PRESERVE WHAT?

Talk about the work of collecting, restoring and preserving our film heritage here.
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Frederica

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostMon Dec 29, 2014 3:22 pm

It's a big studio release, but I'd really like to see a restoration on A Kiss For Cinderella. I don't know if that's possible, though, given what I've heard about the surviving materials.
Fred
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oldposterho

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostMon Dec 29, 2014 4:21 pm

Ooh, definitely second A Kiss for Cinderella. Such an interesting film, not to mention the Barrie provenance. The dodgy elements might make an even stronger case for preservation, imho. Be a shame if the new copyright 'protection' would make getting this rebuilt harder.

--Peter
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Richard Finegan

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 4:16 am

Harold Aherne wrote:I Take This Woman (1931, Paramount)
stars Gary Cooper, Carole Lombard
Apparently sold out of the Paramount library, marked "not viewed" in the AFI Catalogue. There was, I believe, one screening somewhere a number of years ago, but this title should be archivally preserved if it hasn't been already.
-HA


I TAKE THIS WOMAN (1931) was shown on Monday, June 25, 2001 at The Film Forum in NY as part of a Pre-Code series. I saw it there, double-billed with ALL OF ME (1934). But I haven't seen it since!

Here's more info on some other screenings and why the film has been hard to find, and where the lone print was found:

http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/45444.html
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johnboles

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 12:09 pm

I agree that something should really be done with all the Billie Dove and Laura La Plante (both very important actresses) features that survive from the late 1920s.. and apparently have still not been preserved.


Prince Saliano wrote:Silents? THE LAST WARNING (1929), SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (1929); THE SORROWS OF SATAN (1926); THE BAT (1926), the surviving films of Laura La Plante and Billie Dove should all be available on DVD or available to Turner Classic Movies (also any surviving silent serials).

Talkies? I'm interested in Carl Laemmle-era titles from Universal because they are so hard to find. Fay Wray appeared in three 1934 releases...MADAME SPY, THE COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO and CHEATING CHEATERS. Have they been seen anywhere in the last 80 years?
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johnboles

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 12:11 pm

It's a shame that "The Green Goddess" 1923 didn't go to LOC as well. Knowing how stingy UCLA is, I don't expect they will ever release their copy of the film...

bobfells wrote:THE GREEN GODDESS (1923) has been restored by UCLA and even "re-premiered" in 1997 but it is not on home video. Perhaps you are referring to the preservation aspect only w/o regard to circulation.

LOC has preserved another Arliss silent, THE DEVIL (1921) that I have viewed and indeed has been posted on Youtube. But an official DVD release (perhaps paired with GREEN GODDESS) would be significant. Larry Smith told me he may bring out THE DEVIL on his own (he donated the sole surviving print to LOC) but so far not much has happened that I can see.

One more Arliss silent, $20 A WEEK (1924), sometimes written as 20 DOLLARS A WEEK, is also at the LOC.
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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 12:16 pm

If anyone has the audio available for REDSKIN or LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS and can send me a copy I will happily synchronize the sound and upload the films on the Internet Archive. I have a mute copy of LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS and the DVD of REDSKIN.


vitaphone wrote:Milefilms suggestion of LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS has merit. The Library of Congress has Vitaphone disks for reels 3, 6, 8, and 9 and I have previously lost disks for reels 4, 5, 8 and 10. Expanding the soundtrack for REDSKIN is another possibillity. That 1929 Richard Dix silent was restored with then-known Vitaphone soundtrack disks for just three reels: 1, 3 and 9. I have since acquired disks for reels 2, 3, 5, and 7 and another collector has disks for reels 2, 4, 5 and 7 and 8. So that means just the disk for reel 6 is missing.
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Frederica

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 3:24 pm

Since we're asking...Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Drew.
Fred
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Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
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Bor Enots

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Dec 31, 2014 8:08 pm

First, UCLA is not stingy... they are broke. They have never had much of an operating budget. When something is preserved it is because somebody donates money to have it done.

