Who are you? (Formal introductions)

Comments related to the operation of NitrateVille.
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Harlett O'Dowd

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PostFri Jan 04, 2008 1:03 pm

Pathe Lehrman wrote:Okay, in for dime, in for a dollar. Tom Reeder here, writing from sunny New Jersey. ... In '63 I had the good fortune to relocate to a town mid-way between NYC and Philadelphia, which meant that I was then able to receive 11 channels, a staggering number in those pre-cable days, plus an additional 3 UHF channels out of Phila that carried pretty much nothing but Poverty Row fare - which I grew to love as well.


Where in Jersey could you get both PHL & NYC channels? Hightstown?

I grew up in Jersey (south) and only got the Philly VHS channels. Lots of pre-code MGM and paramount in the 70s (before I even knew what pre-code was!)
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Harlett O'Dowd

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PostFri Jan 04, 2008 1:50 pm

Well, I suppose netiquette demands I should say something about myself before responding to any more posters' profiles:

I'm chris Connelly (nom de web Harlett O'Dowd and if you don't know the origin of said handle, the tale requires that it be regaled - in person - over a stiiff drink, perhaps at a Cinecon in the not-too-distant future.)

I grew up in South Jersey and moved to Atlanta in 1991. By day I do tech support for Georgia Tech and by night I sing in The Atlanta Opera chorus and anywhere else they let me.

I'm also in the process of (finally) shopping around my biography of torch singer Helen Morgan (http://www.mindspring.com/~cconnelly/helen.htm) and have written articles on opera, musical theatre and film for Kino, The AO Souvenir Program and various local (Atlanta) publications.

As I noted above, I have three dogs (the third is my partner's 17-year(!) old chow-mix with the all too appropriate name of Ginger) and I've somehow managed to convert my partner to the wonders of vintage film.

I was first turned on to vintage film in the early 1970s with Fritz Lang and other German silents on our local PBS station and the aforementioned pre-codes on the local channel packages.

Favorites are Chaney/Browning, George O'Brien, Valentino, Crawford, Karl Dane, John Ford, William Haines, the DeMille sex comedies, Keaton and entirely too many to mention. I even have a soft spot for Ralph Graves - especially in silents.
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Frederica

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PostFri Jan 04, 2008 1:57 pm

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:
Frederica wrote:
James Bazen wrote:I've attended The Fall Cinesation the past five years now. I'm contemplating attending Cinefest in Syracuse this March, and I eventually hope to attend the Valhalla of conventions--- Cinecon.

James


James, if you attend Valhalla/Cinecon, I promise I'll wear my helmet with the horns. It will add a whole new dimension to "Ladies, Please Remove Your Hats."

Fred


but only if I get to bring Siegfried with me:
and Mooda when we finally get that midnight screening of GOLDEN DAWN


Fine with me! Besides the fact that I still haven't given up on the Golden Dawn singalong, I think that Cinecon should provide Reduced Price Passes for Dogs. Let's start nagging Birchard now.

Fred
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Pathe Lehrman

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PostFri Jan 04, 2008 3:40 pm

Harlett/Chris:

Hopewell, NJ is right in central NJ, a few miles from Princeton. Lots of people in town had rotor antennas, with a little motor attched to the antenna and a control box by your TV so that you could rotate the antenna from pointing towards Phila to NYC and back again, fine-tuning it for the best reception. Lindbergh, the famous aviator, built his house right outside of Hopewell so that he could receive radio transmissions from both cities.

I actually moved from outside Phila to Yardley, PA, before moving to Hopewell. In Yardley you needed a higher mast for your antenna since it was a bit farther away from NYC, but you could still get reception from both cities.

Life was simpler - or at least less expensive - back then.

Pathe
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Rob Farr

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PostSun Jan 06, 2008 5:54 am

Rob Farr here, most recently known as one of the nuts who started and help put on the Slapsticon each year. With my home just a 25-minute Metrorail ride to the Library of Congress, I've used it to do historical research and published articles in Griffithiana, Chaplin, Classic Images and some OTR journals, tho not as often as I'd like since parenthood beckoned.

