Search found 1030 matches

by Bob Birchard
Fri May 20, 2016 6:50 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: TOL'ABLE DAVID (1930)
Replies: 13
Views: 3020

Re: TOL'ABLE DAVID (1930)

This film was Cromwell's debut. So either he bought a copy for himself as a keepsake or Columbia gifted him with a copy as he signed a contract with them. Whatever the case it's great that the film still exists in pristine condition thanks to him and his family who donated it to UCLA. Now if only i...
by Bob Birchard
Wed May 18, 2016 7:15 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Timothy's Quest
Replies: 9
Views: 2139

Re: Timothy's Quest

boblipton wrote:Olcott was at Kalem, not Biograph.

Bob
He started at Biograph, then went to Kalem when it was formed.
by Bob Birchard
Mon May 16, 2016 6:50 am
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Marx Brothers Vaudeville Career - October book release
Replies: 15
Views: 4122

Re: Marx Brothers Vaudeville Career - October book release

Dirwuf wrote:Kudos to Mr. Bader, I'm sure it will be fantastic.

Missed opportunity though, this is the one Marx Brothers book that should include Gummo on the cover...
That would be FIVE OF THE FOUR MUSKETEERS, and then you'd have to add Michael York to the cover, as well.
by Bob Birchard
Sun May 15, 2016 5:58 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: The Awful Truth (1925)
Replies: 2
Views: 893

Re: The Awful Truth (1925)

UCLA had (has?) a 16mm acetate print that was suffering vinegar syndrome and safety decomposition. They made the video transfer to preserve a record of the film. This was quite a number of years ago. I have not seen it.
by Bob Birchard
Mon May 09, 2016 4:33 am
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Lost talkies list
Replies: 130
Views: 59674

Re: Lost talkies list

The great irony is that Lionel Barrymore "directed" John Gilbert and Norma Shearer in the "balcony scene" in Hollywood Revue of 1929 . They all seemed to be having fun. The list of talkies credited to Barrymore as director isn't all that bad: Madame X, The Unholy Night, His Glorious Night, Redempti...
by Bob Birchard
Sun May 08, 2016 5:38 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Lost talkies list
Replies: 130
Views: 59674

Re: Lost talkies list

The great irony is that Lionel Barrymore "directed" John Gilbert and Norma Shearer in the "balcony scene" in Hollywood Revue of 1929 . They all seemed to be having fun. The list of talkies credited to Barrymore as director isn't all that bad: Madame X, The Unholy Night, His Glorious Night, Redempti...
by Bob Birchard
Sat May 07, 2016 2:00 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: TOL'ABLE DAVID (1930)
Replies: 13
Views: 3020

Re: TOL'ABLE DAVID (1930)

The 1930 version has been pressrved by SONY. We ran it at Cinecon a number of years ago.
by Bob Birchard
Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:02 am
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Recent research on three actors
Replies: 34
Views: 8367

Re: Recent research on three actors

I see you found them in the 1930 census though the address is actually 1334-1336 North Harper Ave., an apartment building known as Harper House in West Hollywood. It's still there. Not only is Norma also living there (listed as Norma Schenck), but also Gilbert Roland (the reason she was separated f...
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:51 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Zoo in Budapest
Replies: 38
Views: 5841

Re: Zoo in Budapest

Jack Theakston is right about so many things, but not about ZOO IN BUDAPEST. On this point we'll just have to agree to disagree, old friend.
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:42 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Happy 117 George O'Brien!
Replies: 3
Views: 699

Re: Happy 117 George O'Brien!

George was one of the Greats, and I am so pleased to have been able to call this "Man of a few thosand words" a friend.
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:37 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Petition to digitize Tom Tyler's FBO silent films
Replies: 7
Views: 1407

Re: Petition to digitize Tom Tyler's FBO silent films

Don't know how many, if any, survive. There was a srory circulating around years ago that the RKO (successir to F.B.O.) vault guy supplemented his income by sending the F.B.O. films to silver reclamation.
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 21, 2016 4:43 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Economics of Running a Movie House in the Old Days
Replies: 19
Views: 2089

Re: Economics of Running a Movie House in the Old Days

Everybody thinks of glamour and big bucks when it comes to the movies, but the truth is there was a lot of penny-pinching involved in keeping a theater going, and in making money for the producers, and there are reasons why things operated the way they did. For example, The Three Stooges shorts at C...
by Bob Birchard
Sat Apr 16, 2016 9:35 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Now Available: Second Volume of Silent Serial History
Replies: 2
Views: 560

Re: Now Available: Second Volume of Silent Serial History

I'm delighted to announce that Handsome Heroes and Vicious Villains , the second book in my two-part history of silent-era American movie serials, is now available for immediate shipping. At 406 pages, 160,000 words, and 330 illustrations, it's the most comprehensive treatment this subject has ever...
by Bob Birchard
Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:25 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

Jim, There is no doubt that the term "subtitle" means captioning or lower-third supered titles. I have never argued ottherwise. The issue is whether, in context, audiences are mentally incapable of understanding that the term "subtitle" also applies to title cards in silent movies. I simply have a ...
by Bob Birchard
Tue Apr 12, 2016 8:01 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

The truth is that context is everything, and I doubt that anyone would or could misunderstand the concept of "subtitles" as full-screen dialogue and descriptive titles in a silent film, AND as lower-third-supered translations in a foreign film. Bob, I think just about everybody nowadays has been en...
by Bob Birchard
Mon Apr 11, 2016 12:02 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

