Europe in the 30s: Top 10 MIAs

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Mike Gebert

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Europe in the 30s: Top 10 MIAs

PostWed Dec 19, 2007 10:33 pm

Probably the area of film least represented on US video is European sound film of the prewar era. We have Clair and Renoir well-represented; one Pagnol set from Kino; the utterly surprising appearance of the Raymond Bernard set from Criterion/Eclipse; M and now The Threepenny Opera; some early Ingrid Bergman vehicles may be out there (they were on laser, I'm guessing they're on DVD); some one offs like Vampyr, Pepe le Moko, Drole de Drame and Gance's Beethoven film; and... that's about it. Add the Russians and you still only gain a few more titles (bless David Shepard for The Childhood of Maxim Gorky). But a critically acclaimed period, including early works by many major filmmakers, has been allowed to go MIA on video. It's a big gap in our film knowledge.

Here's my top 10 of European/Russian prewar movies I'd like to see on DVD. Will any of them turn up? It's always possible; a year ago my list would have included Bernard's Wooden Crosses, just as hopelessly.

DIE DREI VON DER TANKSTELLE (1930) German musical-comedy ("The Three From The Gas Station") with Lilian Harvey and the Comedian Harmonists, who if you've never heard of them, do so now. This one, you can actually see a clip of at YouTube; it looks a lot like Le Million or Duck Soup.
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NIEMANDSLAND (1931) Eisensteinian antiwar film in the Westfront 1918/J'Accuse vein, with score by Hanns Eisler (None But the Lonely Heart, the East German national anthem).

THE MURDERER DIMITRI KARAMASOFF (1931) Visually and aurally striking adaptation of the Dostoevsky novel.

POIL DE CAROTTE (1932) Realist film about childhood by Julien Duvivier, from an oft-filmed novel.

LA MATERNELLE (1933) Realist film about mothers-to-be, co-directed by Jean Epstein's sister.

LIEBELEI (1933) Max Ophuls set the pattern for his late French masterpieces in this tale of romance in Old Vienna.
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LIEUTENANT KIJE (1934) Long lost (though its Prokofiev score is played all the time and was used in Love and Death), this is supposed to be a lively Soviet comedy about bureaucratic bungling.

THE ETERNAL MASK (1935) World-famous Swiss film about psychoanalysis, long thought lost during the war but recently found (yet still unseen).
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THE STORY OF A CHEAT (1936) Sacha Guitry's first film is a cad's memoir, told in pantomime with narration. Incidentally, my wife and I stayed in his house in Nice. (It's a small hotel now.)
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UN CARNET DE BAL (1937) Bittersweet tale of romantic regret, again from Duvivier, a huge international hit at the time.
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“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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PostSun Apr 13, 2008 11:56 am

Two Julien Duvivier films from Arte Video last March.
DVD Beaver has a review of Au Bonheur Des Dames and states it is region 0 NTSC.
http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDRevie ... _dames.htm

This appears to be confirmed at Arte's website for Poil de Carotte as well.
http://www.arte-boutique.com/detailProd ... .id=270831
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Re: Europe in the 30s: Top 10 MIAs

PostMon Apr 14, 2008 9:07 am

Mike Gebert wrote:Probably the area of film least represented on US video is European sound film of the prewar era. We have Clair and Renoir well-represented; one Pagnol set from Kino; the utterly surprising appearance of the Raymond Bernard set from Criterion/Eclipse; M and now The Threepenny Opera; some early Ingrid Bergman vehicles may be out there (they were on laser, I'm guessing they're on DVD); some one offs like Vampyr, Pepe le Moko, Drole de Drame and Gance's Beethoven film; and... that's about it. Add the Russians and you still only gain a few more titles (bless David Shepard for The Childhood of Maxim Gorky). But a critically acclaimed period, including early works by many major filmmakers, has been allowed to go MIA on video. It's a big gap in our film knowledge.

Here's my top 10 of European/Russian prewar movies I'd like to see on DVD. Will any of them turn up? It's always possible; a year ago my list would have included Bernard's Wooden Crosses, just as hopelessly.

DIE DREI VON DER TANKSTELLE (1930) German musical-comedy ("The Three From The Gas Station") with Lilian Harvey and the Comedian Harmonists, who if you've never heard of them, do so now. This one, you can actually see a clip of at YouTube; it looks a lot like Le Million or Duck Soup.