In my un-reel life I run Arlington County's government cable channel, which can be best described as a local version of C-SPAN, but more fun (we try anyway). I even have a late-blooming career as a cheesy actor touting green living tips. Search Professor Robert Farr on YouTube and you'll see what I mean.

I live in Arlington VA (other side of the Potomac from DC...County slogan: "We're not just a big cemetery!") with a wonderful wife and two amazing kids, ages 7 and 10. My daughter (the 7-year-old) is showing every sign of becoming a film geek and within a year or two we should be popping up in LA, Columbus or Syracuse.
Rob Farr
"If it's not comedy, I fall asleep." - Harpo Marx
www.slapsticon.org
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Rob Farr

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PostSun Jan 06, 2008 6:19 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:I grew up in South Jersey and moved to Atlanta in 1991.


Where in South Jersey? I was born in Haddon Township and spent most of my childhood in Haddonfield. We were too far from NY to pick up all but the fuzziest reception, but got the Philly stations clearly. I still remember the first Columbia shorts package released in 1959-60 on Sally Starr's program containing, besides the Stooges, Charley Chase, Andy Clyde, El Brendel and Sterling Holloway. And also fondly remember the late 1960s screenings of classic comedies on Sunday afternoons on KYW. Channel 48 had a run in the early 1970s where they ran every W.C. Fields feature and lots of rarities like H'wood Review of 1929. Of course nothing like the wealth sprouting up on TCM and DVD every day now, but the sheer randomness of it and the fact that there was no way to record and preserve these screenings made them all the more precious.
Rob Farr
"If it's not comedy, I fall asleep." - Harpo Marx
www.slapsticon.org
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Harlett O'Dowd

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PostSun Jan 06, 2008 10:18 am

Rob Farr wrote:Where in South Jersey? I was born in Haddon Township and spent most of my childhood in Haddonfield. We were too far from NY to pick up all but the fuzziest reception, but got the Philly stations clearly. I still remember the first Columbia shorts package released in 1959-60 on Sally Starr's program containing, besides the Stooges, Charley Chase, Andy Clyde, El Brendel and Sterling Holloway. And also fondly remember the late 1960s screenings of classic comedies on Sunday afternoons on KYW. Channel 48 had a run in the early 1970s where they ran every W.C. Fields feature and lots of rarities like H'wood Review of 1929. Of course nothing like the wealth sprouting up on TCM and DVD every day now, but the sheer randomness of it and the fact that there was no way to record and preserve these screenings made them all the more precious.


Born n raised in National Park, Gloucester Catholic class of 1983 (ya'll can do the math) I have cousins in Haddonfield. They and my nephew all went to Haddon Twp.

Being a *few* years younger than you, I remember Captain Noah more than Sally Starr (but shared a dressing trailer with her - not at the same time - some years later) but agree with you that Philly programming, especially on 48 was, to put it kindly, odd.

I remember lots of theme weeks and almost all of them were from the 30s (Jeanette & Nelson, Marx bros at Paramount, Cable & Crawford) and lots of early sound films like BROADWAY MELODY (which I still think is a good film for its year) and HOLLYWOOD REVUE. They also had rather odd syndication packages. THE LUCY SHOW and no I LOVE LUCY ever. Ditto NIGHT GALLERY and no TWILIGHT ZONE. Yet they had DARK SHADOWS and SPACE GIANTS in syndication which virtually no other US market had.
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James Bazen

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PostSun Jan 06, 2008 12:46 pm

Congrats on the Helen Morgan book. How long did it take you to write it?

James
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Harlett O'Dowd

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PostMon Jan 07, 2008 1:41 pm

James Bazen wrote:Congrats on the Helen Morgan book. How long did it take you to write it?

James


Thanks, but hold the congrats. It's written but not yet sold, which of course is the tricky part.

And as Fred notes, it's always easier and more fun to run after research tangents than it is to sit down and deal with the business and writing side of things.

