I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gems

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Phillyrich

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I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gems

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 8:21 am

I wonder if there are any fans out there of old horror or early sci fi "B" movies that are little gems.
I generally go back from the 1930's, thru the 1960's.

"I Married A Monster From Outer Space" (1958) for example, has one of the goofiest titles ever, but is a fine,
taut little science fiction (or is it a horror?) film. So is the better known and better titled: "The Incredible Shrinking Man."
Last edited by Phillyrich on Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 12:58 pm

IMaMfOS was in a long-running syndication package when I was an impressionable cineaste so it's got a well preserved spot in my heart. It also doesn't hurt that one of the cast members was the local newscaster for a rival station so that no doubt kept goading the TV station to keep running it, just to push his buttons. Monolith Monsters was also in the package and is, imho, highly underrated.

Throw in Robinson Crusoe on Mars and you've got a solid afternoon of absurdly titled, quality schlock sci fi.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostWed Sep 27, 2017 5:46 pm

"I Married A Monster From Outer Space" (1958) was very memorable for me - Gloria Talbott really shone in that movie - there are a number of B-sci-fi actresses I very much like and she is one of them (a few others include Yvette Vickers, Linda Christian, and Allison Hayes).
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 4:22 pm

We recently watched Robinson Crusoe on Mars and The Incredible Shrinking Man. I was spellbound throughout both. Robinson features an intriguing story with many imaginative twists, creative effects, and Paul Mantee, who I still can't believe never became an A-list star.

Shrinking Man is bone-chilling, shocking, and so well-written that some of the narration edges close to memorable, especially the ending that left me in tears after his final sentence as he was disappearing for the last time . . . such a metaphor for all human life:

"I was continuing to shrink, to become . . . what? The infinitesimal? What was I? Still a human being? Or was I the man of the future? If there were other bursts of radiation, other clouds drifting across seas and continents, would other beings follow me into this vast new world? So close - the infinitesimal and the infinite. But suddenly, I knew they were really the two ends of the same concept. The unbelievably small and the unbelievably vast eventually meet - like the closing of a gigantic circle. I looked up, as if somehow I would grasp the heavens. The universe, worlds beyond number, God's silver tapestry spread across the night. And in that moment, I knew the answer to the riddle of the infinite. I had thought in terms of man's own limited dimension. I had presumed upon nature. That existence begins and ends in man's conception, not nature's. And I felt my body dwindling, melting, becoming nothing. My fears melted away. And in their place came acceptance. All this vast majesty of creation, it had to mean something. And then I meant something, too. Yes, smaller than the smallest, I meant something, too. To God, there is no zero. I still exist!

[ By the way, I see that BearManor has the first Grant Williams biography coming out soon. Have already ordered my advance copy: http://www.bearmanormedia.com/grant-wil ... arch=grant" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank" target="_blank ]
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 5:06 pm

MaryGH wrote:"I Married A Monster From Outer Space" (1958) was very memorable for me - Gloria Talbott really shone in that movie - there are a number of B-sci-fi actresses I very much like and she is one of them (a few others include Yvette Vickers, Linda Christian, and Allison Hayes).


I watched it again recently, it holds up very well and it's Talbott's show all the way--Tryon was pretty but one note. Which, admittedly, fit his role in the film well. Quite a few of those 50s SF films are more imaginative than you'd think given their absurd titles.

Then again, some of them are howlers. I enjoy those every bit as much.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 6:04 pm

I love both the good ones and the so bad they are good ones. Just watched The last Man on Earth again recently. One of the good ones, I think.

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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 6:09 pm

[quote="2 Reel"]We recently watched Robinson Crusoe on Mars and The Incredible Shrinking Man. I was spellbound throughout both. Robinson features an intriguing story with many imaginative twists, creative effects, and Paul Mantee, who I still can't believe never became an A-list star.

Shrinking Man is bone-chilling, shocking, and so well-written that some of the narration edges close to memorable, especially the ending that left me in tears after his final sentence as he was disappearing for the last time . . . such a metaphor for all human life:

"I was continuing to shrink, to become . . . what? The infinitesimal? What was I? Still a human being? Or was I the man of the future? If there were other bursts of radiation, other clouds drifting across seas and continents, would other beings follow me into this vast new world? So close - the infinitesimal and the infinite. But suddenly, I knew they were really the two ends of the same concept. The unbelievably small and the unbelievably vast eventually meet - like the closing of a gigantic circle. I looked up, as if somehow I would grasp the heavens. The universe, worlds beyond number, God's silver tapestry spread across the night. And in that moment, I knew the answer to the riddle of the infinite. I had thought in terms of man's own limited dimension. I had presumed upon nature. That existence begins and ends in man's conception, not nature's. And I felt my body dwindling, melting, becoming nothing. My fears melted away. And in their place came acceptance. All this vast majesty of creation, it had to mean something. And then I meant something, too. Yes, smaller than the smallest, I meant something, too. To God, there is no zero. I still exist!

