What is the last film you watched? (2017)

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earlytalkiebuffRob

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 2:15 am

CHILD'S PLAY (1952/54) was of interest to me as one of the Group 3 productions headed by John Grierson and John Baxter in the 1950s. Many of these (BRANDY FOR THE PARSON; YOU'RE ONLY YOUNG TWICE; MISS ROBIN HOOD; TIME, GENTLEMEN PLEASE) were in the Ealing tradition of quirky comedies which celebrated aspects of life in the British Isles, with a fair bit of location work. They often features up-and-coming stars and character players as well as acting as a training ground for new directors, although some of them do not wear particularly well.

This particular example is a sort of cross between the 'William' books and films (although the youngsters are not very naughty despite their label of 'The Holy Terrors') and those of the Children's Film Foundation, and is only sporadically entertaining. A village gang accidentally stumble across a radioactive substance (from a bit of Krakatoa!) whilst experimenting with gunpowder and other substances. They then decide to make popcorn with it (don't try this at home), selling it through local shopkeeper Mona Washbourne and delivery man Peter Sallis.

Unfortunately the plot rambles a bit, being told by the tall-story teller of the gang, (Christopher Beeny) to a gaggle of reporters, so we don't know how much of the unlikely yarn is his fertile imagination and how much is really supposed to have happened. Washbourne is good value here, and Sallis gives his usual kindly performance which was keeping him in work sixty years later. There's a brief appearance from Ballard Berkeley for good measure, an not as a Scotland Yard inspector, either, though the police do a fair bit of bumbling...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 7:35 am

At a ski resort in Europe, Jack Hulbert falls down more than a Catskills tumeler on Chanukah. I suppose that's why this one is called Falling for You (1933). It's one of his movie pairings with his wife, Cicely Courtneidge. They're not the romantic couple here. They're competing reporters on a newspaper and they're trying to get a story on Tamara Desni, who is fleeing from her fiance, Archduke Garry Marsh, who keeps trying to kidnap her back to the country where their marriage contract is enforceable. Jack falls in love with her at first sight, and that's where the movie is at its best. The rest consists of a few songs, split between Jack and Miss Courtneidge; Miss Courtneidge putting in Jack's rejected dentures and trying unsuccessfully to pass herself off as someone else; one exuberant dance on a bar; and the usual gag sequences and mugging between the two stars, which must have been audience pleasers when this movie was new. Alas, the shtick hasn't aged well.

It's co-directed by Jack and Robert Stevenson. By the 1970s, Stevenson's movies had earned more money than any other director's.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 8:18 am

And speaking of schtick.... Bachelor Flat (1961) is an inane comedy by the ever-leering Frank Tashlin that gives us a refined British scholar, Terry-Thomas, being pursued by all his buxom students. He has rented a beach house in Santa Monica and has a dopey student, Richard Beymer, living in a trailer in the driveway. Into the house comes a dopey teenager (Tuesday Weld) whose mother owns the house. But because she has run away from school, she pretends to be a delinquent on the lam. There's a lot of questioning about who is sleeping in whose bed in the usual manner of the times. Turns out T-T is engaged to the girl's mother (Celeste Holm), but the mother has never mentioned she has a grown daughter. When mama comes home from wherever she's been, T-T has gotten drunk and turned the tables of the buxom gals by chasing them all over the beach. Funny, no? One of the students is done up a la Monroe and another a la Mansfield.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 8:58 am

A quite obscure British noir, Appointment With Crime (1947) was released in a pristine Criterion version by Olive Films just last year. It stars William Hartnell, who apparently was one of the plethora of actors to essay "Doctor Who" at some point in time, as "Leo Martin", a sap "smash and grab" thief left to take the rap for a botched job by "Loman" and "Hatchett" (played by a couple of Brits of whom I had never heard before). Once he gets out of jail, "Leo" gets his revenge by framing "Loman" for the murder of "Hatchett". This brings him into conflict with the real head of the crime syndicate, "Gregory", played by the only name actor and non-limey in the cast, Herbert Lom, along with his boyfriend/henchman "Neil". Pursuing them is an ostensibly "Canadian" detective, "Rogers". Joyce Howard figures in there as the dime-a-dance dame.