Second, isn't REDSKIN still under copyright?

Last, but never last. Absolutely MR. & MRS. SIDNEY DREW. Have a few up in the lab right now. THE PROFESSIONAL SCAPEGOAT is one of my all time favorite silent comedies. He and they (both Mrs. Drews) were fantastic!!!
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boblipton

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 01, 2015 7:26 am

Frederica wrote:Since we're asking...Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Drew.



How thoughtless we are that you are the first to say this!

Bob
If no one listens, then it’s just as well. At least I won’t get caught in any lies I tell.
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Wm. Charles Morrow

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 01, 2015 6:42 pm

Getting back to W.C. Fields for a moment, I’m a little surprised that It’s the Old Army Game hasn’t received more attention, restoration-wise, what with Louise Brooks prominent in the cast and all. I first saw this film at the Museum of the Moving Image along about 1990. We were told beforehand that the film was in the process of being restored, and what we were about to see was a work in progress. For much of the way it looked quite good, clean and sharp, and then suddenly the projectionist switched to a scratched, yellowed 16mm print for the last portion. (In retrospect, that was a pretty good demonstration of what, exactly, film preservationists do.) I saw it again at Film Forum a few years ago, but the print didn’t look so good on that occasion, and there were projection problems due to torn sprockets. More recently still, I watched part of it on YouTube, in what appeared to be slow motion.

I have to wonder why this film doesn’t seem to be available in a better edition. Are there rights issues?
-- Charlie Morrow
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BenModel

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 01, 2015 9:11 pm

It's a Paramount.

If you see a silent feature made after 1922 and it starts with that logo of a mountain and a ring of stars (and the film isn't "Wings") it's probably not going to wind up on video. Fortunately, a few of the von Sternbergs made it to DVD via Criterion recently, though.

Ben
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Frederica

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 02, 2015 11:32 am

boblipton wrote:
Frederica wrote:Since we're asking...Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Drew.


How thoughtless we are that you are the first to say this!

Bob


See how you are?

Rob, will these preserved films be released on dvd, or made available for theatrical showings? Would they be available for someone who wants to (like Ed's Enchantment project) do a kickstarter and produce a dvd?

I guess what I'm asking is, what will the final result of this effort be?
Fred
"Screw the men. I've got the horse."
Helen B. (Penny) Chenery
http://www.nitanaldi.com"
http://www.facebook.com/NitaNaldiSilentVamp"
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Jim Reid

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostSat Jan 03, 2015 12:11 pm

Do you know if original elements exist for the '32 The Animal Kingdom? This would be a great candidate for restoration. All copies around seem to be pretty bad.
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Coco

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostSat Jan 03, 2015 1:31 pm

Anything with Victor Moore, Billie Reeves, Gene Gauntier, Jack Bonavita, or Kathlyn Williams.

Tangled Lives: A Strange Culmination of the Seminole Indian War, Kalem, 1910
Further Adventures of the Girl Spy, Kalem, 1910
Automobile Races at Ormond, Florida, American Mutoscope Biograph Co., 1905
Classmates, Richard Barthelmess, 1924
Black Is White, Thomas Ince Corp, 1919
A Mission of State - Chapter of the Grant Police Reporter Serial, Kalem, 1916
Isle of Destiny, Character Pictures, 1920
Sleepy Sam the Sleuth, Richard Norman Studios, 1915
A Daughter of Dixie, Champion Film Co., 1911
Tide of Battle, Kalem, 1912
His Conscience, His Guide, Florida Film Co., 1919
Down Upon the Suwannee River, Royal Palm Prods, 1925
Poppy, Selznick Pictures, 1917
The Woman God Changed, Seena Owen, Cosmopolitan Pictures, 1921
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milefilms

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostSat Jan 03, 2015 2:42 pm

Bor Enots wrote:Second, isn't REDSKIN still under copyright?