But to answer your question, I've been working on this since late 1990.
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James Bazen

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PostMon Jan 07, 2008 6:24 pm

Fine with me! Besides the fact that I still haven't given up on the Golden Dawn singalong, I think that Cinecon should provide Reduced Price Passes for Dogs. Let's start nagging Birchard now.

Fred


Ah, I can already envision a rousing group sing of My Bwana!
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James Bazen

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PostMon Jan 07, 2008 6:28 pm

Thanks, but hold the congrats. It's written but not yet sold, which of course is the tricky part.

And as Fred notes, it's always easier and more fun to run after research tangents than it is to sit down and deal with the business and writing side of things.

But to answer your question, I've been working on this since late 1990.


Well, at any rate congrats on the completed work and good luck to the future.
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Ray Faiola

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PostTue Jan 08, 2008 10:42 am

Ray Faiola here. Recently moved from NYC to Ellenville, NY. Been collecting film since I was 5. My first 8mm reel was ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (thanks to sister Linda!). I had a few 16mm films in the early 70's but got rid of them when I moved to Miami where I went to school, did about 40 plays and worked at a local television station. Back in New York and married, a disreputable chap named Stan Taffel gave me a spare B&H 16mm projector and that was the end. 19 years and 1,600 features later (not to mention thousands of shorts, cartoons and trailers) I had to buy 16 acres in the Catskills to house it all!

By day I am Director of Audience Services at the CBS Television Network. By night I restore classic film scores and my company, Chelsea Rialto Studios, has produced more than 3 dozen CD's of scores by Max Steiner, Alfred Newman, Dimitri Tiomkin and others, releasing through Screen Archives Entertainment. I've also produced synchronized scores to several silent comedies for new 16mm prints. Also a former Grand Sheik of the Founding Tent of the Sons of the Desert.

I have a wife, two kids, and no pets except for a chipmunk who refuses to vacate my barn!
Classic Film Scores on CD
http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com
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Tommie Hicks

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PostFri Jan 11, 2008 3:03 am

I am Tommie Hicks and I am a full time student in my dottage. This fall I will be attending Ohio University persuing two master's degrees, one in History and the other in Library Science, with a goal of working at the LOC.

In 1971 when I was 10 I recieved a Thunderbird toy projector and several silent comedies and I became hooked. Shortly after I watched FOUR CLOWNS on the big screen and the deal was sealed.

About 1999 I first entered the internet and found a site called Google A.M.S. and learned more than I ever could in all the libraries in the world. However that wonderful site has become a scorched battlefield. I sincerely hope that all of the good learned people who left that site come here and post in peace.

Although Silent Comedy is my greatest love, I do like Fairbanks, Chaney, and Houdini (I know he's a ham, but he is magnificent).
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Joe Thompson

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PostFri Jan 11, 2008 11:06 pm

My name is Joe Thompson. I've been a dedicated lurker at alt.movies.silent. I hope to be more active on this cool group.

I'm a native of San Francisco and I used to go to the movies a lot before we had the kid and the mortgage ;0). Now I depend on TCM and dvds. I was lucky when I was in high school and college that we had the Avenue Photoplay Society, which presented silents every Friday night, usually accompanied by Bob Vaughn on the Mighty Wurlitzer. I am also fortunate that my wife and daughter love movies, too.

I like most kinds of films, but I'm especially partial to comedy. and I'm always interested in obsolete technology.

Aside from movies, I'm a student of San Francisco history and a big transit fan. Cable cars are my specialty. I recently posted a 1907 newspaper article about what may have been the world premiere of a movie shot from the front of a cable car going down Market Street before the 1906 earthquake and fire:
http://www.cable-car-guy.com/html/ccatdms.html
Regards,
Joe Thompson ;0)
http://bigvriotsquad.blogspot.com/
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Tommie Hicks

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PostSat Jan 12, 2008 2:55 am

When I lived in the Bay area in the early 80's, the cable cars were shut down for a complete overhaul and I never did get my Rice-A-Roni minute.
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Rob Farr

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PostSat Jan 12, 2008 6:09 am

Tommie was also head of a Sons of the Desert tent in Denver CO and three decades after the fact we were chatting and realized we were both in attendance at a screening of Laurel & Hardy's Our Relations at the Englewood CO Public Library. I think it was so memorable because I have never seen a crowd so enthralled by a L&H movie. During the "cement overshoes" finale the audience was literally screaming.

