What is the last film you watched? (2017)

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greta de groat

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Aug 10, 2017 2:15 pm

wingate wrote:He Knew Women 1930.Stage bound frame with Lowell Sherman in a very fetching dressing gown and a great art deco set.


Alice Joyce's last film. Somehow she and Sherman reminded me of Groucho and Margaret Dumont.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Aug 10, 2017 4:56 pm

Hoot Gibson and John Elliott want to buy the Sunset Range (1935) ranch, and are disappointed when they find out it's been sold to an Easterner. Hoot is even more disappointed when the new owner turns out to be Mary Doran, who wants him to dress like a movie cowboy, but some loaded dice settle that matter, and the good humor of both is on the point of settling any rifts. However, it turns out that Miss Doran's brother has been dealing with some bank robbers, who have put stolen bonds in her luggage. When they show up, shoot the brother and kidnap the girl, it's up to Hoot and the ranch hands to settle the matter.

This is a fine Hoot Gibson movie, directed by Leo MacCarey's under-rated brother, Ray. It shows off Hoot's sly good humor, and AD George Sherman, a couple of years before he began to take the director's chair, directs the action and stunt sequences very well.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Aug 10, 2017 7:31 pm

An American Romance (1944) is on YT. I'd never seen it before. Choppy 2-hour version of the original 150-minute film Mayer ordered trimmed. King Vidor never worked for MGM again after they butchered his 3-year project he wrote, produced and directed. He was originally promised Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman, and Joseph Cotten and got Brian Donlevy, Ann Richards, and Walter Abel. Vidor rightly groused that MGM cut out the human interest story and left the documentary stuff, making for an interesting film, but one that leaves you rather cold. Donlevy is quite good, but Richards is terrible and woefully miscast. I still can't figure out what accent she was trying for. Abel is solid in his usual second-lead role. The only other significant roles go to John Qualen as a cousin and Stephen McNally as the grown-up son. Vidor seems to have been trying for an epic in the story of an immigrant who, through hard work, achieves the American dream of success. Much of the film's ending is set against WW II and the film takes on a propaganda look and feel, especially in the airplane assembly sequence (which is oddly speeded up). Also working against the film is the consistent use of cheesy sets and backgrounds. To be fair, it might have made a different impact with its footage reinstated. I wonder if the footage even still exists?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Aug 11, 2017 9:12 am

Watched "The Lady in Scarlet" (1935) with Reginald Denny, Patricia Farr, Jameson Thomas, Dorothy Revier, James Bush, Claudia Dell, John St. Polis, and others. This was my second outing with this one, and it's still a cheapie that shows in many ways, yet is still a good film. It needed some second takes by a better director (Charles Lamont, who was usually pretty good with little cheap "B" films); some of the acting is atrocious; Reginald Denny needed to be roped-in a few times; some polish should have been added in other ways that I'll leave alone. Still, an interesting plot that begins with the murder of an art collector and dealer whose daughter wants to marry a man the collector/dealer has no use for. As a result, the collector/dealer is about to change his will to leave the daughter out of it to prove a point. He's murdered before he can sign the will. Another murder happens later that is sort of a surprise. There are red herrings throughout, and so the plot thickens throughout rather well, and the ending is not necessarily expected. Meanwhile, Reginald Denny has a relationship with Patricia Farr, who is his second-self in many ways, but professionally evidently his secretary. The relationship is seemingly modeled on Nick and Nora Charles, though not nearly as good. Patricia Farr is wonderful, best thing in the film. Reginald Denny is actually mean, though, in his relationship with Farr, though the gist is, it's supposed to be funny. Mean in a funny sort of way. Yeah, really? Anyway, it plays well because of the actors, but the idea is not funny. The worst part of it all, though, is that there are several - way more than necessary - added bits that look as if they are a major part of the plot that lead to no-where at all. A dagger through a hand, for example. Anyway, watch the movie and enjoy it for the 65 minutes it lasts, and think, "This is 1936 television, not film, because it was made in twice 65 minutes on a budget that barely existed. Still fun. Oh, and by the way, the title has absolutely NOTHING to do with the plot!! It's a title of play that someone in the film had once participated in. And that has NOTHING to do, at all, with the plot! How's that for a trope, so to speak, that was overused in the past (ala another thread)?!
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Aug 11, 2017 2:23 pm

The Rascals again in THE FIRST SEVEN YEARS (1929), with Jackie falling in love (and being scorned by) with May Ann, and getting challenged to a duel. Enough violence in this one to make Peckinpah throw in the towel, and with a pugnacious granny thrown in for good measure.

