What is the last film you watched? (2017)

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Donald Binks

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Nov 25, 2017 3:58 pm

wich2 wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:
boblipton wrote:Today's movie with my cousin, Justice League (2017)...
Bob


Must be good going through one's second childhood, and actually enjoying this sort of picture? :D


Heroic Fantasy Adventure is not necessarily childish:

King Arthur - Lord of the Rings - Star Wars - etc.


King Arthur may gain a guernsey but "Lord of the Rings" and "Star Wars" have never been on my radar...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Nov 25, 2017 8:29 pm

Not even the Rings books, which are giant bestsellers written in the Forties, and published in the Fifties?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Nov 25, 2017 8:34 pm

Another Australian film (I seem to be on a binge) after The Eye of the Storm last week, I caught Caddie (1976) starring Helen Morse as a mother with 2 kids in 1920s Sydney who has to support herself and kids after she bails from an abusive marriage. She becomes a barmaid and makes her own way but when the Great Depression hits, things get rough. She thinks about emigrating but can't leave the country with her kids without her husband's permission. If she leaves alone, he or his family can claim the kids. The film won a bunch of Australian film awards and established Morse as a star. Jack Thompson, Jacki Weaver, and Melissa Jaffer co-star.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Nov 25, 2017 11:43 pm

wich2 wrote:Not even the Rings books, which are giant bestsellers written in the Forties, and published in the Fifties?


Nup, Just not into it.
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 4:13 am

I hadn't seen Leslie Howard in a picture for ages, so I was happy to put on "Service for Ladies" (1932) (known in America as "Reserved for Ladies".) This was a picture with a lot of Hungarian imput. One of the writers was Lajos Biró who adapted it from a story by Ernest Vajda; the director was (Sir) Alexander Korda and Howard himself, the quintessential Englishman, was born of Hungarian parents. One can therefore feel the Continental touch here and there - especially when the scenes move to a ski lodge up in the alps frequented by Countesses and Kings travelling incognito.

Mr. Howard is a rather impulsive fellow. He picks up some parcels a young lady drops, follows her to her hotel, becoming more and more enamoured of her as the minutes tick by. Then, quite suddenly he leaves his job as a renowned head waiter at a posh restaurant and swans off to the alps chasing the young thing. I suppose all this is quite natural if the seat of affection is Elizabeth Allan.

This is a romantic comedy of manners - or more to the point, class distinctions and how assumptions can be made that are totally incorrect. Watch for this start off as the King recognises Mr. Howard from his head-waitering days and asks him to join his table. There is a message in there somewhere for those adroit enough to seek it, however most audiences would most probably just prefer to sit back and enjoy the fun and frolic - and there is a lot of it there.

Mr. Howard sails through this picture at his debonair best and exudes charm in every direction. He is ably assisted by the said Ms Allan and Morton Selten as her world-wise father. Benita Hume lends her presence as an enchanting Countess and George Grossmith is the King posing as Mr. Westlake.

This was a Paramount English production apparently made on the cheap, but it exudes a distinct quality about it plus it is pre-code which means that the Continental "ways" don't have to be buttoned up. Good fun even though we are looking on a more graceful age which has all but departed.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 4:50 am

Following on with the theme of class distinction, was another British film (where better to do it?) - "Freedom of the Seas" (1934). One presumes this film to be a comedy if its direction by Marcel Varnel is anything to go by. It starts off so, but then drifts into the realm of drama half-way through with the main character changing his spots as well.

Clifford Mollison is a clerk in a solicitor's office. His boss is of the usual barking orders variety - H.F. Maltby and Mr. Mollison is engaging himself in an unrequited love affair from afar with the daughter - Wendy Barrie. Meeting an old friend, he is led somewhat astray which results in him losing him job. He is told in no uncertain terms that as a lowly clerk, he couldn't possibly marry the object of his affections. As we are in the teen years of the 20th Century, England is at war so the poor blighter goes off and joins the Navy ending up with a commission.