Good luck with the Masters, Tommie. IMO you'd be a shoe-in for a job at LOC, especially if you are willing to move to Culpeper. I had business on the campus of American University yesterday and was overcome with the feeling that, "I wanna go back to school!"
Rob Farr
"If it's not comedy, I fall asleep." - Harpo Marx
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Mike Gebert

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PostSat Jan 12, 2008 8:33 am

It's funny how seminal those showings could be-- when I was about 12, there was one night they had a special triple bill of Animal Crackers, Monkey Business and My Little Chickadee at the Crest Theater in Wichita. Years later, if I talked to anyone about film very long, I'd ask if they remembered that show-- and nearly always, they were there too. Practically everybpdy I knew in Wichita in my 20s had been there that night.
“Sentimentality is when it doesn't come off—when it does, you get a true expression of life's sorrows.” —Alain-Fournier
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Derek B.

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PostSat Jan 12, 2008 2:56 pm

My name is Derek Boothroyd and I am a biostatistician at Stanford University and also do some work with the VA. I have generally been a lurker at a.m.s and probably will be the same here, as I have been so far, but do hope to participate some.

I have only been particularly interested in silents for about 10 years but am lucky in having had access to the Stanford library collection for silent videos (particularly helpful when I needed breaks from my graduate research) in addition to film showings at The Stanford Theatre, the PFA, The SF Silent Film Festival, and Niles in the Bay Area. I've attended Cinecon the last three years.

- Derek B.
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Joe Thompson

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PostSat Jan 12, 2008 11:28 pm

Tommie Hicks wrote:When I lived in the Bay area in the early 80's, the cable cars were shut down for a complete overhaul and I never did get my Rice-A-Roni minute.


When you finish your two Masters degrees (very impressive) and get a vacation from the LOC, come for the San Francisco Silent Film Festival. They abandoned the cable that went by the Castro Theater in 1941 but the Powell and California Street cars are doing great right now.
Regards,
Joe Thompson ;0)
http://bigvriotsquad.blogspot.com/
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greta de groat

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PostFri Jan 25, 2008 11:45 pm

I just noticed this thread (i'm still learning to navigate here) Most of you probably know me already, but i see a few names i don't recognize, so here goes:

I, too, use my real name to post. I grew up in the 60s watching Buster & Laurel & Hardy and the Marx Brothers on TV (which set my bar for comedy very high), but i really got into silents in my teen years after borrowing a copy of Blum's Pictorial History of the Silent Screen from the library and becoming fascinated with all the wonderful faces. I watched The Toy that Grew Up and Silents Please on TV, and I think my first silent in a theater was James Card coming to PFA with a free screening of Sadie Thompson, minus the last reel, to dramatize the need for preservation (The next silent i saw was The Unknown and Lonesome, both with only French intertitles and a student struggling to translate them on the fly)

I have a website, Unsung Divas of the Silent Screen (http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat/ ) about silent dramatic actresses, and have subsidiary websites on Norma Talmadge, Clara Kimball Young, Alice Joyce, and Pauline Frederick, and continue to research these ladies. But most of my copious free time lately is spent volunteering at the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, where i am trying to get their library and database in shape. Hopefully i can occasionally watch a film, too! In my mundane life, i'm a librarian at Stanford University, where i catalog a lot of videos (and try to get the silents directed to me!), and also catalog a lot of other weird stuff nobody wants to deal with (including, today, two large rubber rats. With read eyes. And they squeak when you squeeze them!). My husband of 30 years and i are also big opera fans. I'm currently engaged in a project to digitize my 78 collection.