RAILROADIN' (1929) has a rather hard to hear soundtrack*, but more than compensated by some spectacular train footage and stunts, some of which would have the Health and Safety folk up in arms, with the Gang let loose amongst the locos and sidings with surprising lack of supervision. Plotwise, a bit ramshackle and rambling, but certainly quite amusing and hair-raising at times.

*explains why I didn't realise it was a dream!
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Aug 11, 2017 2:56 pm

The Restless Years (1958) is one of those Universal soapers concerned with people agonizing over the minutiae of happiness in small towns that were usually directed by Dieterle. I went in, as I also do, hopefully, yet with the reservations that I don't like this sort of movie; I'm a big city Jew, so looking at a town with no sign of Blacks, Jews, or Puerto Ricans makes me feel like I am watching something so meaningless and artificial as to be ridiculous. Certainly, casting people in their mid-20s as high school students doesn't help.

Of course, that seems to have been the subtextual meaning of most of these works: don't worry, be happy, no matter who gets hurt along the way. Likewise, the staginess of many of the line readings, seems to indicate that people are thinking about what they are about to say. It just makes it sound falser to me, causing me to wonder why they chose someone like Helmut Kautner, who seems to have had no ear for the cadences of American English, to direct.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Aug 11, 2017 4:50 pm

Lawrence Tibbett, apart from being one of the finest baritones of the 20th Century was not too bad at doing the acting business and had a bit of the matinee idol appearance about him as well, which no doubt helped put across his screen presence. I have seen him in "New Moon" which was more of the conventional transfer of an operetta to film, but I had no idea what to make of "The Cuban Love Song" (1931) where he is teamed up with the "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez who comes across as a woman one would not want to be in the company of for long periods of time. There is a limit after all to how long one can stand a long tirade in excitable Spanish complete with assorted gestures.

The main problem I had with the film is that it seemed aimless and directionless with a lot of it completely unexplained. I know that operetta type fillums are generally ludicrous when it comes to plots - but in this picture we have at one stage, Mr. Tibbett ambling along the docks of New York, finding out a ship is going to Havana, and then going aboard in Dinner suit - with the next scene showing him arriving in said port in tropical whites? Did he have his luggage delivered by aeroplane?

Jimmy Durante and Ernest Torrence also appear - but are given so little to do they must have photographed all of their scenes before breakfast on a Friday morning.

Mr. Tibbett is in the Marines at the start of the film. It's 1917 and he is engaged to his fiancee in New York. We start off in San Francisco and then sail to Havana pre-Castro with his mates Durante and Torrence.Everyone is still able to have fun in Cuba in those days. He falls in love with the said excitable woman and sings a few songs here and there. Then America enters the war and he must sail away and leave her. OK, fairly alright to here, but then we go forward ten years and he has married his fiance. One night they go to a nightclub and he hears a song that brings back memories of Cuba - so he walks out and leave his wife stranded - going back to Havana. He can't get hold of the lost love - but finds her son whom we are meant to surmise is actually his son as well. He goes back to his wife and the silly girl accepts him back with the extra baggage. End.

If Mr. Tibbett's singing voice could not be heard in this film I would have cast it completely in the tripe department.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Aug 11, 2017 6:08 pm

The Office Girl (1931; also known as Sunshine Susie) was the English-language version of Die Privatsekretärin . The German language version was directed by Wilhelm Thiele, a talented director of light fluff. Since the German version is unavailable to me, I can't tell how much of the inventive montage work is due to Victor Saville, the director of the English version.