Redskin and Lady of the Pavements are both copyrighted.
Dennis Doros
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maliejandra

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostTue Jan 06, 2015 5:11 pm

I agree about Pola Negri. Some of her films are available but you really have to search among collectors and there are too many of her films unavailable to us English speakers due to the necessity of translating the subtitles.

I would also nominate Clara Bow's films for preservation and restoration. We always hear about how important she was as a symbol of the Jazz Age but so few of her films are available and many are in various states of decomposition.

Marion Davies deserves more attention too.
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FrankFay

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 08, 2015 2:03 pm

oldposterho wrote:I'd like to see NY Met opera star Geraldine Farrar's films preserved. Notably: A World And Its Woman, since it would offer an interesting take on US views towards the 1917 Russian revolution. Maria Rosa, Joan the Woman, Woman God Forgot, Flame of the Desert, Woman and the Puppet would also be of interest. Since her career only spanned a few years at the end of the teens and are now public domain, these would seem to be good candidates.



A 35mm print of THE WOMAN AND THE PUPPET was screened some years back in Syracuse NY for Cinefest- it was a stunningly beautiful print & I don't think the film is in any peril currently. (unfortunately I thought it was one of the dullest things I've ever seen, though I can't speak of the parts I slept through)
Eric Stott
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syd

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostSun Jan 11, 2015 2:59 pm

oldposterho wrote:Ooh, definitely second A Kiss for Cinderella. Such an interesting film, not to mention the Barrie provenance. The dodgy elements might make an even stronger case for preservation, imho. Be a shame if the new copyright 'protection' would make getting this rebuilt harder.

--Peter



What state are surviving elements in?
When was the last time they were taken
out of storage and examined?

AKFC does not deserve the obscurity it
has received. Digital restoration should
be the magic wand this movie needs.
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mwalls

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Jan 21, 2015 11:16 am

Hi Rob,

This was a really great topic. While there are lots of great topics on this site, discoveries and preservation are the most exciting. Did any of the suggestions spark interest?

Thanks,
Matthew
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Bor Enots

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostWed Jan 21, 2015 8:34 pm

I have been looking up what we have of the suggested titles and stars and have sent some of them up to the lab for preservation. Others we have already done. I'll post a blow-by-blow account soon.
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Brooksie

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 22, 2015 4:49 am

If there's still time, there are a couple of titles I came across in my 1916 Film Diary research that sound intriguing:

The Ne'er Do Well (1916)
(Selig)
We know Wheeler Oakman from a zillion or so Westerns, but here he is as a romantic leading man, shanghaied off to the Panama Canal, where he becomes enthralled by a wealthy married woman (Kathlyn Williams). Critics of the time clearly regarded it a major work - Moving Picture World's review extends for 1 1/2 pages - even a spiritual sequel to The Spoilers (1914). Also of interest would be the footage of the Panama Canal under construction.

Sunshine Molly (1915)
(Bosworth)
The fact that it's directed by and starring Lois Weber would make a good argument for the historical interest of this one, but it also sounds like a really fun film, which you can't always say about Weber. It's a battle-of-the-sexes comedy set in the California oilfields; publicity made particular note of a spectacular oil well fire scene, shot on location at the La Brea oilfields.

The Vampire (1915)
(Popular Plays and Players)
One of several films Alice Guy Blache made with Olga Petrova as leading lady (the majority of the others are lost, so far as I can see). There would have to be some interest in seeing work from Guy's Hollywood period, as well in her take on the 'vamp' genre. The review that interests me most reports women in the audience siding WITH the vamp and against the 'good little fiancee' whose betrothed she snapped up.

(In fact, I can't think of another vamp film directed by a woman. Can anyone else?)

The Case of Becky (1915)
(Lasky)
Here's a plot that doesn't seem to belong in the silent era: Blanche Sweet plays Dorothy, an innocent young woman who, under hypnotism, is revealed to have a second, evil personality named Becky. A silent Three Face of Eve? Perhaps - in any case, I'd sure like to find out! It might make a nice double with Lasky's The Secret Sin (1915), which I understand the LoC has already preserved.