Can't think of anything else to say at this point. Besides, i've got a pile of David Shepard's sheet music here to catalog.

Glad to all be back together again!

cheers
greta
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William D. Ferry

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PostSat Feb 02, 2008 5:11 pm

Hi Folks!

Bill Ferry, here. So glad to see many familiar names (and faces) from the A.M.S. newsgroup. Some of you may know me as the fellow with the bad puns. :roll:

Anyway, some biographical info: lifelong NJ resident (49 years and counting), introduced to this wonderful art form via Charlie Chaplin Theater on WOR-TV at the age of 5, and repeated exposure to Robert Youngson's films on the Million Dollar Movie. In the seventies, I discovered the joys of the Blackhawk catalogue (customer #0191462!)

For us, this is truly the best of times. I'm happy to have a job I love that lets me keep Kino and Warner Home Video in business!

I still post periodically on AMS, and have recently branched out to Jeff Cohen's wonderful blog VITAPHONE VARIETIES.

I'm looking forward to visiting with my old comrades and making new friends here as well!
Yours for bigger and better silents,

William D. Ferry
(Blackhawk Customer #0191462)
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silentfilm

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PostSat Feb 02, 2008 5:50 pm

I thought that I was the only person who could still remember their Blackhawk number! I memorized mine as a teen -- 0163514. Back then it was cool to be a number in their system, but we've learned a lot about computers since then!
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Jerfilm

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PostMon Feb 04, 2008 9:35 am

Well, Geezer Status is no longer in question. I'm Jerry Rutledge, just turned 72 a week ago. Lifelong resident of Waseca, MN - was CEO of a small property and casualty insurance company for 40 years. 3 grown kids scattered to the winds, first wife died of Alzheimer's- happily remarried a gal I met onthe internet (whole n'other story). Spend summers in Estes Park, CO, winters presently in Palm Springs and store our stuff back in Minnesota.

At age 10, got turned on to silents first in 1946 when one of the picture magazines (can't for the life of me remember which one) did a huge picture story on the 20th anniversary of Rudy's death. I looked at those photos again and again and remember thinking, you have to be rich to collect films and I'll never see any of these in a theater.....sob.....luckily how wrong I was.

So instead I started collecting old 78s from the beginning to about 1930. Dime a dozen. We had a player piano at a motel we owned in Colorado and I started buying piano rolls at auctions as well. My mom got me started loving classical music and one of my hobbies today is collecting recordings of rare music from obscure composers, particularly 19th and early 20th century. Recent years have brought a plethora of wonderful recordings, kinda like we've seen in silents on DVDs. In recent years I've also become fascinated with the work done by several folks in converting reproducing piano rolls into MIDI files that can be played on any MIDI piano or keyboard. You can now have Rachmaninoff, Grieg, Ravel, Joplin, Waller, etc, etc, playing piano in your living room - not a tinny old acoustic recording, but on a real piano......what a wonderful age we live in.
I do play myself, but only for Linda and me. Favorite pops composer is probably Harry Warren. And the Gershwins. And Harold......

I ramble. Sorry about that. Despite my frequent absences, I currently chair the Waseca County Historical Society.

I can't list favorites- there are just too many. I do especially like the early DeMille films. Despite what many think of Cecil, he knew how to make a good movie.

Shut it off, Jer........
Jerry
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Arndt

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Intro

PostThu Feb 07, 2008 1:25 pm

Somehow my text has disappeared here and I cannot seem to re-enter it. Very frustrating. I'll put in a new post further down the line.
Last edited by Arndt on Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:09 am, edited 3 times in total.
MELIOR
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Thomas

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PostFri Feb 08, 2008 5:33 am