I've checked the cast list of both, and the only talent, beyond the original Viennese operetta, is star Renate Müller, who leaves Germany to go to Vienna for work. She joins the typing pool of a bank, where manager Morris Harvey rips up her day's work and tells her she will have to stay late because she refuses to go out with him. Bank director Owen Nares sees her as he is leaving for the day and, without saying who he is, takes her out for a night on the town.

The prince-in-disguise-courts-poor-girl plot is still with us -- what else is You've Got Mail (1998)? -- but the time for Viennese operetta has long passed. Still, if you have a taste for the form, you'll take some pleasure in this early talkie version. Jack Hulbert, as a porter, is the lead comic, albeit in heavy make-up. He does a couple of eccentric dances and sings a funny song. Owen Nares, near the end of his matinee-idol phase, serves very well to support the leading lady, and there are a couple of imaginatively staged chorus numbers. I enjoyed myself very much.
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Aug 13, 2017 12:25 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 1:50 am

Boblipton rightly points out the upload of the rarely seen SUNSHINE SUSIE (1931), which was rather frustrating as I saw it a couple of months back in a rather poor upload / copy. This looks and sounds much better from the brief sampling I took of it.

I did grab the opportunity to watch PASTOR HALL (1940), which, despite some artificial-looking sets and a small amount of over-emphasis at times is an absorbing, powerful movie, with Wilfrid Lawson giving of his best. The English accents were not a problem for me (see ALL QUIET for a comparison), partly because they provided the essential contrast between the villagers and the Nazis. Whether by intention or not, it does bring up the question of how right the parson was to be so unbending, knowing he would either be incarcerated or killed for his actions against the government. Why it is not more widely available is a mystery and a shame, especially as the Boultings' related THUNDER ROCK (1942) was issued several years ago.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 6:03 am

Watched "Last of the Warrens" (1936) with Bob Steele, Margaret Marquis, Charles King, Horace Murphy, Lafe McKee, Charles K. French, Blackie Whiteford, and others. Though certainly not a great film, this is fun nevertheless. There are parts that are different, some quite exciting, lots of stock footage, a plot that is both crazy-original and banal at the same time, and, as usual for a fairly early Steele "B" western, good stunt work. You can't get a better stock western baddie than Charles King. Here he's up to his worst, everything from trying to take Steele's girl and marry her, steal his father's cattle and bankrupt him so he can take over his ranch - all this while Bob's gone off to WWI - hide all of Steele's letters to his family and his girl friend, too, etc., etc., etc.... Horace Murphy is the plot's banality. He's supposedly humorous, but he's overbearing, to say the least. And that awful mustache!! Lafe McKee's the sheriff. But the surprise. A face like a roadway that got run over by too many tanks, scars and all: Blackie Whiteford. He makes the plot tick well. Although there are loopholes a-plenty, this one buzzes because of some strong characterization and fascinating plot lines. One of them has Charles K. French, playing Steele's father, come back from the dead during the night and try to haunt his 'killer', Charles King, just before the sheriff and Bob Steele take away a gun full of blanks trying to kill the ghost!! Good scene. Good movie. Recommended for Steele fans. Fans of "B" westerns in general will find this one has a lot going for it. It's NOT like all the others, although there are some tropes in it that make it try to be at times. Oh, well, the outcome of being made by Supreme Pictures, one of Poverty Row's lowest. At least it was directed by Robert N. Bradbury, Sr., Bob Steele's father. They did well together.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 4:52 pm

My bridge partner is away for the summer, and this weekend, my cousin is in Atlanta to attend a party to celebrate Hillary Clinton's victory in last November's election. So, given the paucity of interesting, human stories in the theaters, I.....

Hmm? Yes, Clinton victory. Yes, it was scheduled before the election. Yes, as my cousin has said to me, some people have a hard time accepting reality. Why do you ask? Anyway, it was an opportunity to look at some Asian pictures, not of the Great Movies variety, but more middle-of-the-road production. The Asian dialects of cinema are still somewhat novel to me, and therefore more interesting than American productions of the same sort, if there are any during the Summer Blockbuster season.


