Original silent era theater programs

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silentfilm

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Original silent era theater programs

PostSat May 17, 2008 12:45 pm

Since it seems to be a slow weekend in Nitrateville, here's some original theater programs for your reading pleasure...

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From the Regent Theatre in Albany, NY. Week of March 5th, 1917. William Fox must have charged extra rental for Theda Bara's The Tiger Woman!

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Paramount Theater Paris, France, March 1928. English translation at http://www.silentfilmstillarchive.com/paramount_paris_march28.htm.

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Loew's Greeley Square, New York - May 10, 1926. If the text is too small, it can be read at http://www.silentfilmstillarchive.com/loews_greeley_sq_may101926.htm

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Symphony Theatre - Compton, California - November, 1925
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radiotelefonia

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PostSat May 17, 2008 9:54 pm

Nice to see a fellow countryman of mine whose authentic name was probably Enrique D'Arrast.

Here is something from Spain:

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gjohnson

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PostSun May 18, 2008 10:11 am

Boy!.......vaudeville acts, symphonic concerts, x-mas gifts, free ice cream, musical comedy revues, dance contests -- not to mention comedy shorts, cartoons and newsreels.........when did patrons get around to watching the features?
And these programs changed every two or three days and it started all over. Then factor in the countless other rival neighborhood theaters with their own programs, add in that there were basically six major studios in the silent era who released a film a week and hundreds of independent films being made and it boggles the mind how one could see the majority of releases each year without moving in and setting up camp at your local Riaolto.

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silentfilm

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PostSun May 18, 2008 3:42 pm

gjohnson wrote:Then factor in the countless other rival neighborhood theaters with their own programs, add in that there were basically six major studios in the silent era who released a film a week and hundreds of independent films being made and it boggles the mind how one could see the majority of releases each year without moving in and setting up camp at your local Riaolto.


People went to the movies back then like we watch television -- quite frequently. Most features were just over an hour then. The cartoon, comedy, or scenic (travelogue) would make the show longer. People would go after work, or after dinner. Wives would go in the afternoon.

What get me is the continuous shows. Who wants to walk into the middle of a film?

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Loew's Greeley Square, New York - October 18th, 1926
Full text at http://www.silentfilmstillarchive.com/loews_greeley_sq_oct181926.htm
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radiotelefonia

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PostTue May 20, 2008 12:10 am

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PostTue May 20, 2008 9:49 pm

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PostSun May 25, 2008 10:14 pm

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PostSun May 25, 2008 10:17 pm

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PostSun May 25, 2008 10:18 pm

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dr.giraud

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Re: Original silent era theater programs

PostWed May 28, 2008 3:11 pm

[quote="silentfilm"]From the Regent Theatre in Albany, NY. Week of March 5th, 1917. William Fox must have charged extra rental for Theda Bara's The Tiger Woman!

Between Hamilton Street and Madison Avenue on South Pearl Street . . . this is--I mean, was--just around the corner (a bit) from my apartment. The thing that had me puzzled was the Hamilton Avenue reference, because now Hamilton doesn't extend that last block down to South Pearl. There's a big ugly 1970s apartment building and grounds where the street used to go. And since many of the buildings on that small stretch of Pearl are still there, I'm guessing the Regent was on that lost corner too.

Thanks Bruce!
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boblipton

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PostWed May 28, 2008 4:22 pm

Greeley Square is the north end of Herald Square currently, but using Google I see that the Greeley Square Theater was at 855 6th Avenue, which is the northwest corner of 30th Street.

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silentfilm

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PostWed May 28, 2008 4:51 pm

The Albany Regent Theater was not listed in CinemaTreasures, so I created an entry at http://cinematreasures.org/theater/24010/.

Here's the CinemaTreasures entry for the Greeley Square Theater. Apparently the name was later changed to the Greeley Theater.
http://cinematreasures.org/theater/11987/

BTW, CinemaTreasures is a great resource on old theaters.

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