Hello everyone!
I'm Thomas Boehnke from Munich, Germany, and, how you could imagine, a silent movie aficionado. My interests in silent cinema are wide spreaded. Generally I'm interested in silent films of every country. I made a website about the history of latin american silent cinema, because there's a lack of information about this topic, even in Latin America. Unfortunately for the majority of this forum's users the side is only in german.
In my silent movie collection I haven't only DVDs. I like the old-fashioned style, so I have movies in 8mm, Super 8, 9.5mm and 16mm, too.
I'm hoping to have a nice communication with all of you, like we're all sharing the same passion.
So long,
Thomas
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knut

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PostFri Feb 08, 2008 2:42 pm

Hello,
let's continue with guys from Germany. :D

I'm Knut Lickert and I'm living near Stuttgart in the South-West of Germany. I saw my first silent movies with live music during a silent movie festival in 1997 and I loved it. Since then I'm looking for film concerts and festivals.

Beside silent movies I'm interested in internet and I started my own homepage about silent movies: http://www.stummfilm.info (there's also some parts in English ;: ). In meantime the site gets also a Blog (sorry, only German ;) ).

Knut
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urbanora

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PostSat Feb 09, 2008 1:11 pm

My turn. I'm Luke McKernan, resident in Rochester UK, aged 46. I work as Curator, Moving Image at the British Library. Previously I've toiled away the British Universities Film & Video Council as its Head of Information, and before that as a cataloguer at the BFI's National Film and Television Archive, where I first stumbled upon silents.

My interest tends towards non-fiction film, early cinema and Victorian (pre-1901) cinema. I run the Bioscope blog (http://bioscopic.wordpress.com) and Who's Who of Victorian Cinema (http://www.victorian-cinema.net), which I co-manage with Stephen Herbert. I also run Charles Urban, Motion Picture Pioneer, http://www.charlesurban.com, whose subject (early non-fiction producer and entrepreneur behind Kinemacolor) is the source of my nom de plume and avatar.

The rest you can find out from http://www.lukemckernan.com.
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Jim Roots

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PostThu Feb 21, 2008 8:43 am

Mike Gebert wrote:It's funny how seminal those showings could be-- when I was about 12, there was one night they had a special triple bill of Animal Crackers, Monkey Business and My Little Chickadee at the Crest Theater in Wichita. Years later, if I talked to anyone about film very long, I'd ask if they remembered that show-- and nearly always, they were there too. Practically everybpdy I knew in Wichita in my 20s had been there that night.


And then they all went to the Woodstock music festival right afterwards!


Jim
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Mike O'Wave

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PostSat Feb 23, 2008 1:06 am

It all started when I saw a list of all the Academy award winning movies on Netflix a couple of years ago and thought, "Wouldn't it be interesting to watch them all in chronological order and get a sense of the development of cinema through the years?"

Then I thought some more of the movies that have won awards in my own lifetime and realized how weighted the selections would be on the "grand epic" side and thought that this was probably not the best way to get a flavor of the movies through the ages. Then I thought, "What are the oldest movies on DVD available to rent and came across titles like Landmarks of Early Film, Edison- The Invention of the Movies and some Melies disks.

I graduated from college in 1986, but have often thought of taking some extra classes just to further my education and learn about some random subject. I play piano for a living and am surrounded by college students that frequently amaze me with how little they are learning in their classes. The idea had hit me a few years ago that I could probably learn as much or more than in a college class just by reading some textbooks myself and supplementing with the internet.

Here at last was the subject to test the idea on...I decided I would teach myself film history. I read some reviews on Amazon and ordered David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson's Film History: An Introduction, Mast and Kawin's A Short History of the Movies, DK's Cinema Year by Year and Robert Sklar's Movie-Made America. I ordered the Edison DVD set, joined Blockbuster.com since Netflix didn't carry The Movies Begin or Treasures from American Film Archives and some others and off I went.

Soon I was thrilling to Serpentine dances, Garden Hose tricks, Ladies in long dresses with ridiculous hats, Cockfights, Trips to the Moon, Train Robberies, Disembodied heads creating music scores, Half naked strongmen, Grasshopper cameramen, Annie Oakley, Buffalo Bill, Rover, Sneezing Fred, and an English chap who didn't want to be photographed so much he ate the camera.