Although Hartnell is singularly unappealing in his monotone of an icy performance, and Raymond Lovell as "Loman" is way too much of a marshmallow to be a convincing crime boss, the film is fairly well-made and is certainly entertaining.

But, wowee, the Brits of 1947 evidently had no idea how to film violence! Every single scene of fights or gunfire is unintentionally hilarious in its obvious ineptitude. Item 1: in a collage early in the film, one of the scenes is a fistfight in which two gangsters, rather than fake punches to the face in the American style, swing open-handed slaps to the back of each other's shoulder. Item 2: "Gregory" stands without any flinching or other natural physical reaction as "Leo" pumps four bullets into him at point-blank range. Item 3: "Neil" stands a couple of feet away from "Leo" and watches him kill his boyfriend without making a move, then kind of collapses into his chair when "Leo" makes an arm gesture in his direction (neither my wife nor I could catch whether "Leo" shot him or punched him). It reminded me of nothing so much as Stan Laurel standing by politely while Jimmy Finlayson rips Ollie Hardy's tie up to his throat, Stanley courteously awaiting his own destruction at Fin's hands. Item 4: In the climactic scene set in a train, almost the closing shot sees "Rogers" stick his head between "Leo's" legs in a somewhat obscene "torture" configuration.

Despite these good laughs, the Anglos managed to capture some of the atmosphere of film noir in this overlooked film

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 9:05 am

I finally caught up with Garbo's unintentional swan song Two-Faced Woman-1941 and wasn't sure what to expect. I have always heard that it was a train wreck and was not expecting much--overall its not THAT bad but one expects more from everyone involved -director George Cukor,Melvyn Douglas,Constance Bennett and Roland Young. Ruth Gordon plays a secretary in a role usually played by the likes of Ruth Hussey -Hussey must have been busy.....Garbo is charming in parts and everyone seems competent but it just doesn't gel and many things seem subpar. I am sure that it sounded better on paper! Costumer Adrian and Sidney G of the hair department should have been shot-their "creations" for the gals are truly hideous!!!! From what I have read this one also had censorship problems. Overall it is just unfortunate.....
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 11:21 am

Finally gave a decades overdue viewing of John Huston's The Man Who Would Be King. I was definitely craving an old fashioned boys own story and it delivered in spades. Of course Sean Connery and Michael Caine were joys to behold but even the story was spot on. My only quibble was with the Kipling framing.

What was most fascinating was the whole Freemason thing. This has got to be one of the only films where Masonry is given such a prominent mention. Curious coincidence or just another layer of the conspiracy? Just asking for a friend, mind you...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Sep 03, 2017 5:17 pm

Today's theater movie with my cousin was Tulip Fever (2017), and it broke the string of poor pictures. This story of lust, adultery and redemption amid the background of Tulipomania has a fine script co-written by Tom Stoppard, a nuanced performance by Christopher Waltz as the cuckolded husband, and a funny turn by Tom Hollander as a randy woman's doctor. My cousin thought it had too many Acts of G*d. I thought it showed that belief and hope of redemption can redeem people. My only objection is that the lighting and artwork shown is slightly out of period. To see how proper use of these subjects can help make a movie, take a look at 2003's Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Then it was off to MOMA for Dragonfly Squadron (1954). I don't remember seeing anything directed by Lesley Selander that wasn't a B western, a genre at which he excelled; his stint at Lassie ended before I think I was aware of such things. Dragonfly Squadron (1954) is a typical Allied Artist programmer, set during the opening of the Korean War, as Major John Hodiak struggles to train Koreans to be fighter pilots in just weeks, while struggling with his image as a coward who abandoned his co-pilot and his forbidden love for Barbara Britton, who is now married to Doctor Bruce Bennett. A very young Chuck Conners shows up as an infantry captain.