Thank you for sharing this! I remember seeing ROBINSON CRUSOE ON MARS in the theatre! I think TISM has the most literate ending of any sci-fi film, ever. On the surface, the ending is tragic, but once our hero looks philosophically at his fate, it's really very inspiring.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 7:34 pm

Frederica wrote:
MaryGH wrote:"I Married A Monster From Outer Space" (1958) was very memorable for me - Gloria Talbott really shone in that movie - there are a number of B-sci-fi actresses I very much like and she is one of them (a few others include Yvette Vickers, Linda Christian, and Allison Hayes).


I watched it again recently, it holds up very well and it's Talbott's show all the way--Tryon was pretty but one note. Which, admittedly, fit his role in the film well. Quite a few of those 50s SF films are more imaginative than you'd think given their absurd titles.

Then again, some of them are howlers. I enjoy those every bit as much.


I wonder where "Attack of the 50 ft Woman" and "The Blob" fall on that scale. And that is not a knock on either one...I very much enjoy both.

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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 7:44 pm

2 Reel wrote:
Shrinking Man is bone-chilling, shocking, and so well-written that some of the narration edges close to memorable, especially the ending that left me in tears after his final sentence as he was disappearing for the last time . . . such a metaphor for all human life:

"I was continuing to shrink, to become . . . what? The infinitesimal? What was I? Still a human being? Or was I the man of the future? If there were other bursts of radiation, other clouds drifting across seas and continents, would other beings follow me into this vast new world? So close - the infinitesimal and the infinite. But suddenly, I knew they were really the two ends of the same concept. The unbelievably small and the unbelievably vast eventually meet - like the closing of a gigantic circle. I looked up, as if somehow I would grasp the heavens. The universe, worlds beyond number, God's silver tapestry spread across the night. And in that moment, I knew the answer to the riddle of the infinite. I had thought in terms of man's own limited dimension. I had presumed upon nature. That existence begins and ends in man's conception, not nature's. And I felt my body dwindling, melting, becoming nothing. My fears melted away. And in their place came acceptance. All this vast majesty of creation, it had to mean something. And then I meant something, too. Yes, smaller than the smallest, I meant something, too. To God, there is no zero. I still exist!



That brings to mind, "Terror from the Year 5000" with a radiation-theme variation and human mutations. Kind of campy, one of those shown on Mystery Science Theatre 3000, but gets its message across. Salome Jens, who portrayed the human mutation from the future, also starred in a bunch of Star Trek Deep Space Nine episodes, plus an episode of Star Trek The Next Generation.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostThu Sep 28, 2017 8:18 pm

Another very good 1950's sci fi film is THEM, and while the giant mutant ants are not very convincing, the detective story unfolding step by step with James Whitmore, is very well done, as are the scenes in the Los Angeles (?) sewer system.

Same with INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956)--very well told tale with an unforgettably desperate Kevin McCarthy, almost like a film noir.

There really were a lot of good little b/w sci fi films in the 1950's. And great special effects or CGI weren't necessary when the story was so well told.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 8:06 am

Phillyrich wrote:Another very good 1950's sci fi film is THEM, and while the giant mutant ants are not very convincing, the detective story unfolding step by step with James Whitmore, is very well done, as are the scenes in the Los Angeles (?) sewer system.

Same with INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956)--very well told tale with an unforgettably desperate Kevin McCarthy, almost like a film noir.

There really were a lot of good little b/w sci fi films in the 1950's. And great special effects or CGI weren't necessary when the story was so well told.


I saw THEM again a few years back on tv while at a hotel, and as I watched I remember thinking, hey, this is really well directed. Of course it's not really a cheapie and has decent effects (compared to, say, the one with the grasshoppers crawling on the photo of a building or the alien hybrid of a gorilla and diver).

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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 8:46 am

I think that Jack Arnold is one of those directors who did very well with not much. Although he is probably best remembered for directing Peter Sellers in an early vehicle, The Mouse That Roared, he did very well for himself at Universal, exploring the subtext that exists in all decent horror and science fiction. Yeah, the purpose of stuff like The Creature From the Black Lagoon and The Incredible Shrinking Man are about things that comes out of dark places and men that get teeny-tiny, but the reason they disturb us is that they hit our buttons, and the people who made them knew it.