As coincidences occur quite often in pictures, it is not surprising that he gets a job as a Navy Inspector on board a merchant vessel that just so happens to have the love of his life and her father on board. (They were picked up by this ship after the passenger liner they were on was sunk).

Up to this point in the picture Mr. Mollinson has played the hapless idiot, but now he is in the Navy and in charge of things, he becomes all serious and we enter a bit of drama. There is nefarious activity going on, on board. Some fellow is in league with the Germans and there is a plot afoot to sink the boat and get the insurance on the cargo.

Another passenger, also picked up from a lifeboat is a saucy little American showgirl- Zelma O'Neal who overhears a Morse code message being transmitted, but it is OK as she is able to tap dance it out for Mr. Mollison.

It's all a bit strange really, a sort of Biggles adventure type story thrown in on top of the usual comedic sad sack type character. Having said that though, I quite enjoyed the romp and took it in as a light and fluffy bit of entertainment. Needless to say all ends up in happy bliss.
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 5:15 am

Still in England, I came across another rather obscure entry in the class distinction stakes - "Lord of the Manor" (1933) which was quite obviously a stage play which somebody decided to photograph.

Fred Kerr plays Sir Henry, Lord of the Manor. He is of the blustering, blundering type of nincompoop given to blurting out "What the deuce!" "What the devil!" and other expressions indicating a total lack of comprehension. Luckily he has a clever and sympathetic wife - Kate Cutler. There is also a son, the usual gormless affair who is an utter shower - Deering Wells.

After setting all this up, we move on to the plot, which consists of a new law or requirement being effected which means that Sir Henry has to take in three homeless people. He decides to treat them as his guests. The first is an old itinerant drunk - Frank Bertram; his feisty daughter - April Dawn and a plain-speaking Canadian - Henry Wilcoxon. If this wasn't enough for the old boy to put up with, there is the fact that his son is setting himself to marry an atrocious and snobby "Kitty" - Joan Marion and, a family friend staying with them - Betty Stockfeld - has decided to marry the Canadian with her father, a General who has been out in India, due to return at any moment...

I think that a similar sort of household as this has been stock in trade of British films since the year dot - although this must have been one of the first of the talking picture representations of it?

The plot is an impossible bit of nonsense, but it does give the cast an opportunity to milk it for all its worth - not that they overdo any of it, in fact they all do a very good job of putting everything over.

Directed by Henry Edwards and Produced by Herbert Wilcox this is quite an enjoyable relic.
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 5:32 am

Uncle Bob has been telling us all that he is still in his first childhood. Well, the little boy in me comes out quite often, so I too indulge myself in a little bit of youthful exuberance from time to time and let my otherwise good taste (hehehe) go to blazes. Such it was as I sat through "Geostorm" (2017) another in the never ending spate of disaster films that tell us the world is about to end at any tick of the clock.

Did you know that in a few years time there will be shuttles taking off to go into space as frequently as aeroplanes go up today? Obviously there will still be plenty of money coming from somewhere to pay for it all? Also, in a few years time, we will have a layer of satellites up there to keep a watch on the weather, which, as we all know, is becoming more and more eratic. These satellites will be able to fix it up. ---- oh! Bravo! Naturally this system has been invented by the one man - and he is the only one who knows how to work it.

You can guess can't you? The system is controlled by computers, and as we all know, from sitting exasperated in front of them from time to time - things can go wrong!

This is terrible for the world of course, but terrific for the picture, because we get to see lots of destruction. I particularly liked skyscrapers falling over with a domino effect and some people in the 677th floor of that tallest building in the Emirates looking out the window as the structure got the wobbles.

This was all hokum hooked up to C.G.I. with loud sound effects and dramatic music. George Melies would be enthralled at how his early effects have now been embelished.