It's decent fare with good actors, but Mr. Selander doesn't seem to be able to raise much of a performance in this unpracticed genre. While the visual elements are fine for the situation, it doesn't seem that the 3-D technology adds much to the proceedings. I suspect it is my old-fashioned aesthetics at work, but I believe it would have impressed me about the same in a flat presentation.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 4:58 am

The Alphabet Murders (1965) is a bizarre entry in the Agatha Christie canon. Loosely based on her novel The ABC Murders, the film (directed by Frank Tashlin), casts Tony Randall as Hercule Poirot, complete with bald head and wandering accent and Robert Morley as Hastings, his accidental assistant on a case involving a serial killer in London. Seems more a chance to show swingin' 60s London than anything else, with the mystery plot almost a secondary thought. Tashlin gets his usual quota of busty girls (especially in the gambling club sequence, where every woman is filmed from above as they lean toward the table). Randall seemingly was a replacement for Zero Mostel. Morley is quite good. Cast includes Anita Ekberg, Maurice Denham, Guy Rolfe, Sheila Allen, James Villiers, Richard Wattis, and needless cameos by Margaret Rutherford and Stringer Davis. Oddest sequence may be Poirot bowling.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 10:25 am

Harold Teen (1934) is an odd Warners musical that only comes alive in the finale when Hal LeRoy gets to let loose with some impressive dancing. Otherwise, it's a pretty ordinary small-town story about the silly girl (Rochelle Hudson) who falls for the older man (Douglass Dumbrille) when Harold is right under her nose. Patricia Ellis adds some zip as Mimi and Chick Chandler (29 years old at the time and playing a high-schooler) utters the immortal line, after Rochelle has dropped a bottle of perfume, "P.U. What died?"

I sort of vaguely remember Harold Teen as a comic strip. I've not seen the silent 1928 version with Arthur Lake. The 1934 version looks like it might have been intended as a series. Guy Kibbee, Clara Blandick, Hobart Cavanaugh, Hugh Herbert, Mayo Methot, Charles Brown, Richard Carle, and Eddie Tamblyn co-star. Jane Wyman is an extra as a student.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 11:02 am

Carnival in Costa Rica (1947). With Vera-Ellen, Cesar Romero, Dick Haymes, Celeste Holm, Leonide Massine, Fritz Feld. Directed by Gregory Ratoff. Musical with good performances by all, pleasant if forgettable songs, good writing, and exciting dancing (more on this in a moment). PC warriors will only go pale occasionally during this Hollywood take on Costa Rica and its people; it’s actually pretty respectful, considering its era. The story is the usual romantic mix-up between two couples, caused by parental meddling in the affairs of the heart. The great modern ballet choreographer and dancer Léonide Massine choreographed the dances, which consequently have a heavy (and wonderful!) tinge of the kind of showmanship light modern ballet of the time delighted in, enriching the dancing traditions of musical comedy. Massine himself comes out of a tree (!) to dance in one of the early numbers in the show, and shows his passion, expertise, and knowledge of Spanish dance; those familiar with his choreography will see his “personality” in the other dances in the show. The photography is always good and sometimes creative. The color is eye-popping. The show’s 97 minutes pass without tedium or longueurs. I had expected a musty by-the-numbers film musical, but this one has some life in it. Worth a look.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 4:39 pm

When Frank Wilcox, publisher of Skagway's only newspaper, has his warehouse burned, he sends word that he won't be able to bring his family up. Worried about him, Those Redheads from Seattle (1953-- mother Agnes Moore and her daughters, Rhonda Fleming Teresa Brewer and the Bell Sisters (one of whom is a despicable blonde) -- show up anyway, to discover that daddy has been shot by John Kellogg, presumably under the orders of kindly dance hall proprietor Gene Barry.

The movie is an ambitious one for the Dollar Bills: their first musical and their first 3-D picture. It's a bit abbreviated in character motivations, but the music is well performed, mostly by Miss Brewer and Guy Mitchell, with some great choreography by Jack Baker, and the 3-D is well used, with lots of things tossed at the camera, and some lovely outdoor cinematography.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 5:06 pm

I watched two modern day pictures in the last couple of days - "The Shadow Effect" and "What Happened to Monday", both (2017). Now, as well as the old pictures I like to occasionally dip my toe into what's happening currently. Usually I am disappointed and go immediately back to a "good old picture". This state of affairs was occasioned looking at these two offerings. I thought that I might have been rewarded with a good science fiction story, but alas, no. It seems to me that there is a strong penchant to turn everything into some kind of "action movie". An excuse for a series of explosions, or people running around with weaponry shooting everyone else? What's next? Is "Wind in the Willows" to be given the same treatment?

