoyed when an elderly woman hollered out to her husband next to her that Clara looked like Shirley. Then toward the end, there is a scene where she and a man are running and the camera was under-cranked so they appear to be moving extra fast, and the audience started laughing at how silly it looked. I got pretty mad that they were laughing AT the movie, not with it.

My friend Tim and I saw a screening of The Birds at the Ohio Theatre and in the beginning when the credits are rolling and the sound is super quiet, he yelled from the balcony, "I'm scared!" and got a big laugh from the audience.

I can't remember which movie it was, but when we saw something at one of the big theaters here in the mall, my friend pointed out the mice scrambling around on the handrails by the stairs.

One of the most special Cinevent experiences I ever had was on a Monday when most of the patrons have left and it is mostly locals in the screening room, the projectionists filled time with a Spike Jones musical short. It had a follow-the-bouncing-ball format with the lyrics on the bottom of the screen and to my surprise, the audience started singing along. I was floored by the uninhibited group and the strong feeling of comradery that I felt that day. That is what makes those shows special.
Offline
User avatar

Mike Gebert

Site Admin

  • Posts: 5619
  • Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:23 pm
  • Location: Chicago

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon May 22, 2017 8:51 am

I think if there's a screening that sums up how different real film buffs are from normal people, it was this one when I was a kid.

I saw that some German cultural institute was going to play Nosferatu, at a screening room in the media library at the local university. Probably 14 then, I was excited, never seen it, what were the odds something so rare would ever be screened again in Wichita? It said the titles were in German, but it's Dracula, I can figure it out.

I get there and... I am literally the only person there, in the perhaps 20-seat screening room. There must have been a projectionist, but basically this is a screening for me. And the print is fine, except that... the score is basically free jazz. It would work better in a strip club than for a vampire movie. Nosferatu is walking along, boom chicka chicka chicka boom chicka chicka chicka.

It ends, and still no one, nothing. No sign of who even put it on. Like Jonathan Harker summoned to Dracula's castle, I've been the guest of ghostly, unseen hosts.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
Offline

Wm. Charles Morrow

  • Posts: 1107
  • Joined: Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:10 pm
  • Location: Westchester County, NY

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon May 22, 2017 9:29 am

There used to be a revival house on 8th Avenue in NYC called the Hollywood Twin. It was run-down and decrepit, the kind of place where winos would sleep all day, but they did show some good stuff back in the early '80s, and I went there several times. On one occasion, while the 1935 A Midsummer Night's Dream was underway, I saw a rat dash down the aisle. I guess he'd had quite enough of Mickey Rooney's Puck.

A year or two later, the Hollywood Twin switched to porn. Seemed more appropriate for the atmosphere of the place.
-- Charlie Morrow
Offline

wich2

  • Posts: 1345
  • Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 11:11 am

Re: CINEMA ANECDOTES

PostMon May 22, 2017 10:16 am

For a while, that was one of the great revival venues*, WCM.

I caught up with all of the Connery BONDs in a festival there...

-Craig

*Theatre 80. Little Carnegie. Bleecker. Thalia. Cinema Village. Metro. Regency. "Great days, indeed."
Next

Return to Talking About Talkies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests