What is the last film you watched? (2017)

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boblipton

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Jul 01, 2017 7:07 pm

Victor Sjöström's last movie as a director, Under the Red Robe (1937), is a mixed result of a try at a prestige movie to celebrate Denham Studio's opening, what with a script co-written by Lajos Biros and camerawork by James Wong Howe. Raymond Massey is Cardinal Richelieu. To thwart an uprising by Hugenots, he reprieves Conrad Veidt from hanging and sends him to capture Wyndham Goldie, the leader of the Protestants. Veidt is a rogue, but when he falls in love with Goldie's sister, Annabella....

It all starts out very well, given strong compositions and a typically Sjöström-like storm raging as he slips the leash of his watchdog, Romney Brent, recovers the diamonds and offers to duel the soldiers sent to arrest anyone they can. By the end of the movie, alas, the director is overwhelmed by the rigors of dramatic form and having Mr. Brent as his dialogue director. Sjöström retired from directing movies, although he would distinguish them as an actor for the next twenty years.

For the first half, it's a great movie. Too bad t couldn't finish that way.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Jul 02, 2017 4:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Jul 01, 2017 7:25 pm

boblipton wrote:A man is killed at that most dangerous place in the world: a theater; in Murder at the Windmill (aka Murder at the Burlesque: 1949). Movie stalwart Detective Inspector Garry Marsh shows up with comic-relief sergeant Jon Pertwee to investigate. This involves recreating the show, during which the front-row victim was offed.

The Windmill, for those of you who haven't seen Mrs. Henderson Presents, was the London music hall that included tableaux vivantes to get around British law that forbade nudity on the stage -- unless the performer didn't move. Alas, the film producers didn't never offered much more than the sort of semi-revealing costumes that I saw at Radio City Music Hall as a child. Neither was I terribly impressed by the mystery aspect. I spotted the killer early on, but found no clue leading to the detection until the final revelation.

Still, there are some good, if not particularly memorable revue numbers, and the performers are pretty young women. There is also one particularly funny bit in which a comic, used to a large, appreciative audience, is forced to go through his routine for two tired, stony-faced detectives. Although it's strictly a B movie, it's a very pleasant, bright time-waster.

Bob


Terrible print but it was an interesting film. Funnily, I also guessed the killer from the get-go (I usually don't). The movie star number was interesting in that they were all American movie stars (ok maybe Greer Garson was a Brit star), and it seemed doubtful a song at the Windmill would have mentioned Park Avenue as a desirable address, but what the hay (hey?). The trombone comic was Jimmy Edwards. Garry Marsh was good as the exasperated copper.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSat Jul 01, 2017 9:03 pm

drednm wrote: The trombone comic was Jimmy Edwards.


An act he used to do on stage where he got the trombone caught up with his braces (suspenders) - and which I saw him do at the Old Tivoli in Melbourne before it closed down in 1966.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 2:20 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
drednm wrote: The trombone comic was Jimmy Edwards.


An act he used to do on stage where he got the trombone caught up with his braces (suspenders) - and which I saw him do at the Old Tivoli in Melbourne before it closed down in 1966.


There's a connection! I remember being taken by my Dad to see 'Aladdin' with Jimmy Edwards at Southsea's King's Theatre in the early 1960s. My memory, alas is very hazy - a bright setting, and a joke about a donkey's (I think) tail being used as a windscreen wiper, as well as Edwards's distinctive fruity voice is all that reaches back over the years...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 2:25 pm

s.w.a.c. wrote:
boblipton wrote:Man Hunt (1933) is one of those Young Adult movies that RKO tried out in the middle of the 1930s. Here, insteaad of Ann Shirley, they use Junior Durkin and Charlotte Henry, under the direction of Irving Cummings, with Dorothy Davenport (as "Mrs. Wallace Reid") as Junior's mother.

This is also my last film watched, and it was fairly lackluster even for an RKO programmer. Durkin's character is painfully dimwitted, to the point of frustration. Which is too bad because I remember enjoying his turn as Huckleberry Finn in the 1930 version of Tom Sawyer with Jackie Coogan. I see he also played the titular Huckleberry Finn in the follow-up film, but I haven't come across that version yet.

Tragically, he was killed at age 19, in the same car accident that killed Coogan's father and one-eyed, no-legged (!) western director Robert J. Horner.


HUCKLEBERRY FINN (1931) is on the Internet Archive, together with a better copy of the 1930 TOM SAWYER than was posten onto YouTube a while back...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 2:43 pm

Finally got round to another Dorothy Arzner movie, HONOR AMONG LOVERS (1931), which despite a so-so copy, and an irritating uploading in fourteen parts, was still well worth watching, as goodness knows when one will get to see a decent copy.

Set in the world of stock marketing, it has wealthy Jerry Stafford (Fredric March - an Arzner regular) realising that he loves secretary Julia Traynor (the wonderful Claudette Colbert) even though he's walking out with another woman. Julia is being wooed by ambitious Philip (Monroe Owsley) and marries him, much to Jerry's disgust. The septet is completed by Charlie Ruggles (more interested in drink and football than stocks and shares) and Ginger Rogers in a small but effective role as the 'pretty, but dumb' girl friend.

Of course we find out Julia / Claudette has made a ghastly mistake, which comes to a head on their first anniversary when Philip realises that not only has he lost a packet of his own money, but also a heap of 'borrowed' dough as well. I think it was the late Andrew Sarris who pointed out that many of Arzner's male characters (though don't forget the writers!) were weaklings, and Philip / Owsley is a classic example of a weak man going to pieces after his folly. This is doubled when Julia goes to see if Jerry can get him out of the mess, and Philip becomes insanely jealous.

A better copy of this movie would be very welcome, but HONOR AMONG LOVERS remains a lively piece of drama, not wholly serious, and shows what can be achieved without a slew of tiresome bedroom scenes.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 7:10 pm

Generally liking Tom Hanks' appearances in pictures I had a look at his latest offering "The Circle" (2017) - although his role is more that of a supporting player. The main player is the young gal Emma Watson, an English woman playing an American - such is the way of pictures these days.

It's quite an interesting story wrapped up as it is in the future of our every expanding technology and how it invades everyone's privacy. This film takes it the one step further into a kind of future envisaged in novels such as "1984" etc.,

From a photographic and directorial standpoint, everything is pretty much run of the mill. All the performances are adequate and there is nothing much that stands out. The saving grace therefore is in the story and subject matter which holds the viewer's interest, although the ending is rather much up in the air.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 7:20 pm

Still hovering around the latest offerings, I came across "2.22" (2017) which has a familiar ring to it. There seems to be, to my mind, a whole gamut of films that run on the "Groundhog Day" principle. This one differs slightly in theme by having a young man, Michiel Huisman. an aircraft controller, who seems obsessed with patterns in life. He finds that his days take on a familiar pattern featuring an event at 2.22pm. It's all rather silly, but we go along with it in a desperate effort to find something entertaining in it. Helping Michiel along is Teresa Palmer.

Full marks to those involved with the project for trying to make up something completely different along familiar channels, but I found it rather much lost its way about three quarters of the way through when the story got involved with some degree of reincarnation and thus became even more weird.

This was an Australian picture, set in New York - with inside photography done in studios in Sydney and location photography done in New York.

(I suppose the music was recorded with an orchestra in Prague, the post sound work done in London, animation done in South Korea, post production done in Moscow and some extra work done in Rio de Janiero?)
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 7:39 pm

"The Mighty" (1929) is a mighty fine film for 1929, because it is just so fluid - fluidity is something that most films of this year lacked. This is down to director John Cromwell who, in some respects, is quite ahead of his time. He even uses sound to advantage, totally relying on it to convey what's happening in a scene photographed in an almost pitch black room.