If this picture bears any resemblence to any other picture, it is merely similarity. Fun at the time and then totally forgetable is how one would sum it up.
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"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 8:34 am

Thanks to his being TCM's Star of the Month, I was able to catch up with some James Stewart titles I'd glossed over in the past. The FBI Story (1959) was every bit the stiff Hoover-endorsed clunker I expected it to be. Stewart and Vera Miles try their best, but it lands with the thud heavier than the sound of a disgraced agent turning in his badge.

Shenandoah (1965) was a marked improvement, probably director Andrew McLaglen's finest film, occasionally overcoming that flat Universal Studios "look" that makes their 1960s and early '70s films so immediately recognizable. Heck, even Doug McClure turns in a good performance, and it's always great to see Strother Martin turn up, here in one scene as an engineer who begs Stewart not to set fire to his train, which was loaded with Confederate prisoners. I thought the battle scenes looked good, and according to IMDb, much of that was borrowed from Raintree Country.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 11:36 am

While on the subject of James Stewart, and having seen HARVEY (see earlier post), we just saw THE GLENN MILLER STORY.
As previously mentioned, I was working at Universal's Oklahoma City exchange when this was released. Up to then, Universal's top grossing picture had been THE EGG AND I. This one easily surpassed it, bookings just wouldn't stop. Even the small Oklahoma and Texas panhandle towns in our territory ate it up.
Watching it today, the reproduction of the Miller music was excellent. I think the original recordings in 1953 were in stereo, and this was reproduced in TCM's showing.
BUT, the clothes, oh my! Everything was 1953, even though the story began about 1930. This was especially evident in June Allyson's clothes and hair. Nothing new, almost all period pictures made at that time had contemporary styles. Never in the picture was there a date mentioned to keep one up with the progression of the story. Cars changed, but unless an expert no way to identify the years. Anytime a newspaper was shown, it had no year in the dateline until 1944, when Miller was lost in a flight from London to Paris.
The picture is a bit long, and sappy in the personal story, but the music makes up for it.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 2:14 pm

I have not been very fond of earlier films by Martin McDonagh, but Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) has Frances McDormand in the lead role as a woman who puts up those three billboards. It's been a good many months since her daughter was raped while dying, then doused with kerosene and set afire, and she puts up those billboards asking sheriff Woody Harrelson why they haven't arrested anyone.

With McDonagh's earlier movies, the performances have been all over the shop, as if some people are playing a scene for comedy and some for tragedy and no one is talking to anyone else. With McDormand at the center, saying what she is saying, the mood shifts in an instant from comedy to Harrelson's coughing his lungs out without anyone missing a beat. It's one of those instants in a movie that tells you that these actors are inhabiting these characters who have known each other for decades and draws me into the moment and the story far more than anything else could.

I don't know if McDonagh has finally learned how to direct his own material; I suspect that he let McDormand have her own head. Several decades ago, her turn in Fargo had me convinced that Ethan Coen came in one day and said "Joel, if you don't let Frances play this scene the way she wants, I'm going to be sleeping on the couch for a long time."
I think she understands these characters and can show them, and McDonagh let her have her head. The proof is on the screen, if you go look at it.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Nov 26, 2017 5:01 pm

"Put that light out!" Yes there's a war on and we get to know who we are fighting for when Vera Lynn leads the stage company in the singing of the National Anthem in the opening scene. An air raid is on and the audience are still in their seats, but never mind, the orchestra conductor says he'll get the orchestra to play a few tunes until the "All Clear" is sounded. The audience remain in their seats which means they are either lunatics or British. In this case it's the latter.

"We'll Meet Again" (1943) takes the popular tune of the times as its title. It's meant as a morale booster for the war effort and manages to do so whilst putting across a few little hints as to how "we should all pull together". By this time, Vera Lynn's voice was well known to British Empire troops fighting in all theatres of the war and she became the Force's sweetheart. It's not too hard to see why.

Thankfully Dame Vera gets to sing quite a lot in this picture although some of the songs are a bit twee - "Be like the Kettle and Sing" but it's that voice which stirs the heart and still makes one feel good listening to it all these years after the picture was made.

Dame Vera is a chorine in a stage show, but she can sing. She has a friend who is a composer (Ronald Ward) - and she helps him get his music broadcast on the Beeb and in so doing becomes a famous singing personality.

One gets the impression that the B.B.C., was basically run by incompetents in that Frederick Leister is an absent-minded head of something or other, a position which means he books acts to go on the air. He is fuelled by cups of tea provided by his, in her own mind, terribly organised secretary (Betty Jardine). The two of them provide many a guffaw.

There's a bit of sentiment, a bit of drama, but overall it is a bright and breezy picture meant to entertain - and that it does in spades.

Also in the cast is Geraldo of Geraldo and his orchestra, playing himself; Patricia Roc amd Donald Gray. It was directed by Philip Brandon.

Happily, Dame Vera, God Bless her, is still with us - going on for 101!
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 6:44 am

Donald Binks wrote:The audience remain in their seats which means they are either lunatics or British.


Mutually exclusive options?

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 6:52 am

Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:The audience remain in their seats which means they are either lunatics or British.


Mutually exclusive options?

Jim


One certainly hopes not.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 7:18 am

Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:The audience remain in their seats which means they are either lunatics or British.


Mutually exclusive options?

Jim


More often, found to be complementary?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 8:50 am

Over the last two nights watched 5 in the series of 39 short "support features" of something called "Scotland Yard", made in Britain between 1953- 1961. These were films that ran from 26-32 minutes in length, and they were shown in between two feature films at a theater (or should that read theatre?). They all had a narrator's voice come on at first (exactly like Walter Winchell used to do in the American TV series "The Untouchables"), then the shows were introduced and periodically interrupted by Edgar Lustgarten, the author/novelist and crime expert. The stories are all based on actual Scotland Yard cases (a few of which I am actually familiar with!), and then several rather well known Brit actors and actresses fill in the parts. Most of the actors and actresses, however, would be totally unknown to most American viewers. A few, like Peter Bowles or John Le Mesurier, or possibly Harry H. Corbett might possibly be familiar.

I watched "The Drayton Case" (1953), "The Missing Man" (1953), "The Candlelight Murder" (1953), "The Blazing Caravan" (1954), and "The Dark Stairway" (1954). All five of these were directed by Ken Hughes, who also wrote the scripts. There were several other directors involved in the continuing series. These are rather rote by nature, but extremely well done nevertheless for their budget. They were all shot at Merton Park Studios and then distributed by Anglo-Amalgamated Pictures. My favorite so far was "The Blazing Caravan". The sheer gall of the individual who murdered the victim was absolutely amazing. The advent took place in 1952, only a year before the episode was made and less than two full years before the episode was shown in theaters, so many in the audiences would have been familiar with the case. All the cases are considered "famous" by Scotland Yard people. One of the interesting aspects, too, has been the forensic capabilities of those times being shown. Even in cases dating back into the thirties the forensics was quite scientific and capable, and its use, at least as shown in the series, penetrating, needed, adroit, and cunning. It's like a fifties version of CSI. The series is available through Network/Studio Canal, and is on 7 DVDs in PAL format.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 10:19 am

Joe E. Brown doesn't seem well remembered now but he was a popular star of the 1930s. There's a Brown formula. He's usually a underdog hick who gets involved in a sport and comes out on top. One of the odder films is 6 Day Bike Rider in which Brown plays Wilfred Simpson from a small town named Mildew. He gets involved by chance in a 6-day bike race and is known as Mildew Simpson and partnered with Frank McHugh. His rival (Gordon Westcott) is married but has been leading Mildew's girlfriend (Maxine Doyle) astray. Anyway they all end up at this race. Lots of rear projection. Lots of sight gags. But the ever-athletic Brown also does quite a lot of cycling around the velodrome. Do these even exist in this country any more?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 12:16 pm

