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Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:37 pm
by sepiatone
I learned of this on an internet show. Some say its the best film made (and certainly of 2016). Anybody seen it? and your opinions?

Re: Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 2:15 am
by Penfold
sepiatone wrote:I learned of this on an internet show. Some say its the best film made (and certainly of 2016). Anybody seen it? and your opinions?


Best film I saw last year.....and when it was screened again locally, I went again. Brilliantly directed, great scenario; characters you do give a damn about, character arcs over the length of the film. Not just your standard zombie flick. Well worth your time and dollars; it was my way in to South Korean cinema and have spent a fair chunk of the year since catching up, seeing what I had missed, which was a fair few fine films.

Re: Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:59 am
by Arndt
I have not seen this film, but am I the only person who is perplexed by the ubiquity of zombies these days? They seem to be everywhere on big or small screens. Frankly I find them not interesting enough to warrant so much attention. Also, how can you still make zombie movies after SHAUN OF THE DEAD?

Re: Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:25 am
by boblipton
Arndt wrote:I have not seen this film, but am I the only person who is perplexed by the ubiquity of zombies these days? They seem to be everywhere on big or small screens. Frankly I find them not interesting enough to warrant so much attention. Also, how can you still make zombie movies after SHAUN OF THE DEAD?


Well, I'm not a fan of Zombie movies in particular, nor horror in general; it all seems to me to be Jump fright, if you take my meaning. It's lost its symbolic meaning, so important for non-mimetic fiction.

However, so long as people go to see zombie movies, they'll make more.

Bob

Re: Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:37 am
by Arndt
boblipton wrote:However, so long as people go to see zombie movies, they'll make more.Bob


I get that. What I do not get is why people have not grown tired of them. Zombies are such lazy, generic threats. I like my monsters to have darkly romantic back stories which may offer more possibilities for resolution than a bullet to the head. Zombies are the popcorn of the monster universe.

Re: Train to Busan (2016) Korean

PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:31 am
by Mike Gebert
I watched Train to Busan last night, and join in the general praise-- it's a textbook example of managing suspense, with moments when the peril is lessened so it can come roaring back. I admired that there is, well, as little gore as there could be-- none of the cartoonish stuff that often happens in zombie movies, partly because they basically have no weapons, so no extreme gore (by modern standards)-- no heads getting blown off in particular. It lays out a simple premise-- trapped on a bullet train by zombies, but also protected from whatever else is out there by the fact that you're moving toward possible safety-- so the options for self-preservation are as tightly defined as those in Apollo 13, and more of the drama ultimately comes from how the people react to the threat than the zombies per se. There's also a smart undercurrent of social satire, from the blandness of the official announcements as hell is breaking loose (shades of another recent Asian film, Shin Godzilla, which is a Godzilla film from, basically, the point of view of governmental crisis response), to the ubiquity of cell phones and other media as the crisis unfolds.

It also makes the elephantine World War Z look like that much more of a waste of money. Supposedly David Fincher is working on a World War Z 2, but much as I respect him as a craftsman, he should bow out and give the budget and reins to Yeon Sang-ho, who's to zombies what Lubitsch was to romantic comedy.

Interesting note about the zombies here—as much as they draw on movie zombie lore (28 Days Later in particular), they are also clearly descended in part from other Asian monsters, not the Godzilla type but, for instance, the vampires in the Mr. Vampire series, which can be stopped cold by sticking a scroll with words from Confucius to their foreheads (that in turns seems descended from the Golem, but may be coincidental). The zombies here turn out to be stopped, temporarily, by something that happens on trains from time to time— a neat, credible addition to zombie lore used perfectly here.