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Mabel Normand on Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:03 pm
by JFK

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:40 pm
by Mike Gebert
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I'm not big on Wallace Beery as a sound star, even if I admit he can be highly effective (The Champ works you over, no question), but 2017 has turned out to be a great year for Wallace Beery the silent villain, with Behind the Door and now William Wellman's crackling, gritty hobo tale Beggars of Life, which will be out from Kino on August 22, while Thomas Gladysz's informative monograph is already available. (Listen for more about both on NitrateVille Radio shortly.) There's kind of no way to salute him in that without also showing Richard Arlen and Louise Brooks, even though both have been on the masthead before—but I think Beery dominates, as he always did.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:39 am
by boblipton
Well, you could have gone for a shot of him as Sweedie, but this is good too.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 10:15 pm
by Hamilton's Grandson
Another good one would also be Slugger Rourke, the character he played in Dynamite Smith 1924. Although a lost film, many stills are still out there.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:19 am
by silentfilm
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Here he is (out of his baseball uniform) in Casey at the Bat (1927).

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:19 pm
by Mike Gebert
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Jerry Lewis died today at 91. Lots of people will make jokes about the French loving him. You know where else they loved him? 1950s and 1960s America; Lewis or Martin & Lewis were on the top ten moneymakers poll of theater owners every year but one from 1951 to 1963. So enough with the jokes, we're talking serious comedy here.


Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:27 pm
by Mike Gebert
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NitrateVillains Bob Furmanek and Jack Theakston of 3-D Film Archive are being feted with a 3-D series at the Museum of Modern Art starting September 1st, as you know if you've heard the latest NitrateVille Radio. They've also released about a dozen 3-D releases on blu-ray—including the one on the masthead this month.

So here's the cast of It Came From Outer Space (Barbara Rush, Richard Carlson, Charles Drake and Kathleen Hughes) reacting to a giant NitrateVille logo which, if you happen to have red-blue glasses handy, will indeed pop from the screen, inducing terror in all who see it. (Don't have the glasses? I recommend this 3-D glasses supplier, who I used for a 3-D promo some years ago, as well as getting my solar eclipse shades from them recently.)

That said, I should point out that red-blue is anaglyphic 3-D, and the restorations by 3-D Film Archive are all in the superior polarized 3-D process, which allows for full color and a more convincingly effect generally. (But you've listened to the podcast, so you already know that...)

This one might be a little hard to look at for a whole month, so I may switch it to "flat" after a week or so. But it will live forever here.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:26 am
by boblipton
No matter how often I see that shot, or ones like it, I think that Glen Manning has grown so immense that his clothes have split and his nether regions are exposed.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:07 am
by silentfilm
This is the best masthead yet! Keep the 3-D version.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 2:40 pm
by Brooksie
Wow, it works! 8)

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:57 pm
by Mike Gebert
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News comes from Los Angeles' Xanadu that Citizen Hef, Hugh M. Hefner, died today at age 91.

There will be plenty of talk, no doubt heated as all things are today, about the impact of the man and the lifestyle magazine with which he changed the world for better and worse. But one thing only those in our little world knew was that he was a fan of silent film, someone who looked back fondly at a world he himself helped make antique. And that as a result, he was an unusually generous supporter of silent and classic film preservation efforts. The Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive at USC—whose director, Dino Everett, has posted here—is one sign. Another is a famous film starring Louise Brooks:

A major funder of the restoration, Hugh Hefner is also a big movie fan and has long been a magnanimous supporter of Hollywood cinema and its preservation. In 1980, he rallied Los Angeles around the battered Hollywood sign, donating and raising money for its restoration. (For his efforts, Hefner earned a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.) He endowed a chair for the Study of American Film at USC’s School of Cinema-Television and provided funds to establish the UCLA American Cinema Program dedicated to the preservation and exhibition of classic Hollywood movies. His personal interest in crooner Al Bowlly led to the preservation of films featuring the under-appreciated singer. He also executive-produced several Turner Classic Movies programs about silent stars, Louise Brooks among them, and helped fund the preservation of the Warner Brothers Vitaphone shorts (“Vitaphone Vaudeville” played at the 2007 Silent Film Festival). The Hugh Hefner Foundation website says that silent films are the usual fare one night a week in the Hefner home screening room.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:56 am
by Donald Binks
Mike Gebert wrote: His personal interest in crooner Al Bowlly led to the preservation of films featuring the under-appreciated singer.


I had no idea he was interested in Al Bowlly. One learns something new every day. Good on the old roue! We need more wonderful benefactors such as he.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:08 am
by boblipton
The earliest reference I can find to Mr. Hefner in print -- since I don't go searching old census records -- was in an old copy of Weird Tales I owned when I collected sf *& fantasy magazines. In, I believe, the January 1943 issue, the Weird Tales Club listed a Hubert Hefner in Chicago interested in meeting other fans of the genre.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:18 pm
by Mike Gebert
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Well, just as the celebration of parts of Mr. Hefner's legacy is heating up with condemnation, we turn from his career to a more innocent age when women were sweet and demure...

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Okay, maybe not. It is fitting that the 100th anniversary of Theda Bara's most lavish (but, sadly, also most famously lost) film, Cleopatra, released October 14, 1917, should fall just in time to remind us that sex has always sold and there is nothing new under the sun. Here's what survives of it:


Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:35 pm
by JFK

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 4:58 am
by boblipton
Just what I was thinking when I saw the picture of Miss Goodman at the top of the page.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 3:35 pm
by Mike Gebert
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Chris Jacobs memorial thread.

Please discuss this there, so we keep the memorial posts in one place. Thanks.