drednm wrote:Joe E. Brown doesn't seem well remembered now but he was a popular star of the 1930s. There's a Brown formula. He's usually a underdog hick who gets involved in a sport and comes out on top. One of the odder films is 6 Day Bike Rider in which Brown plays Wilfred Simpson from a small town named Mildew. He gets involved by chance in a 6-day bike race and is known as Mildew Simpson and partnered with Frank McHugh. His rival (Gordon Westcott) is married but has been leading Mildew's girlfriend (Maxine Doyle) astray. Anyway they all end up at this race. Lots of rear projection. Lots of sight gags. But the ever-athletic Brown also does quite a lot of cycling around the velodrome. Do these even exist in this country any more?


Well, there's the Tour de France, but you have to go overseas for that...

Believe it or not, one of the most popular sports in the 1920s and 30s was marathon walking. Ordinary Joes and Jills (yes, women were active in the sport too) would competitively walk from one city to another, or across a province/state, or even across the country. I reviewed a quite fascinating account of a cross-Canada walk that took place in 1921; you can read it here: http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2011/11 ... ss-canada/

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 12:22 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
drednm wrote:Joe E. Brown doesn't seem well remembered now but he was a popular star of the 1930s. There's a Brown formula. He's usually a underdog hick who gets involved in a sport and comes out on top. One of the odder films is 6 Day Bike Rider in which Brown plays Wilfred Simpson from a small town named Mildew. He gets involved by chance in a 6-day bike race and is known as Mildew Simpson and partnered with Frank McHugh. His rival (Gordon Westcott) is married but has been leading Mildew's girlfriend (Maxine Doyle) astray. Anyway they all end up at this race. Lots of rear projection. Lots of sight gags. But the ever-athletic Brown also does quite a lot of cycling around the velodrome. Do these even exist in this country any more?


Well, there's the Tour de France, but you have to go overseas for that...

Believe it or not, one of the most popular sports in the 1920s and 30s was marathon walking. Ordinary Joes and Jills (yes, women were active in the sport too) would competitively walk from one city to another, or across a province/state, or even across the country. I reviewed a quite fascinating account of a cross-Canada walk that took place in 1921; you can read it here: http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2011/11 ... ss-canada/" target="_blank

Jim


Fascinating article, Jim.

No, Tour de France isn't quite the same thing. These races with specifically on indoor tracks called velodromes, sort of similar to the roller derby tracks but probably pitched more for fast cycling. The Brown film highlights teams whereby you relieve your teammate and he grabs you and whips you past him. Truly bizarre and quite interesting. There's only one other film I can think of that featured this sort of race, the silent Open All Night (1924).
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 1:39 pm

drednm wrote:
Jim Roots wrote:
drednm wrote:Joe E. Brown doesn't seem well remembered now but he was a popular star of the 1930s. There's a Brown formula. He's usually a underdog hick who gets involved in a sport and comes out on top. One of the odder films is 6 Day Bike Rider in which Brown plays Wilfred Simpson from a small town named Mildew. He gets involved by chance in a 6-day bike race and is known as Mildew Simpson and partnered with Frank McHugh. His rival (Gordon Westcott) is married but has been leading Mildew's girlfriend (Maxine Doyle) astray. Anyway they all end up at this race. Lots of rear projection. Lots of sight gags. But the ever-athletic Brown also does quite a lot of cycling around the velodrome. Do these even exist in this country any more?


Well, there's the Tour de France, but you have to go overseas for that...

Believe it or not, one of the most popular sports in the 1920s and 30s was marathon walking. Ordinary Joes and Jills (yes, women were active in the sport too) would competitively walk from one city to another, or across a province/state, or even across the country. I reviewed a quite fascinating account of a cross-Canada walk that took place in 1921; you can read it here: http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2011/11 ... ss-canada/" target="_blank" target="_blank

Jim


Fascinating article, Jim.