George Bancroft is one again a "heavy" criminal. He has been shirking the draft in 1917 but the MP's eventually catch up with him and ship him off to France to do his bit. He becomes a hero even though he is totally cynical about the war. His Lieutenant (Morgan Farley) is a frightened mess and jealous of the medals George earns; however he finally pulls himself together for one heroic action and dies in George's arms.

After the war, George goes back to Morgan's parents to tell them personally of their son's heroism and whilst in the town he is offered the job of police chief in order to rid the town of criminals. He turns over a new leaf and does his job well, finally doing in the criminal gang he used to belong to.

I found this quite an enjoyable film with good pacing and mostly good acting - although Morgan Farley plays it up for all it's worth. The cast has been chosen well. Raymond Hatton is quite believable as a pint-sized crook, Warner Oland is a crime boss, O.P. Heggie (the Aussie) is the bereaved father and Esther Ralston, his daughter (George's love interest). Dorothy Revier has also been thrown in for good measure as the typical "moll".

I must have at least 50 films in my collection from the golden year 1929 - and this is one of the better ones.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 7:57 pm

I always thought of Douglas Fairbanks Jr. D.B.E., D.S.C., as a very debonair fellow and I was lucky enough to have seen him acting on stage as well as in pictures. In his early films he was a bit soppy for me, but in 1938's "The Rage of Paris", although a romance, I found him relatively tolerable.

This picture is one of those mad mix-up type of things where Danielle Darrieux is trying to get a job 'cause she is broke. She ends up going to the wrong man's office - where Mr. Fairbanks Jr comes in. She is friends with Helen Broderick who is friends with Mischa Auer, a head waiter who has saved up $3,000 in order to open up his own restaurant. Together these three hatch up a scheme whereby they can get Danielle to marry rich Louis Hayward and thus get their hands on to more of the folding stuff. Louis is a friend of Douglas and the latter eventually falls in love with Danielle. It's simple isn't it?

This tripe would ordinarily be unbearable, but in the hands of the aforementioned in the cast, it all becomes quite delightful. One gets the impression very early on that they are all having the time of their lives romping around in this and that certainly comes across. Mischa Auer gets full marks for a fine characterisation that combines charm, confusion and European temperament all in one bundle. Also in the cast is Harry Davenport who lends a sort of rustic charm to otherwise scenes of high elegance.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostSun Jul 02, 2017 8:08 pm

It has been a while since my last dose of Louis de Funes so I put on another DVD in by de Funes collection. This time it was "Carambolages" from 1963. This time Messieur de Funes decides to take his apoplectic fits because he is the managing director of a prestige travel agency situated on the Champs Elysee. We don't get too much of him as this is really a starring vehicle for Jean-Claude Brialy - a low ranking officer in the firm who is desperately trying to work his way up because he is getting married to Sophie Daumier. The firm though does not reward success, all promotion is strictly in rotation according to rank.

A lot of this film is just so-so, letting the romantic angle get too much of a look in - but when we do get to the comedy, it is quite madcap - especially as all the ranked managers in order of succession seem to meet their end in one way or another in very strange circumstances.

Louis de Funes is not in it as much as he should be, but when he does grace the screen he is a joy to behold. There is just something in the way he puts over his lines. There is so much going on - he doesn't miss a trick - even in throw away gestures or expressions, all a delight and sure to bring at least a wide smile to the dial.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Jul 03, 2017 6:18 pm

The one good thing about having a pile of DVD's on the "to watch" pile is that by the time one gets around to looking at one of them, one hasn't a clue what the picture is all about. I therefore was a tad dismayed at the start of "The House on 56th Street" (1933) because I thought I was going to have to sit through some rather boring period film set at the turn of the 20th century. However, this impression was only momentary as the picture "opened out" and took turns in direction that were completely unexpected. In the end it was all quite fascinating and extremely engrossing.

The story centres around the life of Kay Francis. She starts off as a chorus girl in 1905 and marries one of her stage door Johnies. Then she is hit with the unexpected. Her dignity suffers and twenty years pass. She has to find a new life and get back on her feet. She does so in quite a surprising way - but are the experiences she once went through going to repeat themselves?

Kay Francis is quite wonderful. She draws every nuance into the character and makes the audience sympathetic towards her. She is aided by Gene Raymond who plays her husband, John Halliday as the man who has always been in love with her but never able to get her and Ricardo Cortez whom she meets later on in her life. Also in the cast are Margaret Lindsay, Frank McHugh and William 'Stage' Boyd. It is directed by Robert Florey.

I often wonder if modern day directors ever look at pictures like these? It seems to me that no, they don't for if they did they would find that, yes, one can make a picture with a complicated story, make it very fluid and also make it with a reasonable running time.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Jul 03, 2017 7:25 pm

>yes, one can make a picture with a complicated story, make it very fluid and also make it with a reasonable running time.<

Good one- and two- hour television episodes and movies fulfill the need for swifter entertainment now, that single features that were often partnered with shorts and a B feature did then. Moviegoers pay more, and generally expect a fuller, more theatrical event in movie houses today.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Jul 03, 2017 7:30 pm

wich2 wrote:. Moviegoers pay more, and generally expect a fuller, more theatrical event in movie houses today.


Which is why I say, get rid of all those blasted advertisments that have taken the place of a programme - bring back the orchestras, the organs and the first half with stage items and short films! (Do you think it'll happen?) :D
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Jul 03, 2017 8:45 pm

Well, in Chicago the Arclight chain is advertising how they've gotten rid of the advertisements.

And The Music Box begins with organ accompaniment by Dennis Scott.



So it all exists. if not always in the same place.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostMon Jul 03, 2017 8:48 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:Well, in Chicago the Arclight chain is advertising how they've gotten rid of the advertisements.

And The Music Box begins with organ accompaniment by Dennis Scott.
So it all exists. if not always in the same place.


Hooray! Common sense prevails at least in some parts of the world! (I must take in Chicago in my next visit to the U.S. I ain't been there since '58)
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Jul 04, 2017 2:43 pm

When even Marty Feldman isn't funny, you know the film is in trouble. Every Home Should Have One (1970) casts Feldman as a hapless advertising man who is on a campaign for frozen porridge. He's on a work team headed by a snarky American Shelley Berman). His home life is rocky as his wife (Judy Cornwell) is on a religious kick. They also have an 11-year-old for whom they hire a nanny (Julie Ege). Her arrival sets Feldman off in a serious of sex-oriented daydreams seen as cartoons or silent movies. Seems like the basic premise was ripe for picking, but this one has only a few funny bits. The rest of the cast is pretty lifeless with the exception of Penelope Keith as a German S&M type nanny (but even she gets little to do).
Some familiar faces: Frances de la Tour, Patrick Cargill, Patience Collier (channeling Mrs. Slocombe), Moray Watson, and Hy Hazell as Berman's wife (in her final film appearance).
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Jul 04, 2017 4:24 pm

I just looked at George Arliss' last movie, Dr. Syn (1937). When 18th century revenue agents come to a small Kentish town to investigate smuggling, they discover a mysterious figure called "The Scarecrow" who seems to haunt the marshes. Arliss plays the local parson with his usual light touch; he also has a large number of secrets, including the parentage of local bar maid Margaret Lockwood, whom every young buck wants to marry. Director Roy William Neill directs with his usual impeccable touches, allowing his leading actors a free hand for their speeches -- although how he might have restrained Arliss, should the World's Greatest Actor have objected is an interesting question.

Unhappily, the print I saw was a dark one, and the lengthy night scenes were obscure. Even so, this was a delightful movie for Arliss to have ended his movie career on.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Jul 04, 2017 7:36 pm

The First National and Vitaphone Talking Picture "The Last Flight" made in 1931 is quite unusual and must have stunned audiences on its original release. The fact that it is so different from its contemporaries lies heavily with its director Wilhelm Dieterle, making his first American picture. He has given the picture a decidedly waspish edge bordering on the noir.

Essentially the film is about a group of American airmen who came close to death during the Great War. They are incapable of dealing with an ordinary life after their horrid experiences and drift about meaninglessly after the war ends, drinking heavily and generally trying to have a good time. They meet a hedonistic girl in Paris who they seem to adopt as a sort of mascot.

The dialogue at times is strange too - as if it was written to be delivered by Gracie Allen; it's an echo to the meaningless lives being eked out. Luckily this film is pre-Code and thus a lot of the dialogue is of a variety that certainly would not have passed the do-gooders. Certainly too, the amount of drinking that goes on throughout the film would have been frowned upon by some whilst others - having lived through the prohibition - would have found it quite entertaining.

This picture is a very subtle representation of men dealing with post-traumatic stress, a problem that was not known about until quite recently. Men who had suffered deep psychological wounds in the Great War were left to tend for themselves and deal with their problems alone. Many turned to drink and a devil-may-care attitude as a crutch and this is borne out in the film.

Richard Barthelmess is the mainstay of the group and perhaps the least damaged as he is always trying to find his way out of the group. Although known more for his intensity, Barthelmess manages to relax his usual persona and show some lightheartedness. The other members of the group are David Manners giving quite a good performance and showing that he could act when given the opportunity, Johnny Mack Brown and Elliott Nugent. The girl is Helen Chandler who gives a very natural performance.

All in all a very interesting picture which at first would appear to be rather glib until one gets drift of the sub-text.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostTue Jul 04, 2017 7:57 pm

"The Right of Way" (1931) is the talking picture re-make of the silent picture of the same name from 1920. It is a moralistic story from that period of time when it was felt necessary to preach to the masses about right and wrong.

Conrad Nagel who was all too often cast as a second lead, stars in this as a snobbish, foppish Canadian barrister. The film opens with him defending his client and then ignoring him when he gets him off. He has a ne'er do well brother-in-law who is always into him for a hand-out and he hardly ever pays any attention to his wife. He is in fact, a rather nasty piece of work. Anyway, he thinks he can better a group of criminals in a bar one night and naturally he comes off second best and is thrown into the river. He is then fished out by the man he defended and taken to some remote hut to recuperate but he has lost his memory. He falls in love with a local girl and becomes somewhat good in his new life, but the old memories come back to him and he must live with the consequences.

Mr. Nagel gives a mannered performance which probably would be better suited to the stage but nevertheless he is quite enjoyable to watch - and to listen to. (He had a very good speaking voice). Fred Kohler plays the lumbering lumberjack who was the defended man and Loretta Young plays the leading lady with a degree of innocence (necessary for the part) and some degree of Joie de vivre. Snitz Edwards has a small role as does Halliwell Hobbes.

Perhaps this picture shows its age by being a bit of a creaking melodrama, but if you make allowances for the time in which it was made, it is quite enjoyable for what it is.

Canadians would be upset by the fact that the film carries off the impression that nearly everyone in Canada wears a check (plaid) jacket and check shirt and cuts down trees, also, those who live outside cities speak English poorly and gruffly.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Jul 05, 2017 5:07 am

boblipton wrote:I just looked at George Arliss' last movie, Dr. Syn (1937). When 18th century revenue agents come to a small Kentish town to investigate smuggling, they discover a mysterious figure called "The Scarecrow" who seems to haunt the marshes. Arliss plays the local parson with his usual light touch; he also has a large number of secrets, including the parentage of local bar maid Margaret Lockwood, whom every young buck wants to marry. Director Roy William Neill directs with his usual impeccable touches, allowing his leading actors a free hand for their speeches -- although how he might have restrained Arliss, should the World's Greatest Actor have objected is an interesting question.

Unhappily, the print I saw was a dark one, and the lengthy night scenes were obscure. Even so, this was a delightful movie for Arliss to have ended his movie career on.