I'd love to see this one too! I have the CH* on a German-only copy of Bomben Auf Monte Carlo with Hans Albers. Another German title I'd love to see on DVD is the original Viktor Und Viktoria.

But the pickins aren't quite as slim as you suggest. All of Lang's pre-american sound films (of which, granted, there are only 3) are available on DVD.

Pabst's sound films are well represented on VHS so, hopefully, DVD releases of Kameradschaft and various language versions of Don Quixote won't be too far behind.

And thankfully, Eisenstein's Aleksandr Nevskiy is also available.

And, of course, Hitchcock's UK films.

* - fell in love with the Comedian Harmonists with the release of the German biopic of a few years ago. In addition to tracking down all I could regarding the original artistes, I've also become a huge fan of the biopic actor Heino Ferch (Woof!) [/i]
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PostMon Jun 09, 2008 11:25 pm

The POIL DE CAROTTE that has been released in France with English subs is the 1924 silent version, not the sound version.

THE STORY OF A CHEAT is available in France on DVD with English subs, both by itself and as part of a big box of Guitry films of the 1930s.

It's not on DVD but LIEUTENANT KIJE can be downloaded from archive.org. IIRC it has English subs.
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PostTue Jun 10, 2008 6:52 am

THE ETERNAL MASK has actually been around for some time. I recall speaking to someone about 15 years ago who had it on video (albeit a dub). Still incredibly rare, though, and (from everything I've read about the title) a genuine "undiscovered" classic.

I'd love to see a DVD release of FAHRMANN MARIA. I watched my old video of this so many times, I think I scraped the image right off the tape. But the one I'd reeeeeeally like to see is the 1932 British old-dark-house comedy THARK which, alas, is lost.
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PostWed Jun 11, 2008 4:42 am

Jessie Matthews' run of thirties films seem to be available on VHS for the most part, but only the Hitchcock one is on DVD. I'd like all of them, but especially "First a Girl", "Evergreen" and "Sailing Along".
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PostWed Jun 11, 2008 6:25 am

Look on the bright side; you have TCM US....here in Britain, TCM UK is a very poor relation; we never get to see the wonders you have access to, for example that great series of Teddington-made 'Quota Quickies' late last year....unless you have a US contact to trade with. To the best of my knowledge, none of those UK-made, UK cast, for a UK market have ever been shown here on TV, which is a bit tragic. Everybody who has seen my copy of 'Father Takes A Walk' (dir. William Beaudine) has fallen in love with it...especially the rural scenes of a vanished England.
I could use some digital restoration myself...
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PostWed Jun 11, 2008 5:23 pm

Whereas here in Australia those Jessie Matthews films screen regularly on late night TV, along with lots of other 1930s-1960s British films.

Back to the original list, it seems that DIE DREI VON DER TANKSTELLE is or may have been available on DVD in Germany with English subtitles, but only as part of a 10 DVD box set of early German sound films. The standalone release does not appear to have subs. It is hard to tell from Transit's website whether the English component for the box set release is subs or dubbing and I can't find any corroborating evidence. The website says
Also the DVD box “German Movie Classics” is of high value for collectors. The limited special edition consists of ten significant German talkies such as Der blaue Engel (The Blue Angel), Die Drei von der Tankstelle (Three from the Filling Station) and Titanic. Plus 10 filmic essays by journalist Hans Günther Pflaum. A project of 'Transit Film' and the 'Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Foundation' in cooperation with the Goethe Institut. Mono, 4:3. Language options: German and English.


From the picture of the box set I can identify all but one of the titles. Apart from those mentioned there is M, CONGRESS DANCES, LACHENDE ERBEN, LA HABANERA, DER KAISER VON KALIFORNIEN and MUNCHHAUSEN. There isn't a direct order option or pricing on the website, technical details are scant and I can't find it on the usual German retailer sites (e.g. Amazon.de).

EDIT: I have subsequently discovered from a German-language site that the 10th film is AMPHYTRION and that all films in the set have English subtitles. The set appears only to be available from Transit and the Goethe Institute.
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PostSat Jun 26, 2010 10:07 pm

Well, not much progress has been made since I posted this 2 years ago, but The Story of a Cheat is coming out in the Criterion Sacha Guitry set later this month, and I recently watched Lieutenant Kije online here.