The first I saw was A Taxi Driver (2017). Kang-ho Song is a widowed driver with a young daughter, just scraping by. When an opportunity comes up to drive a foreign reporter to a small city under martial law for 100,000 won, he takes it. On the way, he discovers that South Korea is a dictatorship that people are being killed for no good reason, and that ordinary people have standards of ethical behavior, even taxi drivers.

It's a beautifully made combination of staged and stock footage. Thomas Kretschmann, playing the German reporter, looks a lot like the man his character is based on, although handsomer in a Liam-Neeson way. The way it portrays ordinary people rising to the moment is well done. If, like many a South Korean movie I have seen, it seems more violent than other national cinemas, then perhaps that is a salient feature of the national industry.

Having had to use some poorly maintained outhouses at the height of summer and in the depths of winter, I believe that indoor plumbing is the greatest invention of mankind. As a result, I was onboard from the start of Toilet - Ek Prem Katha (2017). Akshay Kumar and Bhumi Pednekar fall in love at first sight -- although it takes her a while to realize it.This is always a convenience, since it allows the film makers to get to the heart of the plot. Miss Pednekar has been raised with the modern conveniences, including a toilet at home, while Mr. Kumar is the son of a very conservative Brahmin in a small village, and since daddy believes that men should pee and defecate wherever they are, while women should hold it in all day and go en masse to a distant field for their business, well, Mr. Kumar believes in quick and dirty solutions to his father's dictatorial edicts.

The movie turns into a propaganda piece on modern sanitation, but never loses sight of its romantic comedy roots. The leads grow as the movie progresses and even the inevitable musical interludes work; indeed, the final one, in which Mr. Kumar admits his faults, is beautifully staged. I can't say how well anyone else will react to this movie, but I enjoyed it immensely.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 4:58 pm

boblipton wrote:Having had to use some poorly maintained outhouses at the height of summer and in the depths of winter, I believe that indoor plumbing is the greatest invention of mankind. As a result, I was onboard from the start of Toilet - Ek Prem Katha. Akshay Kumar and Bhumi Pednekar fall in love at first sight -- although it takes her a while to realize it.This is always a convenience, since it allows the film makers to get to the heart of the plot. Miss Pednekar has been raised with the modern conveniences, including a toilet at home, while Mr. Kumar is the son of a very conservative Brahmin in a small village, and since daddy believes that men should pee and defecate wherever they are, while women should hold it in all day and go en masse to a distant field for their business, well, Mr. Kumar believes in quick and dirty solutions to his father's dictatorial edicts.

The movie turns into a propaganda piece on modern sanitation, but never loses sites of its romantic comedy roots. The leads grow as the movie progresses and even the inevitable musical interludes work; indeed, the final one, in which Mr. Kumar admits his faults, is beautifully staged. I can't say how well anyone else will react to this movie, but I enjoyed it immensely.

Bob


Musical interludes about toilets?

Jim,
who spent his summers in the bedroom next to the world's only indoor outhouse.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 6:11 pm

Meanwhile, back with my Louis de Funès films, I find myself now somewhat half-way through them all as I put on "Taxi Roulotte et Corrida" (1958) ("Taxi, Trailer and Corrida"). This time Louis is going on holiday in August with his family which includes his sister and brother-in-law. he is a taxi-driver and one of the first scenes in the picture shows him in that role which was very reminiscent to me of a drive in to town from Orly airport I had with a taxi-driver who had obtained his licence by driving around in dodgem-cars. I turned white at the memory.

Loaded up with a roof rack full of luggage and towing a two-wheeled caravan they are off. Louis' son befriends a luscious blonde in an American convertible and Louis of course then takes over to escort her through customs at the border - for all are going on to Seville in Spain. But, and this is where it really starts - the blonde is a crook and she is trying to get a stolen diamond across to her bosses. She hides it in Louis' jacket pocket.

The hilarity ensues with a number of chases - the blonde and her bosses all trying to get the diamond back. One of the chases occurs at a nightclub - which gets demolished in the process after Louis performs a bit of Flamenco (he was born Spanish).

Louis hasn't come to his forefront in this - after all, it's an early work - but, it has it's moments. Raymond Bussières is good as the brother-in-law acting as a foil to Louis' usual parade of fuming. Véra Valmont does her interpretation of a French Marilyn Monroe and Jacques Dynam looks ever so much a typical gangster as the crime boss.