Bob

Though not based on a real person, the film is based on a series of novels by Russell Thorndike, and the novels are based upon very similar incidents that occurred at Romney Marsh in the eighteenth century. I have always been a great fan of this film, and my wife and I have watched it a number of times over the last ten years. I think it's one of Arliss' best films. I'd be curious what Bob Fells feels about this film - that is, if the world's expert on Arliss wishes to opine...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Jul 05, 2017 5:51 am

Donald Binks wrote:The First National and Vitaphone Talking Picture "The Last Flight" made in 1931 is quite unusual and must have stunned audiences on its original release. The fact that it is so different from its contemporaries lies heavily with its director Wilhelm Dieterle, making his first American picture. He has given the picture a decidedly waspish edge bordering on the noir.

Essentially the film is about a group of American airmen who came close to death during the Great War. They are incapable of dealing with an ordinary life after their horrid experiences and drift about meaninglessly after the war ends, drinking heavily and generally trying to have a good time. They meet a hedonistic girl in Paris who they seem to adopt as a sort of mascot.

The dialogue at times is strange too - as if it was written to be delivered by Gracie Allen; it's an echo to the meaningless lives being eked out. Luckily this film is pre-Code and thus a lot of the dialogue is of a variety that certainly would not have passed the do-gooders. Certainly too, the amount of drinking that goes on throughout the film would have been frowned upon by some whilst others - having lived through the prohibition - would have found it quite entertaining.

This picture is a very subtle representation of men dealing with post-traumatic stress, a problem that was not known about until quite recently. Men who had suffered deep psychological wounds in the Great War were left to tend for themselves and deal with their problems alone. Many turned to drink and a devil-may-care attitude as a crutch and this is borne out in the film.

Richard Barthelmess is the mainstay of the group and perhaps the least damaged as he is always trying to find his way out of the group. Although known more for his intensity, Barthelmess manages to relax his usual persona and show some lightheartedness. The other members of the group are David Manners giving quite a good performance and showing that he could act when given the opportunity, Johnny Mack Brown and Elliott Nugent. The girl is Helen Chandler who gives a very natural performance.

All in all a very interesting picture which at first would appear to be rather glib until one gets drift of the sub-text.

To me, this John Monk Saunders written film always has reminded me of reading a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I think it's a great film, one of the finest from 1931, but it's not for everybody. For those who are familiar with the ex-patriots living in France during the 20's, this will be a revelation of sorts...
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostWed Jul 05, 2017 2:45 pm

Donald Binks wrote:Canadians would be upset by the fact that the film carries off the impression that nearly everyone in Canada wears a check (plaid) jacket and check shirt and cuts down trees, also, those who live outside cities speak English poorly and gruffly.


Eh?

I'll let Swacky take these guys into the corner with his Gordie Howe elbows up.

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 1:58 pm

If life is a circus if you're Fellini, that's all well and good. there was only one Fellini, and he's dead. For most of us, life is a struggle. For a young woman trying to make her way, it's filled with rude men and the fear of rape if you hear a stranger's foot steps at night.

Don't get me wrong. I love Fellini, but Antonio Petrangeli offers a different view of la dolce vita in Lo la conoscevo bene (I Knew Her Well: 1965). Stefania Sandrelli tries to make a go of it in a cynical and greedy world.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 2:48 pm

boblipton wrote:If life is a circus if you're Fellini, that's all well and good. there was only one Fellini, and he's dead. For most of us, life is a struggle. For a young woman trying to make her way, it's filled with rude men and the fear of rape if you hear a stranger's foot steps at night.

Don't get me wrong. I love Fellini, but Antonio Petrangeli offers a different view of la dolce vita in Lo la conoscevo bene (I Knew Her Well: 1065). Stefania Sandrelli tries to make a go of it in a cynical and greedy world.

Bob


Presumably they were using nitrate in the year 1065.