It's surprisingly reminiscent in style of Lubitsch's cartoonish early comedies, as well as of Russian absurdist satires such as Gogol's The Nose. Lieutenant Kije (or Kizhe in the version here) doesn't exist; he's a copyist's error on a set of orders. But at the same time the Tsar is furiously searching for someone who has spoiled his sleep by yelling, and the crime is pinned on Kizhe. He's exiled to Siberia, but through various twists and turns he rises to the rank of general and down again, without ever existing.

There's some whimsy in the early parts but mostly this is a tedious slog with no characters recognizable as human-- perhaps an unavoidable consequence of the Soviet system making a comedy about the aristocracy and the monarchical court; the usual love story among such folks would not have been politically correct here. Instead, the characters are by definition idiots, since they all seem to assume that Kizhe must exist because the Tsar and the bureaucracy say so, even when they're staring at empty space where he's supposed to be.

The Prokofiev music is, of course, why this film is remembered at all, so it's something of a surprise that it's so little integrated into the style of the film. The opening credits are silent (!) and the music just turns up here and there without much interaction with the action. This may have been a consequence of the fact that Soviet sound technology was pretty primitive at this point, at least wherever this was made. Much of the film (maybe all, hard to tell) is post-dubbed and all of it moves at the sleepwalking-in-molasses pace of a 1929 Hollywood talkie, which surprised me because the other early Soviet talkies I've seen-- Alexander Nevsky, of course, and the Lyubov Orlova films described here-- didn't seem particularly far behind American filmmaking of the same year. But this certainly does, for a 1934 film.

The film was said to be lost at one time and I wondered, watching it, if it had been suppressed later in the decade, insofar as the subject of a mercurial dictator issuing arbitrary orders at observable odds with reality, and punishing people for imaginary crimes, might have gotten a little touchy. But there's one comment at the IMDB from someone who remembered seeing it multiple times growing up in Cuba, so perhaps it was never lost and never suppressed. In any case, it's the sort of comedy that can only really seem fresh and appealing in contrast to much more lugubrious serious filmmaking. It may have been fresh to them, but it isn't to us.
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Einar the Lonely

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PostSat Jun 26, 2010 10:38 pm

NIEMANDSLAND (1931) Eisensteinian antiwar film in the Westfront 1918/J'Accuse vein, with score by Hanns Eisler (None But the Lonely Heart, the East German national anthem).


That wish has come true:

http://www.amazon.com/NIEMANDSLAND-No-M ... _lmf_tit_9

and a VHS:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005B6V4?tag=imdb-adbox

I have seen and rented the DVD at my Videotheque in Berlin, so I can confirm it really exists.

My choice would be: RAPT (CH 1933) by Kirsanoff, starring Dita Parlo, great sound- and music score by Arthur Honegger.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0137187/

And another film by Frank Wisbar (FÄHRMANN MARIA) called ANNA UND ELISABETH (D 1933), a dreyer-esque drama about mystical healings, which teams again Dorothea Wieck & Herta Thiele of MÄDCHEN IN UNIFORM fame...
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

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PostSat Jun 26, 2010 10:52 pm

Actually, I knew about that alleged release, and the VHS which I believe was from the same company. But I've never seen a used copy offered, and I've never seen it actually available for sale. So I've considered it nonexistent (at least as far as US viewers were concerned).
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 2:47 am

DIE DREI VON DER TANKSTELLE is available on DVD, but I don't think it has English subtitles. My DER KONGRESS TANZT DVD from the same series does not.

http://www.amazon.de/Die-Drei-Tankstelle-Lilian-Harvey/dp/B0002Y2Y62/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1277628237&sr=1-1

KAMERADSCHAFT is also available in this edition:

http://www.amazon.de/Kameradschaft-Ernst-Busch/dp/B000GG4NOW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1277628384&sr=1-1
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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 6:47 am

I've wanted to see 1932 "The Trunks of Mr. O.F." after reading this plot outline on Allmovie- and in addition it's one of Alfred Abel's sound films:

A sedentary little German town is thrown into a tizzy when several trunks show up from Cairo, Egypt, all marked "O.F." This is followed by a telegram announcing that "O.F." is arriving soon and will expect accommodations. A newspaper reporter tells everyone that the mystery man is a millionaire. In preparation for his arrival, the town goes into a frenzy of construction, building a cinema, an opera house, a casino and several other moneymaking enterprises. It turns out that the reporter has no more idea of who "O.F." is than anyone else; he was simply tired of the village's backward attitude and wanted to improve its economy. Coda: An actress named Ola Fallon vents her anger upon discovering that her staff has inadvertently sent her luggage to the wrong town. A warmhearted German satire, Trunks of Mr. O.F. was fortunately completed just before the burgeoning Nazi movement declared such films as "inessential." The film served to introduce a young ingenue by the name of Hedi Keisler, who went on to Hollywood fame and fortune as Hedy Lamarr, and was also the third film of a wide-eyed stage comedian who was born Laszlo Lowenstein, but who billed himself as Peter Lorre.
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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 7:26 am

Apart from DIE EWIGE MASKE/THE ETERNAL MASK other movies directed by Werner Hochbaum deserve to be released as well, especially MORGEN BEGINNT DAS LEBEN /LIFE BEGINS TOMORROW, RAZZIA IN ST. PAULI and SCHLEPPZUG M 17, starring and co-directed by Heinrich George.

Recently I was pretty impressed by Veit Harlan's version of DIE REISE NACH TILSIT, based upon the same Sudermann novel as SUNRISE.
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 8:03 am

I first ran across Hochbaum's name in David Shipman's The Story of Cinema-- he included him in a list of the great directors of the time, and to find a list which went "Clair, Renoir, Hochbaum" was sort of like those times on Star Trek when Kirk would rattle off a list like "Napoleon. Hitler, Lee Kiang"-- the last being a tyrant of the 22nd century.

Shipman spoke very highly of him and yet, a decade or more later, I've come no closer to seeing a single film of his. There's a lot out there, and if some of it, like Lieutenant Kije, you can understand why it didn't travel, some of it is genuinely great or near-great and we are genuinely missing out.

One exampe of 30s German commercial cinema I picked up recently is this Hans Albers (Munchausen) comedy, The Man Who Was Sherlock Holmes. Print looks good, I need to actually watch it now.
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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 8:10 am

I'd like to see properly subtitled versions of Pola Negri's talkies. I've only seen MAZURKA and it was very good, and pretty easy to follow if you've seen the Kay Francis remake- though there are some differences.
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PostSun Jun 27, 2010 10:38 am

I wouldn't rank Hochbaum with Renoir and Clair though.

European 30s belonged to France, the best work was made there.

Some stuff by Blasetti I would like to see on (subtitled) DVD:

1860, ALDEBARAN, VECCHIA GUARDIA, ETTORE FIERAMOSCA... and some of his 1940s and 1950 films as well of course.
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Europe MIA'S

PostTue Jun 29, 2010 11:47 am

I could go for more of that impudent Teddy Bear from Germany, Heinz Ruhmann.But how many others in the US would?
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PostTue Jun 29, 2010 2:12 pm

[quote="Jay Salsberg"]THE ETERNAL MASK has actually been around for some time. I recall speaking to someone about 15 years ago who had it on video (albeit a dub). Still incredibly rare, though, and (from everything I've read about the title) a genuine "undiscovered" classic.

There is a subtitled 16MM print in the Rohauer Collection. It's a little beat up, but certainly watchable. Non-English language titles seem to be a hard sell at the conventions, but I'll suggest it for Cinefest.

We also have a number of the Jessie Matthews films in 16MM (EVERGREEN, GANGWAY, IT'S LOVE AGAIN, FOREVER AND A DAY).

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Re: Europe MIA'S

PostTue Jun 29, 2010 3:15 pm

antoniod wrote:I could go for more of that impudent Teddy Bear from Germany, Heinz Ruhmann.But how many others in the US would?