The print I looked at had peculiar sound. It had a sort of staccato effect and then later on the dialogue was preceding the action - still, I managed to get through it. Must have been a faulty DVD?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 6:19 pm

Robert Redford must still be in pictures to see if he can eventually get the gong for being the oldest actor to appear in films - but you would think that at his age he could afford to be a little more discerning with the material he must be continually offered. "The Discovery" (2017) with it's premise that Redford has found out proof of an after-life going on when we cark it, is really something that could have been made much more of than what we are given.

The people who play with Redford are probably just out of drama school and are not altogether au-fait with what acting really means - this is particularly so with the male lead who utterly fails to convince or leave an impression.

The story is a bit of a jumble and one probably has to have a team of analysts on call to explain things whilst watching. In the main though, it's all a bit of a bore.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Aug 12, 2017 7:34 pm

boblipton wrote:The Office Girl (1931; also known as Sunshine Susie) was the English-language version of Die Privatsekretärin . The German language version was directed by Wilhelm Thiele, a talented director of light fluff. Since the German version is unavailable to me, I can't tell how much of the inventive montage work is due to Victor Saville, the director of the English version.

I've checked the cast list of both, and the only talent, beyond the original Viennese operetta, is star Renate Müller, who leaves Germany to go to Vienna for work. She joins the typing pool of a bank, where manager Morris Harvey rips up her day's work and tells her she will have to stay late because she refuses to go out with him. Bank director Owen Nares sees her as she is leaving for the day and, without saying who he is, takes her out for a night on the town.

The prince-in-disguise-courts-poor-girl plot is still with us -- what else is You've Got Mail (1998)? -- but the time for Viennese operetta has long passed. Still, if you have a taste for the form, you'll take some pleasure in this early talkie version. Jack Hulbert, as a porter, is the lead comic, albeit in heavy make-up. He does a couple of eccentric dances and sings a funny song. Owen Nares, near the end of his matinee-idol phase, serves very well to support the leading lady, and there are a couple of imaginatively staged chorus numbers. I enjoyed myself very much.


Interesting little film. I thought the music was a little thin but I liked Renate Müller and Owen Nares. I didn't even recognize Jack Hulbert for a while. The typewriter bit was very good. Renate Müller was also the star of Viktor und Viktoria, which of course was remade by both Jessie Matthews and Julie Andrews. I have a copy but have never watched it. Rather shocking to read about Müller's death in 1937. Don't think I've ever heard this story before.

Wikipedia has a link to newspaper stories that Sunshine Susie was named most popular film in UK in 1931.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 7:00 am

Donald Binks wrote:The print I looked at had peculiar sound. It had a sort of staccato effect and then later on the dialogue was preceding the action - still, I managed to get through it. Must have been a faulty DVD?


You're watching all these Louis de Funes films on DVD? Where did you get them?

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 7:03 am

Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:The print I looked at had peculiar sound. It had a sort of staccato effect and then later on the dialogue was preceding the action - still, I managed to get through it. Must have been a faulty DVD?


You're watching all these Louis de Funes films on DVD? Where did you get them?

Jim


From a friend in France.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 7:29 am

I watched "The Mandarin Mystery" (1936) with Eddie Quillan, Charlotte Henry, Rita LaRoy, Wade Boteler, Franklin Pangborn, and others. Let me begin by saying my wife enjoyed it; I thought it was okay to watch during dinner, but I'd never recommend it. It's an Ellery Queen mystery, and it should have been made as such. Instead, Quillan plays Queen as if he's a stand-up comic detective. He's not bad, but it's just not Ellery Queen, and the show suffered for it. Throw in Franklin Pangborn as comic relief and you've got enough ridiculousness to choke a water buffalo. Then there's Charlotte Henry. Is she serious or comic? - even she doesn't know, and that's a serious drawback. Then there's Rita LaRoy, who's so serious that her personality conflicts with all the others. Wade Boteler plays Ellery's father, the police head, and he plays him straight down the line like a pro, and he's the only person in the show I'd follow down the line, too. The plot is good: a stamp worth a fortune, the only one of its kind in the world, is to be sold by Henry, but then it goes missing; is found, but not without a murder happening; gets stolen again; another murder occurs; etc., etc., etc. As I said, I cared and I still do, but read the book and leave this antique, not necessarily well made creaker alone. Ralph Staub directed for Republic Pictures, if anyone cares.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 11:36 am