The other problem I have is with script-writers who never seem to get past the letter "f" in the dictionary. Wordage now includes more "f---'s" than there are "and's" or "the's". It is so banal and crude.

To make matters worse, Carruthers had just placed afternoon tea in front of me at a time when I was entreated to seeing the hero in one of these pictures barfing in a toilet bowl. Are these scenes absolutely necessary?

Am I alone in these thoughts?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 7:07 pm

Hacksaw Ridge(2016) dir.Mel Gibson..great squib work. :)
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Sep 04, 2017 7:39 pm

George O'Brien swaps his usual cowboy gear for a coonskin cap to play Daniel Boone (1936). It's an "eastern western", as he leads a wagon train over the Appalachian Mountains to found a settlement in Kentucky. In the course of the movie, he must court Heather Angel, deal with vengeful and effete Ralph Forbes, escape from Indians who want to burn him alive, under the command of renegade John Carradine, and an attack of the settlement.

It's a well done B under the direction of David Howard, with some lovely compositions by cinematographer Frank Good. In story terms, it hearkens back to Last of the Mohicans, with a faithful, if brutal Indian companion, played by George Regas. Modern viewers may be upset by scene-stealing Clarence Muse, playing a slave; he does so with enormous dignity. For fans of Mr. O'Brien, it will be a delight.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Sep 05, 2017 6:59 am

"Witness to Murder" (1954) stars Barbara Stanwyck, George Sanders, and Gary Merrill. Also in the picture are the likes of Jesse White, Juanita Moore, Claude Akins, even Burt Mustin as night watchman. You see the murder in the first scene. You know who's guilty. BUT...what you don't realize is that the murderer, when he finds out who called the police, is going to be like white on rice - and also claim he didn't do it, and nearly get away. In the meantime Stanwyck's been accused of being incorrect, silly, much, much mistaken, possibly crazy, literally insane, just plain ol' loony tunes, and... It takes until the very last very suspenseful scene to clear this one up. I was really pleased by this entry. I'd never seen it before. Stanwyck's my favorite actress, and now I have 55 of her films in my collection. There just isn't a bad one in the bunch. Oh, there may be bad films she's in, but she's never, ever not worth watching. Never.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Sep 05, 2017 10:06 am

R Michael Pyle wrote:Oh, there may be bad films she's in, but she's never, ever not worth watching. Never.


I watched the entire day of Stanwyck films on TCM recently, and thought exactly the same thing. She's always, always compelling, even if the movie is a clunker.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Sep 05, 2017 10:16 am

The Maltese Falcon (1941). As I mentioned before at some point, I'm most likely the only person here who--up until last night--hadn't seen the Bogart Maltese Falcon (mentioned in the context of indeed seeing the 1931 Cortez Maltese Falcon). No need to be tedious here: Now having seen them both, in every jot and tittle I strongly prefer the Cortez version, the only exception being that, admittedly and obviously, the filming/technical aspects are better in the later film. Yes, Bogart is by far the better actor; but that in itself spoils it. Cortez, whether he intended it or not, is intriguingly chilling, even creepy, in his take on the role; Bogart is too human. Small enriching details of the earlier movie are sanitized/Puritanized in the later one. The Bogart version is homogeneous, smooth, and self-conscious; the Cortez version is edgy, unthinking, dark. The Bogart version has human archetypes with depth, which is somehow comforting; the Cortez version has shallow human flotsam, which is somehow disturbing. I'll watch the 1931 version again, and doubtless yet again. 1941, no, once was enough.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Sep 05, 2017 4:30 pm

The Egg and I meets the Atomic Age in Mr. Drake's Duck (1951). Douglas Fairbanks Jr. takes his new bride, ditzy Yolande Donlan, to his decrepit farm. When Ms. Donlan purchases six dozen ducks by accident, they soon discover one lays eggs with uranium in the shell. Within short order they are occupied by the Army, the Navy and the R.A.F., who want the duck and its ability to separate out the element for national service.