I watched chronologically through 1913, but then decided to beef up my collection of movies from Grapevine, Unknown, DFI and others not part of the major online rental companies. Plus there were many more to see on the internet through LOC and others. When I saw that there was to be a giant Melies box coming in March, I decided to start over and incorporate that and the others I've added to my collection. I've also beefed up my early cinema library and have read probably 40 or 50 books on the subject so far, usually agreeing within 5% with Bruce Calvert's Amazon reviews.

So that is the unusual spot I stand on, having seen hours of silent film, but only one Chaplin (the Rounders) and no Fairbanks, Gaynor, Garbo, Brookes, DeMille, Valentino, Keaton, Lloyd or Chaney. I have a lot to look forward to!

--Michael
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larrys66diner

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PostWed Feb 27, 2008 10:26 am

Hi, I was looking for an introductory thread and finally found it! :D

I am Larry and I live in a small rural community just south of Hannibal, Missouri (which of course is the claim to fame for writer/humorist/novelist Mark Twain, as well as the Unsinkable Molly Brown). I am currently currently going on my 20th year of marriage.

I was raised in Hannibal; spent much of the decade of the 1990s living in Oklahoma City along Historic Route 66; then returned to the Hannibal area.

I had been exposed to classic films periodically throughout my childhood, but never thought much of them. Then, a 1980s NBC detective series, Remington Steele gave me further exposure, as the series' detective used references to classic movies to solve crime cases. These references intrigued me quite a bit, and I remembered thinking "There must be something interesting about these old movies"; so I began watching them, then became hooked. Later on, silents became interesting to me, initially for their historical content; shortly after, I became completely "hooked" on silents. Now I prefer silents over any other movie! My special area of interest is the late 1800s (the dawn of moving pictures) to the 1940s.

I just returned from my annual trip to the Kansas Silent Film Festival (as you noticed by the wonderful pictures I previously posted). I try to attend yearly, although I missed going in 2007. People in my area are just appalled at the idea of watching silent films. I've been asked, "You mean to tell me you sit in a theater all day, watching black & white movies with NO sound?!" When I proudly state that I do, I've been told "You're weird!!!" :lol: Perhaps I am, but proudly!

I currently am the Administrator of my own website, Larry's 66 Diner, which is approaching its two-year anniversary this coming Sunday MAR 2. I founded the site based on my two main loves: Silent & Classic Movies and Historic Route 66. However, over the past two years, we've become more of a social forum, straying slightly from the main topics (but still having that focus), where we discuss recipes, play games, give advice etc — just like being in an actual roadside Diner of the earlier by-gone era.

Although I DO like silent comedy, I prefer the dramatic efforts of DW Griffith, as well as others. My favorite silent comedians are Charley Chase and Harold Lloyd (yes, I've hit burn-out long ago on Charlie Chaplin! :wink: ). A couple other favorites are Marie Dressler, Dorothy and Lillian Gish, and Mary Pickford.

I have too many other silent favorites to name, but the most intriguing one of all is young miss Gladys Egan. I have had an on-going quest for her for 2-3 years! She was a young "starlet" (comparable to today's Dakota Fanning?) who had great talent which was never unleashed. Her best performance, which featured her prominently, IMO was in In the Border States (1911) a DW Griffith short about the Civil War. She was with the Biograph Company from 1908-1914 then she suddenly disappeared (along with another child actress of the day, Adele deGarde), when Griffith pulled up stakes and moved his company to the West Coast. My hunch was that she either abandoned her potential career, or the decision was made for her by her parents, and she perhaps grew up to be someone's grandmother with a lost and forgotten photograph in an old trunk in someone's attic. :cry: Perhaps one day, someone will speak up and say "This was my great-grandmother. She was in the first moving pictures!" IMDB.com has no statistics on her, aside from her filmography, and other resources seem to be coming up with loose ends, as well. :cry:

I am glad to have found this fascinating site!
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