So if intertitles are supposed to be called subtitles, then what do we now call subtitles? We call them "subtitles." It's what they are commonly understood to be, and we don't have an Academie Francaise to assert new definitions to terms in common use. Which is why, despite my respect for Bob Birch...
by Bob Birchard
Sat Apr 09, 2016 9:57 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

And we should also call all films photoplays :lol: Actually, the term "photoplay" was coined circa 1912 by a contest winner, the goal of which contest was to come up with a term for the medium that had more dignity than "the movies." But the terms "motion picture" and "movie" were already establish...
by Bob Birchard
Fri Apr 08, 2016 11:46 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: TOO MANY KISSES (1925) -- has it turned up?
Replies: 9
Views: 1677

Re: TOO MANY KISSES (1925) -- has it turned up?

For some reason original 16mm reduction prints from the original camera negatives of both TOO MANY KISSES and THE SHOCK PUNCH turned up in the vault of director Irvin Willat after his death. He had nothing to do with the films, so perhaps it was through his friendship with Richard Dix that they came...
by Bob Birchard
Fri Apr 08, 2016 2:09 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

Nick_M wrote:So if intertitles are supposed to be called subtitles, then what do we now call subtitles?
As stated above, whether full-screen cards, or lower-third screen superimpositions, they are all subtitles, or titles.
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:55 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

So, I just did a Lantern search on the words "subtitle" and "intertitle." The trade publications indexed on line, which go from the early 1910s into the early 1960s, show 2417 instances where the term "subtitle" appears, and 0, nil, nada, zilch for the term "intertitle." I also did a newspapers.com ...
by Bob Birchard
Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:12 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

Does anyone know who coined the term, "intertitle?" The earliest I can find it in print is circa 1980-81. I'm sure it's an abbreviation of "interstitial title." Claire Dupré la Tour claims that the term intertitle came into use in the early 1930s “to differentiate the practice from the then new pro...
by Bob Birchard
Tue Apr 05, 2016 5:21 pm
Forum: Image Gallery
Topic: A trip through time
Replies: 4
Views: 2048

A trip through time

by Bob Birchard
Mon Apr 04, 2016 5:06 pm
Forum: Music For Silents
Topic: When to start the accompaniment?
Replies: 26
Views: 15780

Re: When to start the accompaniment?

Gaylord Carter when he did silent films always used to do one, because as he said, "you are not going to notice the music when the film is playing - so that's why I am going to play a medley of the themes - so you will notice me now!" :D That said, as I recall Gaylord would always break between his...
by Bob Birchard
Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:55 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

Does anyone know who coined the term, "intertitle?" The earliest I can find it in print is circa 1980-81. I'm sure it's an abbreviation of "interstitial title." Who wrote the piece you found from ca. 1980? That may be the person. It is always explained that "intertitle" is a more useful term than "...
by Bob Birchard
Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:33 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Books on Intertitles
Replies: 45
Views: 5766

Re: Books on Intertitles

As Jay pointed out above, the term "intertitle" was completely unknown in the Silent era. It is a relatively recent academic construct. Early on they were often referred to as leaders, likely because the most common use of such titles in the early silent era was to describe action that would follow....
by Bob Birchard
Wed Mar 16, 2016 1:22 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)
Replies: 15
Views: 2035

Re: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)

greta de groat wrote:
Daniel Eagan wrote:
greta de groat wrote:I was afraid of the Quaker Oats man too.

greta
But not Captain Crunch, I hope.
No, but i was also scared of Uncle Ben and Bozo the Clown.

greta
What's white and fluffy and crawls up you leg? Uncle Ben's perverted rice.
by Bob Birchard
Tue Mar 15, 2016 9:03 am
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)
Replies: 15
Views: 2035

Re: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)

By the time I saw WHEN COMEDY WAS KING in a theater, I was 10 years old, and "sophisticated" enough to get it. Even so, part of what made Youngson's work so great is that he told you you were looking at a bygone time. When I was 7, I was certainly aware that the cars and clothes in the L&H films wer...
by Bob Birchard
Mon Mar 14, 2016 10:04 pm
Forum: Talking About Silents
Topic: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)
Replies: 15
Views: 2035

Re: Silent Film Historian Robert G. Youngson (1917-1974)

I was 7 when Oliver Hardy passed away. I remember hearing about it on TV in LA Jolla, CA, where we were on vacation. I was very sad because I thought there wold be no more Laurel & Hardy on TV. I didn't think what they were doing was "real," I knew they were entertainers, but I obviously didn't unde...
by Bob Birchard
Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:47 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: THE DESERT SONG (1929)
Replies: 105
Views: 31962

Re: THE DESERT SONG (1929)

Efftee Pictures. Try As I might, my eyes made that out as Effete Pictures the first three times I looked at that. ;-) Really great to see this. Thanks for posting.
by Bob Birchard
Wed Feb 10, 2016 5:18 pm
Forum: Talking About Talkies
Topic: Wheeler & Woolsey
Replies: 133
Views: 35130

Re: Wheeler & Woolsey

The article states that W&W "worked well" with George Stevens on Kentucky Kernals(1934) and The Nitwits(1935). A great stroke of luck for them during the team's short career. Stevens knew comedy so well that he could bring coherence to their verbal jabbering, and use the visual aspects of comedy to...