It's an exceedingly silly comedy, written and directed by Miss Donlan's husband, Val Guest, with plenty of fine comedy players in the cast: Jon Pertwee as their rustic farmhand, Reuben; Peter Butterworth as the handyman who feuds constantly with Mr. Pertwee; Wilfred Hyde-White, A.E. Matthews and Reginald Beckwith are on hand for the fun. It's not a great comedy, by any means, but it proceeds at such a hectic pace -- Mr. Guest had gotten his training as a writer for Walter Forde and Marcel Varnel -- that the time flew happily by.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Sep 05, 2017 7:39 pm

Three notable things about the fast-paced It's a Bet (1935) include a lively performance by Gene Gerrard as a man who makes a bet he can vanish for a month and that even with blazing headlines, no one will catch him; the beautiful location shooting in various spots of rural English; and the penultimate film performance of Helen Chandler. Despite the far-fetched plot, the story zips along as Gerrard, as Rollo Briggs, has to use his wits to deal with his changing situations and the assortment of people he meets along the way. The merry-go-round scene must have made an impression on Alfred Hitchcock.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Sep 06, 2017 10:18 am

In Park Avenue Logger (1937) George O'Brien is a masked wrestler -- he thinks his father will be ashamed that he isn't using the family fortune to become an intellectual. Daddy Lloyd Ingraham thinks George is effete, so he sends him up to the logging camp to toughen him up. Along the way, there's pretty Beatrice Roberts about whom he can fight with Ward Bond

Although this movie has a screwball comedy start, it quickly turns into a romantic comedy with logging sequences and fights. O'Brien is good in his role, and he only gets to hit Ward Bond, and that only once -- he is a gentleman, after all. Still, it's competently directed by Dave Howard, and the script, while no world-beater, holds together well enough to make this a good, if unexceptional movie for O'Brien fans.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Sep 06, 2017 11:02 am

New Faces of 1937 is a hoot and a half. It gives us Milton Berle in his first talkie feature film. He's young (29 or so) and brash and funny. Harriet Nelson also gives a breezy performance and sings several songs. The nominal star is Joe Penner but he seems to take a backseat to Berle. There's also Harry Parke aka Parkyakarkus. He and Penner are funny together. Several other players don't make much of an impression ... William Brady? 14-year-old Ann Miller gets a tap solo in her first big showcase. Possibly the highlight of the film is the closing number in which Nelson leads the company in peckin'. The peckin' wedding is totally outrageous.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Sep 06, 2017 12:30 pm

boblipton wrote:Daddy Lloyd Ingraham thinks George is effete


We should pause here and allow the ladies to splutter indignantly at the very notion that George O'Brien could possibly be effete.

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Sep 06, 2017 1:54 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
boblipton wrote:Daddy Lloyd Ingraham thinks George is effete


We should pause here and allow the ladies to splutter indignantly at the very notion that George O'Brien could possibly be effete.

Jim


I've wondered why the very brief period of O'Brien's career in which he made this film hasn't earned more scrutiny. He'd just busted up with Twentieth Century-Fox over a pay dispute and signed an exclusive contract with a short lived independent firm, Condor Pictures. His three Condor releases - Hollywood Cowboy, Park Avenue Logger and Windjammer, all distributed and co-funded by RKO - seem a clear attempt to move himself off the Western treadmill and into more diverse roles.

Unfortunately for him, Condor had collapsed towards the end of 1937, RKO bought up his contract, and it was back to standard Westerns. Incidentally, the head of Condor was George Hirliman, probably best known today as the producer of Reefer Madness.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Sep 06, 2017 6:09 pm

George O'Brien wants to sell the ranch he's just inherited, but the lawyer tells him that he can't get a good price for it. Five thousand head of cattle have disappeared. When he goes to the ranch to make enquiries, everyone assumes he's another saddle tramp who has fallen in love at first sight with the manager's daughter, Irene Hervey, so they give him a job and make fun of him.