I'd also put in a vote for Triangle/Kaybee's The Coward (1915) - interesting to see another Civil War drama coming so close to Birth of a Nation. Some reviews suggested Ince's battle scenes were superior to Griffith's.
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silentfilm

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 22, 2015 12:19 pm

Brooksie, David Shepard released The Coward (1915) on DVD fifteen years ago. I have it on DVD, and a 16mm print from Blackhawk Films. The war scenes are not nearly as spectacular as BOAN. However, it's a good film, as Charles Ray turns in a good performance.
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Brooksie

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostThu Jan 22, 2015 5:14 pm

Thanks - I'll have to track down a copy. I still do want to compare those battle scenes. The sense I got is that Ince's were considered more coherent and more genuinely 'battle-like' than BOAN's. I don't know if it's coincidence, but Ince's timing was very good for the British and Australian markets, where WWI had made the theme of a young man reluctant to go to war very timely.
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missdupont

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 12:41 am

THE CASE OF BECKY showed at Cinecon a few years ago, in a pretty good looking print.
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Bobbed Hair ? The New Klondike ?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 3:55 am

ImageImage
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Bor Enots

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 6:42 am

The New Klondike is playing at Cinefest.
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silentfilm

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 11:59 am

Here's my review of The Cast of Becky at the 2010 Cinecon...

The Case of Becky (1915) was a cool drama about Blanche Sweet's split personality and hypnotism, but some people thought it was laughable. Theodore Roberts is a traveling hypnotist, and Blanche Sweet is his main subject for his stage show. An unintended side-effect is that Blanche has developed a second personality, Becky, who is rude and antagonistic. When the change comes over Blanche, she gets an Elvis lip-sneer, chews her gum, and always unbuttons her blouse at the top. Carlisle Blackwell plays a young doctor-hypnotist who tries to cure her. It may have been hokey to some people, but if you look at it as early science-fiction or an early psychological drama, it’s pretty interesting. (**½)
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Christopher Jacobs

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 4:17 pm

Brooksie wrote:Thanks - I'll have to track down a copy. I still do want to compare those battle scenes. The sense I got is that Ince's were considered more coherent and more genuinely 'battle-like' than BOAN's. I don't know if it's coincidence, but Ince's timing was very good for the British and Australian markets, where WWI had made the theme of a young man reluctant to go to war very timely.


I used to have the old Blackhawk print of THE COWARD in 8mm back in the 70s, and got the DVD maybe 10 or 15 years ago, but the DVD is from different (or additional) sources, as some parts are extremely sharp but scratched up and others are clean-looking but softer-focus. THE COWARD also showed at the Cinecon in 2011 in a very nice-looking 35mm restoration but I don't recall if it was further restored or a different restoration from what's on the DVD or not. Here's what I wrote about it then...

The Coward (1915) ***
Nicely restored 35mm print with at least three or four title fonts. This Civil War drama is a bit slow starting, but impressively shot and edited, with relatively restrained performances for 1915, and picks up once the war begins. Several main plot points were borrowed by Buster Keaton a decade later for THE GENERAL.
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silentfilm

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostFri Jan 23, 2015 11:56 pm

My Blackhawk 16mm of The Coward has about three or four shots that are repeated. Not in one place, but sprinkled throughout the film. I don't think that it was an editing error. It may have been a (modern) lab error. I guess I need to edit out the duplicated shots.
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Darren Nemeth

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Re: PRESERVE WHAT?

PostTue Jan 27, 2015 8:49 pm

Dantes Inferno (1924) Fox Film Corp.

Primrose Path (1925) Clara Bow. UCLA as all the materials to do a restoration (including 5 tinted reels from me) but it hasnt started yet.

The episode of "Voice of Hollywood" (1930) featuring Jean Harlow and Bela Lugosi. Same as Primrose. Has not been restored yet, as far as I know.

Around the World with Douglas Fairbanks (1931)
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