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 2:50 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
boblipton wrote:If life is a circus if you're Fellini, that's all well and good. there was only one Fellini, and he's dead. For most of us, life is a struggle. For a young woman trying to make her way, it's filled with rude men and the fear of rape if you hear a stranger's foot steps at night.

Don't get me wrong. I love Fellini, but Antonio Petrangeli offers a different view of la dolce vita in Lo la conoscevo bene (I Knew Her Well: 1065). Stefania Sandrelli tries to make a go of it in a cynical and greedy world.

Bob


Presumably they were using nitrate in the year 1065.

Jim


That's why the battle footage from Stamford Bridge and Hastings is lost.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 7:18 pm

Thanks be that there was Safety in time for the Chris Columbus Expedition!
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 8:39 pm

I had just recently seen a very ordinary picture with Leslie Fuller in it, so I was a bit dubious about watching another with him in it. As it turned out "The Last Coupon" (1932) was a much better film, in that being a comedy, it was actually quite funny - here and there.

Leslie is a coal miner oop north, in Yorkshire, lad. He does pools and thinks ticket he's got 's good for 20,000 pounds. Wife dreams of what it's be like if 't wins and eee, s'not so grand.

The whole thing takes a bit of a while to get going and the best scenes are in the dream sequence when the imagining takes place. It's a case of chalk and cheese as the northerners are entertaining the society set in their London apartment. The funniest scenes are when one of their neighbours turns up - she is a bit of a scream.

Not a riot but mildly amusing sufficient to pass away 84 minutes moderately pleasantly. Mary Jerrold is the rather dour wife, with Marian Dawson as that neighbour.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostThu Jul 06, 2017 8:56 pm

Still wandering around in 1932 I happened upon "His Wife's Mother" which is a farce derived from the stage. And, blow me down, if it don't have nearly the same cast as the last picture I just saw!

As a farce it is actually a lot funnier than that last picture and is a lot more sophisticated. The plot lines are complicated as they need to be in farces and all work well. The gags roll on and on and no device is left out that can provide some added amusement. In particular one should mention one vehicular conveyance which should get star billing by itself.

To try and tell you the plot would require me writing up about ten pages - and then I would get myself mixed up. Suffice to say that this film goes on about mistaken identities and people posing as others and all that sort of thing, if you catch my drift.

It's a whole lot of fun and completely ridiculous - and sometimes the ridiculous is a well needed ointment.

From the cast, the names which should receive mention are Gus McNaughton as Joy, the butler. Very much in the Wodehouse tradition, he is a lot more clever than his master and sets up a lot of what happens in the film. Molly Lamont hangs around to decorate the set. Marian Dawson who was quite a scream as the Yorkshire neighbour in the film above now switches accents to that of a home counties dragoness who has great difficulty in not complaining about everything that is going on all about her whilst Jimmy Godden with a suitable walrus moustache plays her dipsomaniac husband.

Well worth taking a peek at - particularly for Ms Dawson's performance which is classic.
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2017)

PostFri Jul 07, 2017 5:25 am

boblipton wrote:
Jim Roots wrote:
boblipton wrote:If life is a circus if you're Fellini, that's all well and good. there was only one Fellini, and he's dead. For most of us, life is a struggle. For a young woman trying to make her way, it's filled with rude men and the fear of rape if you hear a stranger's foot steps at night.

Don't get me wrong. I love Fellini, but Antonio Petrangeli offers a different view of la dolce vita in Lo la conoscevo bene (I Knew Her Well: 1065). Stefania Sandrelli tries to make a go of it in a cynical and greedy world.

Bob


Presumably they were using nitrate in the year 1065.

Jim


That's why the battle footage from Stamford Bridge and Hastings is lost.

Bob

Actually, Bob, it's been preserved. F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre watched it years ago and his review inspired entire generations of historians to argue the relative merits of fighting near chalk cliffs, limestone quarries, mud, or simply having Angevins do the fighting instead of Normans.
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