Lady MacBeth (2016):I was too bored by this to tell you why, but I urge you not to see it. If you find yourself seeing it and don't walk out, well, I made that mistake. If you actually enjoy it, please,preface all future recommendations here by noting you liked it, so I can ignore your opinion, because at least one of us is crazy.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Aug 13, 2017 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 11:55 am

boblipton wrote:Lady MacBeth (2016):I was too bored by this to tell you why, but I urge you not to see it. If you find yourself seeing it and don't walk out, well, I mad that mistake. If you actually enjoy it, please,preface all future recommendations here by noting you liked it, so I can ignore your opinion, because at least one of us is crazy.

Bob


LOL
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 7:18 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:The print I looked at had peculiar sound. It had a sort of staccato effect and then later on the dialogue was preceding the action - still, I managed to get through it. Must have been a faulty DVD?


You're watching all these Louis de Funes films on DVD? Where did you get them?

Jim


Take it they have English subtitles. THE MAD ADVENTURES OF 'RABBI' JACOB (19730 had a general release over here in England, but I can't recall if the copy I saw was dubbed or not. I recall it being very funny in places and much better than I'd expected.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Aug 13, 2017 9:57 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:THE MAD ADVENTURES OF 'RABBI' JACOB (19730 had a general release over here in England, but I can't recall if the copy I saw was dubbed or not. I recall it being very funny in places and much better than I'd expected.


I've got to revisit this film. The last time I saw it was in grade school (+/- 9 years old) when the PTA inexplicably showed it at the special school fund-raiser Saturday movie matinee. Needless to say, nobody watched it, well, none of us kids anyway. It had to have been dubbed, showing a subtitled film would have been the kookoo cherry on that nutso sundae.

The second time they tried a movie day with the Mario Bava/Boris Karloff Black Sabbath. I have no idea who was programming those films. They were...odd...choices.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Aug 14, 2017 4:58 am

Universal wouldn't spring for Technicolor for All I Desire (1953), so this Ross Hunter-Douglas Sirk soaper is a very old-fashioned effort indeed. It's not just the time setting, which looks Mauve Decade. It looks like the John Stahl weepers that Junior Laemmle dished up in the 1930s, with one or two big set-pieces. It must have been a success. After directing Taza, Son of Cochise, Sirk's next collaboration with Hunter was a remake of Stahl's Magnificent Obsession.

Whoop-de-doo! Despite Barbara Stanwyck in the lead as a woman who abandons her family to go on stage, then returns, and the beautiful b&w camerawork by Carl Guthrie, it's not my cup of tea. Technically, it's fine. I just find it uninteresting. Not everyone will, nor should they.

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Last edited by boblipton on Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Aug 14, 2017 5:00 am

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:
Jim Roots wrote:
Donald Binks wrote:The print I looked at had peculiar sound. It had a sort of staccato effect and then later on the dialogue was preceding the action - still, I managed to get through it. Must have been a faulty DVD?


You're watching all these Louis de Funes films on DVD? Where did you get them?

Jim


Take it they have English subtitles. THE MAD ADVENTURES OF 'RABBI' JACOB (19730 had a general release over here in England, but I can't recall if the copy I saw was dubbed or not. I recall it being very funny in places and much better than I'd expected.


it played here, too. I saw it and thought it was a bit of all right. Whether it was widely released in the US, I couldn't say.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Aug 14, 2017 6:19 am

boblipton wrote:
it played here, too. I saw it and thought it was a bit of all right. Whether it was widely released in the US, I couldn't say.