The Dude Ranger (1934) is a B western with a standard plot, but it is something special. Under the direction of comedy specialist Eddie Cline, the performers get to act with great charm, and the tricks that are played on O'Brien are deadly -- and funny. Sid Saylor plays the comic sidekick, but he's not simply another clown, but a smart, tough cowboy with a strong goofy streak. There is plenty of good location shooting, with a beautiful long shot for the final confrontation. For a B western, this is as good as it gets.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 6:52 am

I guess Tony Hancock was a big star in England in the 1950s and 60s though not a name I was really familiar with. I came across The Punch and Judy Man (1963) in which he stars as a loser who runs a Punch and Judy show at a third rate seaside resort town called Piltdown (it was filmed in Bognor Regis). His wife (Sylvia Syms) runs a knick knack shop. They are not terribly happy. He goes about his day putting on shows and passing the hay for donations. She scours the newspapers for gossip of celebrities and is especially taken with one Lady Jane Caterham (Barbara Murray). Thins change big time when Lady Jane is announced as the special guest as the town's big do for its 60th anniversary. There's to be a special light show that Lady Jane will initiate by turning on a switch. There's also a fancy function that Syms gets invited to by the town's mayoress. Hancock is tapped to put on a puppet show as a tribute to the beach-side merchants. Of course it all goes wrong. The underlying sadness of the film and the plight of the couple only highlights the bits of comedy. It's an odd match-up, but it works.

There's a remarkable scene where Hancock befriends a lonely boy on a rainy day and treats him to a lunch. The shoppe only serves ice cream but it's raining like hell so they stay and have the "Piltdown Glory," a towering glassful of ice cream and gooey glop topped off with a cheery. The soda jerk glowers and seems to dare him to eat it. The kid digs in with Hancock following the kid's lead in devouring the sugar bomb. The scene is done as pantomime. There's something of an Ernie Kovacs skit about it all.

The three stars are excellent. There's also John Le Mesurier as a sand artist, Mario Fabrizi as a photographer, Ronald Fraser as the mayor, and Brian Bedford as Lady Jane's escort.
Last edited by drednm on Thu Sep 07, 2017 8:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 7:04 am

drednm wrote:I guess Tony Hancock was a big star in England in the 1950s and 60s though not a name I was really familiar with.


He started off on the wireless as a virtual failure of a man living in East Cheam. His "off-sider" was Sid James. Then he moved over to TV with the same character. In the '60's he went solo and apart from a few good TV episodes in the beginning, he just went downhill really. His other film that I can remember apart from "The Punch and Judy Man" was the "Rebel" where he played a conceited but awful artist.

I saw him on the stage here in Oz in the late '60's. His career had by that time been virtually shot to pieces. He came on drunk and got a bad write-up. Sadly he committed suicide shortly thereafter.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 8:07 am

Donald Binks wrote:
drednm wrote:I guess Tony Hancock was a big star in England in the 1950s and 60s though not a name I was really familiar with.


He started off on the wireless as a virtual failure of a man living in East Cheam. His "off-sider" was Sid James. Then he moved over to TV with the same character. In the '60's he went solo and apart from a few good TV episodes in the beginning, he just went downhill really. His other film that I can remember apart from "The Punch and Judy Man" was the "Rebel" where he played a conceited but awful artist.

I saw him on the stage here in Oz in the late '60's. His career had by that time been virtually shot to pieces. He came on drunk and got a bad write-up. Sadly he committed suicide shortly thereafter.


Thanks for the extra info.....
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 9:58 am

There's a TV movie about him with a remarkable lookalike performance by Alfred Molina. Does require some familiarity with the original, though, I think.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 10:15 am

Yes. I skipped thru it. The ice cream scene is replicated.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Sep 07, 2017 12:32 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
drednm wrote:I guess Tony Hancock was a big star in England in the 1950s and 60s though not a name I was really familiar with.


He started off on the wireless as a virtual failure of a man living in East Cheam. His "off-sider" was Sid James. Then he moved over to TV with the same character. In the '60's he went solo and apart from a few good TV episodes in the beginning, he just went downhill really. His other film that I can remember apart from "The Punch and Judy Man" was the "Rebel" where he played a conceited but awful artist.

I saw him on the stage here in Oz in the late '60's. His career had by that time been virtually shot to pieces. He came on drunk and got a bad write-up. Sadly he committed suicide shortly thereafter.


My ex-brother-in-law, born in England, was a huge fan of Hancock and somehow found a few of his TV shows on tape back in the 1980s, by which I mean Beta tapes. It was a peculiarly English type of humour which, in Tony's case, did not travel well at all. (I was enamoured of Monty Python, Benny Hill, Morecambe and Wise, and many other British comedians of that era, so the fact Hancock fell flat on a receptive audience seems to speak volumes about him.)
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