No, Tour de France isn't quite the same thing. These races with specifically on indoor tracks called velodromes, sort of similar to the roller derby tracks but probably pitched more for fast cycling. The Brown film highlights teams whereby you relieve your teammate and he grabs you and whips you past him. Truly bizarre and quite interesting. There's only one other film I can think of that featured this sort of race, the silent Open All Night (1924).


Yeah! I've got that Menjou special, too, and found the entire culture around the indoor bike race to be bizarre. It reminds me of the crowds that went to wrestling matches wearing tuxedos in the same era. Looks insane nowadays, but at the same time you feel, "Man, people had style back then!"

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 2:02 pm

Jim Roots wrote: It reminds me of the crowds that went to wrestling matches wearing tuxedos in the same era...
Jim


You mean you don't dress? Oh, Jimmy, and I thought you were a gentleman!

:D
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 2:08 pm

Donald Binks wrote:I hadn't seen Leslie Howard in a picture for ages, so I was happy to put on "Service for Ladies" (1932) (known in America as "Reserved for Ladies".) This was a picture with a lot of Hungarian imput. One of the writers was Lajos Biró who adapted it from a story by Ernest Vajda; the director was (Sir) Alexander Korda and Howard himself, the quintessential Englishman, was born of Hungarian parents. One can therefore feel the Continental touch here and there - especially when the scenes move to a ski lodge up in the alps frequented by Countesses and Kings travelling incognito.

Mr. Howard is a rather impulsive fellow. He picks up some parcels a young lady drops, follows her to her hotel, becoming more and more enamoured of her as the minutes tick by. Then, quite suddenly he leaves his job as a renowned head waiter at a posh restaurant and swans off to the alps chasing the young thing. I suppose all this is quite natural if the seat of affection is Elizabeth Allan....


If anyone out there decides to watch this it would be advisable to check which upload it is. A copy surfaced a few weeks ago which was of rather dubious quality that I put it on the 'for later' list. The more recent upload is in five or six parts and looks a whole lot better.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 2:25 pm

As with Donald Binks, I recently enjoyed the celluloid company of Fred Kerr, who (as James Agate noted) has the ability to play different characters in exactly the same way, or as near exact as to make little difference. Here he graces THE LADY OF SCANDAL / THE HIGH ROAD (1930) in which musical comedy star Ruth Chatterton is dragged by fiance Ralph Forbes (her husband at the time - lucky stiff) to meet his stuffy family who seem to spend most of their time either eating or grousing about their inferiors. Of course the whole outfit is suitably shocked until Chatterton suggests or agrees to stay for a while, where she peps things up considerably! From a play by Frederick Lonsdale, one might expect this film to be rather a bore, but thanks to Chatterton, Basil Rathbone and Kerr, it definitely isn't.

Despite a rather low sound upload, which made the dialogue difficult to follow in spots, this is an entertaining combination of drawing-room comedy and romantic drama, with Rathbone as the cousin with an invalid wife who falls (can't blame him!) for Chatterton. Kerr plays Forbes's henpecked Uncle with his usual relish and makes one wonder why he had to go to America first to appear in talkies. A very English (or British, if you prefer) entertainment from the MGM studio.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 3:42 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
Jim Roots wrote: It reminds me of the crowds that went to wrestling matches wearing tuxedos in the same era...
Jim


You mean you don't dress? Oh, Jimmy, and I thought you were a gentleman!

:D


Well, I still dress for dinner. Lunch and breakfast, too.

My medals are currently at the dry cleaners, though.

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Nov 27, 2017 3:54 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:
Jim Roots wrote: It reminds me of the crowds that went to wrestling matches wearing tuxedos in the same era...
Jim


You mean you don't dress? Oh, Jimmy, and I thought you were a gentleman!

:D


Well, I still dress for dinner. Lunch and breakfast, too.