Bob


It played in Canada on its original release. I remember thinking it was one of the worst titles I'd ever come across.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Aug 14, 2017 2:22 pm

THREE CROOKED MEN (1958) starts off routinely with said crooks (led by Eric Pohlmann) planning a bank robbery by digging in through the grocery shop next door. What they don't know is that the proprietor, a crippled, embittered ex-boxer played by Gordon Jackson has had a blazing row with wife Sarah Lawson and is sulking in the back room. At the same time, bank clerk Warren Mitchell, terrified of the sack for staling a pen is wandering the street and becomes involved.

The robbers decide to pack up, taking Jackson and Mitchell with them, who end up being No. 1 suspects! When Lawson finds a photo of a young lady, she gets suspicious, but the two realise it could be their only clue (although the robbers seem pretty careless) and go on their trail. Jackson and Mitchell are well paired here, with a good showing from Lawson, and the bank clerk's situation is very sympathetically presented.A rather murky print, this little outing from the Danzigers becomes rather more watchable when the character element comes into play.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Aug 14, 2017 8:13 pm

The Rainbow (1989) is an uneven but interesting prequel to D.H. Lawrence's "Women in Love." Ken Russell made the latter film in 1969. In this one, young Ursula (Sammi Davis) is about to embark on a job as a teacher but ponders the role of women in modern society. She is in turns seduced by a female teacher (Amanda Donohoe) and a young engineer in the army (Paul McGann). The Donohoe and McGann characters both marry, leaving Ursula free to be a free spirit (a spinster) on her own and able to make her own decisions ... which was a big deal for women around 1900. Glenda Jackson plays the mother of Ursula and younger sister Gudrun, the character she played in Women in Love. Christopher Gable plays the father, David Hemmings, the uncle, and Jim Carter and Judith Paris play married schoolteachers. There are a few of the Lawrence/Russell flourishes and sex obsessions, but for the most part of nice study of another time. Locations are beautiful and the acting is quite good.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Aug 15, 2017 5:49 am

Jim Roots wrote:
boblipton wrote:Having had to use some poorly maintained outhouses at the height of summer and in the depths of winter, I believe that indoor plumbing is the greatest invention of mankind. As a result, I was onboard from the start of Toilet - Ek Prem Katha. Akshay Kumar and Bhumi Pednekar fall in love at first sight -- although it takes her a while to realize it.This is always a convenience, since it allows the film makers to get to the heart of the plot. Miss Pednekar has been raised with the modern conveniences, including a toilet at home, while Mr. Kumar is the son of a very conservative Brahmin in a small village, and since daddy believes that men should pee and defecate wherever they are, while women should hold it in all day and go en masse to a distant field for their business, well, Mr. Kumar believes in quick and dirty solutions to his father's dictatorial edicts.

The movie turns into a propaganda piece on modern sanitation, but never loses sites of its romantic comedy roots. The leads grow as the movie progresses and even the inevitable musical interludes work; indeed, the final one, in which Mr. Kumar admits his faults, is beautifully staged. I can't say how well anyone else will react to this movie, but I enjoyed it immensely.

Bob


Musical interludes about toilets?

Jim,
who spent his summers in the bedroom next to the world's only indoor outhouse.


Q: What do you call a musical about toilets?
A: BeanFest.

I'll be here all week, unfortunately for you folks. Don't forget to tip your waitress!

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Aug 15, 2017 3:47 pm

In the 1960s, there were a bunch of comedies about the breakdown of marriages and their saving, which edged into risque situations. The Danziger Brothers got into the act with What Every Woman Wants (1962), in which stolid, stodgy marriage counselor William Fox finally sends his wife, Hy Hazell, and his daughter fleeing for something a little more interesting... and in the end, nothing happens and things settle back into their wonted routines. You can tell its a comedy because of the xylophone music, but there isn't much else to it. Given the impending breakdown in postwar norms with the Swinging Sixties on its doorsteps, this one is pretty much a dud.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Aug 15, 2017 3:51 pm

Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937). Terrific singing and dancing scenes with Eleanor Powell, George Murphy, Judy Garland, Sophie Tucker, and more. These are like nicely toasted, flavorful honey-coated pecans on top of a stale fruitcake, so insipid, unbelievable, and boring is the horse racing story thread (of all things) that attempts to weave yet only drags these memorable music and dance bon mots together.
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