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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 9:01 am

mwalls wrote:
Frederica wrote:I watched it again recently, it holds up very well and it's Talbott's show all the way--Tryon was pretty but one note. Which, admittedly, fit his role in the film well. Quite a few of those 50s SF films are more imaginative than you'd think given their absurd titles.

Then again, some of them are howlers. I enjoy those every bit as much.


I wonder where "Attack of the 50 ft Woman" and "The Blob" fall on that scale. And that is not a knock on either one...I very much enjoy both.

Matthew


On my scale, they land on the ends. The Blob is a tight little thriller, even if it is about jello taking over the earth. 50 Foot Woman is extremely enjoyable and better than War of the Colossol Beast. Erm.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 9:06 am

greta de groat wrote:I saw THEM again a few years back on tv while at a hotel, and as I watched I remember thinking, hey, this is really well directed. Of course it's not really a cheapie and has decent effects (compared to, say, the one with the grasshoppers crawling on the photo of a building or the alien hybrid of a gorilla and diver).

Greta


Then there's The Lost Continent, where Cesar Romero shouts "It's a Tyrannosaurus Rex!" when it's clearly an iguana. They can't all be winners.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 9:12 am

Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956) is usually thought of as a Ray Harryhausen opus, but I think its plot is well thought out and the speculative science used in the film to explain the alien beings and their technology stands up pretty well today.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostFri Sep 29, 2017 10:03 am

I know a lot of people on here enjoy going to conventions. And while this is not a "pure" film convention compared to a Cinecon or Capitalfest, there is an annual convention in Mars, PA (very close to Pittsburgh) called the Monster Bash. I am posting a link below. This is a popular convention attended by hundreds of people from across the US and the convention is all about classic horror and sci-fi. It does not cover modern "horror" or slasher films. I have attended a couple of times and hope to get back next year. If you are interested in the genre, and can put it in your schedule, I highly recommend.


http://www.monsterbashnews.com/bash-June.html

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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostSun Oct 01, 2017 4:44 pm

"The Thing From Another World" (1951) played on the cold war paranoia of the fifties. The technology and the players may have changed but still plenty of paranoia today. And the possibility of life on others planets seems much more believable.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostSun Oct 01, 2017 7:29 pm

Attack of the Giant Leeches (1959) is another memorable one and is on YT.
B movie classic filmed at Chaplain Studios. Budget was $70K.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostMon Oct 02, 2017 2:21 pm

I remember being unexpectedly impressed by I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE the first time I saw it back in the 1970s. Interestingly enough, in those pre-internet days, it was on TV while I was talking to a film buff friend by phone and we wound up watching the whole thing together over the phone, commenting on the action as it occurred. I hope it eventually comes out on Blu-ray so I can watch it again.

Another nice little forgettable but much better-than-expected little sci-fi thriller is TOBOR THE GREAT (1954), which is obviously designed for children and teens but incorporates numerous timely topics of the era to keep the attention of adults and provide a valuable sociopolitical document for today's viewers. I just reviewed it and its new Blu-ray in the "Old Movies in HD" thread at viewtopic.php?f=4&t=3022&p=194265#p194265" target="_blank
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostMon Oct 02, 2017 3:05 pm

Christopher Jacobs wrote:I remember being unexpectedly impressed by I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE the first time I saw it back in the 1970s. Interestingly enough, in those pre-internet days, it was on TV while I was talking to a film buff friend by phone and we wound up watching the whole thing together over the phone, commenting on the action as it occurred. I hope it eventually comes out on Blu-ray so I can watch it again.


A friend and I did the next best thing a couple weeks ago and rented the hi-def Amazon Video. It's a great transfer, but since the studio's policy for opticals (fades, dissolves) was to cut in these duped elements from the heads and tails of the entire shots before and after the effect, there are unavoidably very lengthy sections - in some cases lasting minutes rather than seconds - of very noticeably lower quality. But the rest looked very, very good.
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Re: I Married A Monster From Outer Space & little sci fi gem

PostMon Oct 02, 2017 4:03 pm

Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Black Sleep, The Man without a Body, Horror of Dracula, I Married a Monster from Outer Space, Incredible Shrinking Man, The Quatermass Xperiment, Night of the Demon (Dana Andrews), Night of the Eagle (Peter Wyngarde) and Return of Dracula (movies of varied quality) are all fondly remembered by me. And I still get a kick out of them today, especially when I can introduce them to young members of my family who never had the good fortune of going to the cinema when it was fun. Return of Dracula was released in the UK as The Fantastic Disappearing Man - my younger sister disappeared into the foyer after a couple reels. She was terrified and kept sending the usherette in to persuade me to take her home!!

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