My medals are currently at the dry cleaners, though.

Jim



I don't believe Binky means Underoos and the the top of your Trapper Pierre PJs.

Bob
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Jim Roots

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Nov 28, 2017 6:34 am

boblipton wrote:
Jim Roots wrote:
Well, I still dress for dinner. Lunch and breakfast, too.

My medals are currently at the dry cleaners, though.

Jim



I don't believe Binky means Underoos and the the top of your Trapper Pierre PJs.

Bob


Bah! Underoos are an Aussie thing, like kangaroos. Nothing but designer silks for the Canadians here, sir.

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Nov 28, 2017 8:15 am

But the ever-athletic Brown also does quite a lot of cycling around the velodrome. Do these even exist in this country any more?


Chicago actually had one for a while recently, though it closed in 2016. Here's a story about it, but it certainly seems to suggest that there just wasn't much interest in going around and around, compared to the traffic on the area's many bike trails.

https://chi.streetsblog.org/2016/07/18/ ... -the-road/
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Nov 28, 2017 8:38 am

Indianapolis built one for outdoor cycling in 1982. It has been used for Olympic events to national cycling events. This is the Wikipedia take on it. Seems fairly accurate:

"The Major Taylor Velodrome is an open-air velodrome in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., named for Marshall Taylor. The 333.34 m (364.55 yd) track with 28 degree banked turns and 9 degree straights. The Velodrome is located immediately north from Marian University campus and is the home track of the Marian University Cycling Team.
The velodrome was opened in July 1982 for the U.S. Olympic Festival.[1] It was built at a cost of 2.5 million dollars.[2] It was a facility required to host that year's National Sports Festival, with money coming from a partnership between the Indianapolis Parks and Recreation Department and the Lilly Endowment. It was the first building built with public money in Indianapolis to be named after an African American. The proposal to name the facility for Taylor came initially from Tom Healy, a writer for the Indianapolis News, who contacted Taylor's daughter, Sidney Taylor Brown. The two advocated among the city's business community and Mayor William H. Hudnut III.[3]
It has played host to many national and international competitions, including the 1987 Pan American Games, USA Cycling's Collegiate Track National Championships in 2003, 2010, 2011, 2014, and 2017, and USA Cycling's Masters Track National Championships in 2005, 2013, and 2016. In May 2011, Marian University took over operation of the Velodrome property, known as the Indy Cycloplex, which includes a BMX track, mountain bike trails, cyclocross course, and public green space.. In the years following the shift of operation, the facility has focused on promoting youth health and fitness as well as well as the continuous development in the sport of competitive cycling. Weekly & daily programming takes place on the Velodrome from April through September, including a Thursday night race series, the Major Taylor Racing League."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Nov 28, 2017 8:46 am

Interesting.... I had forgotten about the Olympics.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Nov 28, 2017 9:31 am

I thought Ivy (1947) was sensational. Directed by Sam Wood and designed by William Cameron Menzies, this is a stylish and engrossing noir drama set in Edwardian England that stars Joan Fontaine as a poisonous beauty who wants more. She's saddled with a dumb cluck of a husband (Richard Ney) who's spent all his inheritance on her. She seems to be dallying with a doctor (Patric Knowles) until she catches sight of a millionaire (Herbert Marshall) whom she befriends at a party. Marshall gets the husband a job but Ivy spends as fast as he can earn. She's also annoyed that the husband and the doctor can't be discarded easily, now that she's set her sights on Marshall. What's a grasping beauty to do? Wood directs with lots of close-ups, and Menzies' set design evokes German Expressionism. They combine for a terrific effect. Fontaine is very excellent as Ivy, and the main male characters are well done. There's also Cedric Hardwicke as an inspector, Lucile Watson as Knowles' mother, Una O'Connor as a fortune teller, Sara Allgood and Rosalind Ivan as housekeepers, Henry Stephenson as the judge, and others.
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