Lots of his films are on DVD in Germany. No subtitles though, I guess.
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PostTue Jun 29, 2010 3:19 pm

I'd love to see more (as in one or two) foreign films of that era at the fests. I understand that people don't want to see Dreyer, and those kinds of art films have enough outlets anyway. But commercial cinema-- if you'd show a Robert Siodmak film made in Hollywood in 1942, and you'd show Sirk's Lured with George Sanders and Lucille Ball, why wouldn't you show Siodmak's French Pieges, say, which Lured is a remake of?
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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PostTue Jun 29, 2010 3:50 pm

Probably nowhere near as rare as the film under discussion, but one I'd like to see is Friedemann Bach (1941). There is an obscure dealer of VHS German films based in Indiana that has it, or at least lists it. I think it's been on DVD in Europe. My German isn't bad, but I'd certainly prefer a subbed version. I know a lot of the actual music of this Bach son and am intrigued how they made out of his particular story a Third Reich hero.

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PostWed Jun 30, 2010 1:01 pm

spadeneal wrote:Probably nowhere near as rare as the film under discussion, but one I'd like to see is Friedemann Bach (1941). There is an obscure dealer of VHS German films based in Indiana that has it, or at least lists it. I think it's been on DVD in Europe. My German isn't bad, but I'd certainly prefer a subbed version. I know a lot of the actual music of this Bach son and am intrigued how they made out of his particular story a Third Reich hero.

spadeneal


It has been released on DVD in Germany in 2005, with German subs for the hard of hearing if that helps you. I wouldn't know but it is said to be rather inaccurate from a historical pov, as most of these kind of films are. But the performance of the great Gustaf Gründgens is worth watching.

During that period there were many biopics about "great men" (including Diesel, Schlüter, Paracelsus, Bismarck, Frederick the Great) in Germany, but I must say that most of them don't come off as third-reichish as one would expect. This is particularily true for FRIEDEMANN BACH, as the main character isn't portrayed as a "titanic genius" at all (as for example Heinrich George in ANDREAS SCHLÜTER).
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PostWed Jun 30, 2010 4:13 pm

A few of Stroheim's French films would be nice as well, LES DISPARUS DE SAINT-AGIL, MACAO - L'ENFER DU JEU, ULTIMATUM (directed by Robert Wiene)...
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

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PostThu Jul 01, 2010 6:22 am

BTW

has a decent copy of VIKTOR UND VIKTORIA ever been released?
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PostThu Jul 01, 2010 7:02 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:BTW

has a decent copy of VIKTOR UND VIKTORIA ever been released?


Yes, but again in Germany only, and not subtitled...
Kaum hatte Hutter die Brücke überschritten, da ergriffen ihn die unheimlichen Gesichte, von denen er mir oft erzählt hat.

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Titles in Thread

PostFri Jul 02, 2010 11:49 am

Email Me, for Any Titles in Thread, STILL 'wanted.'
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PostFri Jul 02, 2010 5:46 pm

N_Phay wrote:Jessie Matthews' run of thirties films seem to be available on VHS for the most part, but only the Hitchcock one is on DVD. I'd like all of them, but especially "First a Girl", "Evergreen" and "Sailing Along".


TCM has run FIRST A GIRL, EVERGREEN and several other Matthews films. My guess is they will run others in time.
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German & European films

PostFri Jul 02, 2010 8:38 pm

Interesting to see this subject come up again after moreorless 2 years. I mentioned subject in a post recently. I did not know Nitrateville two years ago.

I am a collector of European films and earlier the records(a fire lost all this large LP collection). I just this week took delivery of another load of German classics that I had waited a few weeks for, a delay caused by The Stolen Jools awaiting release and it was delayed further so they decided to sent the rest of my order last week. The problem is the lack of subtitles and films often become out of print for a while awaiting repressing but it is a small market and no subtitles outside German for the hearing impaired must take its toll on sales.

I got Bomben aus Monte Carlo(poor print but sound OK), a box of Zarah Leander(I had some of these but I wanted Das Neue Ufern, To New Shores because it was set in Australia in founding colonial days), a documentary on Veit Harlan made two years ago, Blackmail(1929) in sound & original silent version, a TV series from the 1960s(a crime or Krimi series as they call them) in very nice black & white and various others. Hollywood Party was in it with access to a German dubbing but no trailer but issued by Warner Bros there.

