Recycled Music

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Mike Gebert

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Re: Recycled Music

PostSat Sep 30, 2017 2:53 pm

They're not exactly the same, but it's impossible not to think that the Salkinds said, "Write Superman one of those!"
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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FrankFay

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Re: Recycled Music

PostSat Sep 30, 2017 3:30 pm

djwein wrote:I'm very familiar with Malcolm's Arnold's classic Oscar-winning score for THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI. I noticed recently that quite a few of its themes are recycled in DUNKIRK and THE CHALK GARDEN, especially those cues that portend trouble.



It could be a bit like a technique used today (and complained about): a composer will be shown another film, generally a hit, and be told "Make it sound like this, but just different enough that we get sued". The practice of using other film scores on rough cuts almost ensures this.
Eric Stott
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Jack Theakston

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Re: Recycled Music

PostTue Oct 03, 2017 8:46 pm

BixB wrote:The end music for FRANKENSTEIN was reused for the opening credits of COUNSELOR AT LAW. Then of course there's the whole Swan Lake thing.


Which was, in itself, a silent film cue that went back to the 'teens ("Grand Appassionato" by G. Becce.)
J. Theakston
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George O'Brien

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Re: Recycled Music

PostTue Oct 03, 2017 9:50 pm

Catching on TCM an unheralded, but good, British film entitled "The Walking Stick"(1970), I couldn't help but think that I had heard some of the music before. In a "Eureka!" moment, it came to me - "The Deer Hunter"! Two more dissimilar films I can't imagine, but the melancholy, reflective, acoustic guitar driven theme worked well in both films
"This bar of likker is now a bar of justice!"
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16mm4FR

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Re: Recycled Music

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 12:18 am

Life's too short, but the classic Warner Bros. cartoon have thousands...MILLIONS...of them.
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Harlett O'Dowd

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Re: Recycled Music

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 7:53 am

and then there's the re-use of studio-owned songs as background music in subsequent films. One of the earliest is "I'm The Queen" from MGM's HOLLYWOOD REVUE being recycled in Buster's FREE AND EASY.

And the WB cartoons quoted their catalog ("The Lady in Red," "They're Either Too Young or Too Old") shamelessly.
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boblipton

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Re: Recycled Music

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 8:04 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:and then there's the re-use of studio-owned songs as background music in subsequent films. One of the earliest is "I'm The Queen" from MGM's HOLLYWOOD REVUE being recycled in Buster's FREE AND EASY.

And the WB cartoons quoted their catalog ("The Lady in Red," "They're Either Too Young or Too Old") shamelessly.



Originally the Schlesinger cartoons were issued in two batches: "Looney Tunes" and "Merrie Melodies". Although both were intended to exploit the Warner Brothers' music library, both the new stuff written for the movies and acquired when they bought Brunswick and four sheet publishers, one series was contractually required to feature a song from the Wanrers Library -- which the staff hated because they hadn't figured out how to figure out how to integrate the music into the action. Surprisingly, it was Earl Duvall who figured out how to do it in Sittin' on a Backyard Fence (1933). But they still hated it.

The quotes you refer to were due to Carl Stalling, who invented mickeymousing while he was working with Disney. THink of them as situational leitmotifs.

Bob
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Harlett O'Dowd

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Re: Recycled Music

PostWed Oct 04, 2017 9:08 am

boblipton wrote:The quotes you refer to were due to Carl Stalling, who invented mickeymousing while he was working with Disney. THink of them as situational leitmotifs.

Bob


don't "situational leitmotifs" go back to the playing of "Hearts and Flowers" during stage melodramas?
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Mister Renfield

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Re: Recycled Music

PostThu Oct 05, 2017 1:06 am

Alfred Newman recycled themes from THE ROBE in THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD, especially during the Raising of Lazarus.
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Re: Recycled Music

PostThu Oct 05, 2017 7:22 pm

Mister Renfield wrote:Alfred Newman recycled themes from THE ROBE in THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD, especially during the Raising of Lazarus.


And it was done only under duress, at the insistence of George Stevens.
-Rich
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