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Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:00 pm
by Mike Gebert
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Per the discussion above, I wanted to note the Fox retrospective at MOMA discussed here, but none of the other suggestions seemed to really fit the films being shown, so I decided to honor the film that's been the most talked-about Fox rediscovery of the last few months, William K. Howard's 1931 Transatlantic, featuring Edmund Lowe and Greta Nissen in this image. I interviewed Dave Kehr about the series recently, so watch for that on NitrateVille Radio shortly.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 4:45 am
by boblipton
Once again, my bad-facial-recognition abilities made me wonder what Al Pacino was doing back then.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 9:07 am
by Donald Binks
boblipton wrote:Once again, my bad-facial-recognition abilities made me wonder what Al Pacino was doing back then.

Bob


(Passes glasses to Bob) "Here, try these for size Uncle Bob!"
:)

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 10:09 am
by boblipton
Donald Binks wrote:
boblipton wrote:Once again, my bad-facial-recognition abilities made me wonder what Al Pacino was doing back then.

Bob


(Passes glasses to Bob) "Here, try these for size Uncle Bob!"
:)


recoils in horror “You wish me to see the world as it truly is? What horrors you would inflict on me!”

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 12:15 pm
by Jim Roots
Looks a LOT more like Kevin Kline than Al Pacino. Even looks like Robert de Niro in his little-moustache period. And his companion could be Uma Thurman.

Jim
(Wait a minute, are these my reading glasses or my distance glasses?)

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 5:27 pm
by Dean Thompson
I needed my reading glasses, too: for a second there I thought it was Ronald Colman and Ann Harding. Still have to catch them in Condemned!

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 7:10 pm
by Mike Gebert
So no big Edmund Lowe fans, huh? He's someone who seems to have become a star just because he could be very dapper, but he's not very memorable as a performer. To be honest, Transatlantic's newfound fame is probably his only chance for the masthead!

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 7:59 pm
by silentfilm
Image
Well, he was in that What Price Glory? (1927) film, which does have a pretty good reputation.

Image
He played character parts long into the sound era, such as one of the guilty-looking suspects in Dangerous Blondes (1943).

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 8:24 pm
by Donald Binks
He was good foil to Victor McLaglen and got a good following in the pictures they made together. I just think that when the talkies came, there were too many men who could look dapper, and he just fell by the wayside. He was quite good in all he did, but had nothing really that stood him out from the crowd.

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 5:17 am
by Jim Roots
Donald Binks wrote:He was good foil to Victor McLaglen and got a good following in the pictures they made together. I just think that when the talkies came, there were too many men who could look dapper, and he just fell by the wayside. He was quite good in all he did, but had nothing really that stood him out from the crowd.


Right, I agree. He shows up in an awful lot of films from the classic era, and almost always does a good job, but he is completely unmemorable. He had no distinctive features.

There was a period in the 1990s when every young male actor was named either Jason or Matthew, and every Jason looked alike, and every Matthew looked alike. In the same way, every actor in the 1930s looked like either Edmund Lowe or Ronald Colman, depending on whether they had a moustache or not.

Jim

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 8:42 am
by boblipton
Lowe was capable and, in the hands of a strong director, could give a fine performance. He did have a tendency to ham it up, though. Sometimes this could be used to a movie's advantage -- Mad Holiday (1936) has him and Elissa Land at Metro making fun of The Thin Man under George Seitz, and it's a hoot. Put him in a top hat, though, and I want to dump ice in the blender to make snowballs to throw at him.

As for Miss Nissen, she was another also-ran in the "We got a Garbo too!" competition. Nothing wrong with her, but there's really only one Greta.

Bob

Re: Gallery of Mastheads

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2018 1:20 pm
by CoffeeDan
The first time I ever saw Edmund Lowe in a movie -- I think it may have been DINNER AT EIGHT -- he reminded me of Fearless Fosdick from the L'il Abner comic strip, and I've never quite shaken that association. I do like him in a debonair but slightly seedy performance like BLACK SHEEP or GUILTY AS HELL, where he carelessly flicks his cigarette ash on a corpse.