The Veit Harlan is more than interesting to me. Harlan was the major director during the 2nd World War and had some trouble after the war wit the War Crimes Commission because he filmed Jew Suss. One of his wives was Kristina Soederbaum whose Harlan directed color film, The Goldene Stadt from that time was in the package also. Soederbaum was a Swedish actress who came to Germany & I believe either Hitler or Joe G liked her very much. Hitler did have a soft spot for the Swedish Leander & Goering had Swedish connections. The children & grand children of Harlan from his marriages are well represented in the program and talk plenty, mostly women. And this show has English subtitles.

There are three Jessie Matthews on DVD, one from France being the rarer Hitchcock musical Waltzes of Vienna which intergrates English and French prints. Hitchcock was not too successful in obliterating this film no matter what his daughter says.

There are a number of Dutch titles also from the 30s & 40s & other material but I have been trying to get these for 12 months now and no much luck. They don't have a Shopping cart so no PayPal or Card but rather an expensive method thru ING bank. I tried to contact one of the Nitrateville bloogers who works there and does festivals for help but neve had a reply. At least two had been 30s titles had been on ethnic TV here with Australian added subtitles many years ago but these films have no subtitles on DVD.

The DVDs from Editionfilmmuseuem in Germany have a shopping cart, their own productions have subtitles etc and a good postage deal and sell titles from other European archives on the side but, alas, not from Holland's archive.

There is a series of Finnish of older films also which I just found out about looking for episodes of the British TV series Heartbeat which the current recession brought to a halt. They have the earliest episodes available on DVD, with the usual music cuts which I abhor, but the two stores on-line don't export out of Finland although one said they want to get into it. I have note that both firms had the same prices for their wares unlike the Amazon/DeepDiscount competition in USA. I have another link that I have not accessed yet.

There are oodles of Italian & Greek Films which I have only seen in the local free city libraries who have good ethnic collections and no budget cuts like libraries in USA(Los Angeles area, for example). Some have subtitles in English but not many. The prints are often very good but the black & whites are the best, of course. Many Italian titles are from the pre & early war years. There is more there than just Bicycle Thieves, Paisan & Rome Open City(albeit good films all) out there in Italy.

There are also a good series of Egyptian 50s movies, some in color with Engish subtitles. These are good because they depict real life more like ours and no silly censorship of topic like other Arab regions. Then there are the Chinese titles that often have subtitles and various Chinese dialects available. Some have English dubbing. They usually use 5.1 sound.

The Indian market back to the 1950s is prolific and all seem to have subtitles, English name title at the start & a censorship certificate and up to 3 hours long with the musical numbers also available seperately & now, 5.1 sound now.

There are a few French out there but I am still awaiting the DVD of The Crime of Mon. Lange which I missed on laserdisc. I have not seen DVDs of The Baker's Wife and Paradis Perdu(Paradise Lost) which is set in a cabaret and I last saw in the mid 1970s when I had a 16mm print loaned to me by a Film Institute which had a number of French films from the French Emabassy for free for 6 months & schools only had to pay the shipping.

The film institute also had film on loan from the Goethe Institute and these included a 10-15mins TV series on Berlin(Berolina) which had much film clips. Don't know what happened to that.

Not much has happened yet with Australian's prolific film heritage as survives but am I hopeful. The 30s had people like Charles Farrell, Victor Jury, Errol Flynn, Shirley Ann Richards, John Longden, Helen Twelvetrees, Denis Hoey, Cecil Kellaway(and his family), Will Mahoney(She's My Lily) & his wife Evie Hayes from Seattle, I think or thereabouts and Peter Finch.

I have documentaries on Russian films but missing much complete because they have not been accessible to buy,

Nothing seems to have been done with the Scandinavian films that I know of except the Ingrid Bergman titles that I got on laserdisc with subtitles. I did not get the early DVD version on Image(I think) because of the cost at the time and the LDs were good quality & I hope still are but I have not played them for a longtime now.

It should be noted that some good people rustled up the French films to secret storage in many cases as the Germans wandered in to Paris otherwise... But they did make films under the German's noses. The German'as also used the Eiffel Tower to broadcast TV during the war.

It's a long subject .
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antoniod

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MIA'S

PostWed Jul 07, 2010 9:19 am

It'd also be fun to see the Swedish films of Edward Persson(an actor seen in DeMille's "Unconquered" as an Indian). There isn't even much of him on YouTube, but there's plenty of Ernst Rolf.
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