Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

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Metaldams
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Metaldams » Wed Apr 18, 2018 8:17 pm

Smari1989 wrote:I'd argue that the comedians who succeeded best in features were the ones who realized, fairly early, that a comedy feature is a different animal from shorts, and requires a share of slightly more "serious" moments in order to make room for character development.

Anyway, really looking forward to THE ROUND-UP, should be here soon I hope.
Agree completely, Marx Brothers at Paramount aside.
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wich2
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by wich2 » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:37 pm

Smari1989 wrote:I'd argue that the comedians who succeeded best in features were the ones who realized, fairly early, that a comedy feature is a different animal from shorts, and requires a share of slightly more "serious" moments in order to make room for character development.
Precisely!

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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by wich2 » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:39 pm

Metaldams wrote:Fields? Definite drama in his films, especially in YOU'RE TELLING ME (train scene especially), and in the just recently watched RUNNING WILD. Tons of dramatic character development with Fields, yet it never overtakes the comedy.
Precisely II!

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bigshot
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by bigshot » Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:14 pm

Fields is deadpan, not dramatic. He is the most unique comedian of them all. He didn't follow any rules or formulas.

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Mike Gebert
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:46 pm

I posted about this film in the Old Movies In HD thread here.
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

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Peg of the PreCodes
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Peg of the PreCodes » Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:25 pm

wich2 wrote:Things like Buster's straighter moments in THE GENERAL, and Chaplin's in CITY LIGHTS, are bad?
Or Arbuckle in LIFE OF THE PARTY (1920)? (BTW, any chance of that one coming to DVD?)

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Smari1989
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Smari1989 » Fri Apr 20, 2018 11:39 am

LIFE OF THE PARTY was scheduled for inclusion in the planned Arbuckle Anthology a few years back, at least, so we may hope that's still the case.

Metaldams
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Metaldams » Fri Apr 20, 2018 6:37 pm

Peg of the PreCodes wrote:
wich2 wrote:Things like Buster's straighter moments in THE GENERAL, and Chaplin's in CITY LIGHTS, are bad?
Or Arbuckle in LIFE OF THE PARTY (1920)? (BTW, any chance of that one coming to DVD?)
I too hope it gets released, never have seen it.

Speaking of which, do any of Arbuckle's features outside of THE ROUND UP, LIFE OF THE PARTY, and LEAP YEAR survive?
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Danny Burk
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Danny Burk » Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:06 pm

According to the LOC database:

GASOLINE GUS (Belgium and Russia)
THE TRAVELING SALESMAN (Eastman House)
CRAZY TO MARRY (Belgium and Russia)

Metaldams
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Metaldams » Sat Apr 21, 2018 5:32 am

Danny Burk wrote:According to the LOC database:

GASOLINE GUS (Belgium and Russia)
THE TRAVELING SALESMAN (Eastman House)
CRAZY TO MARRY (Belgium and Russia)
Thanks!
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Lonesome Luke
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Lonesome Luke » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:49 am

I have a bright idea. Why not take The Round Up out of the Arbuckle Anthology, and replace it with something else? It's fine as a stand alone Blu-ray/DVD combo. (It'll just be taking up extra room for someone who already bought the Blu-ray anyway.) And you don't have to replace it with another feature film (could be some extra short films even). I'd be more inclined to buy The Round Up if I couldn't get it anywhere else. Basically, it's $29.99 for just two short films (which comes out to almost $40 in Canadian funds) if you plan on buying the Anthology. The Arbuckle Anthology will be great with, or without that film.

Just my two cents.
wich2 wrote:Things like Buster's straighter moments in THE GENERAL, and Chaplin's in CITY LIGHTS, are bad?
The key word here is "moments". I don't mind that; that's fine. The General isn't my favorite Keaton film. I like Sherlock Jr. and The Navigator more. And City Lights is full of gags, even with the straighter moments.

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Brooksie
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Brooksie » Thu Apr 26, 2018 1:00 pm

The thing to understand with The Round Up (mild spoilers ahead for those who haven't seen it) is that it's not really a comedy, and it's not really an Arbuckle starring vehicle as such. When I reviewed it after seeing it at Cinecon, I compared it to Robin Williams' role as the genie in Disney's Aladdin (1992). Story-wise, he's a peripheral character, but he's still the whole show. It felt very much like one of those films where the audience was expected to be familiar with the source material, and Arbuckle's character in particular.

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Paul E. Gierucki
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Paul E. Gierucki » Sat Apr 28, 2018 9:32 am

Lea Stans, creator of the Silent-ology website, has just reviewed CineMuseum's new DVD / Blu-ray release of THE ROUND UP starring Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle!

https://silentology.wordpress.com/2018/ ... hony-2017/" target="_blank

Posted on April 27, 2018
by Lea Stans

It’s with a resounding “Hurrah!” that I greet CineMuseum’s newest release, a Blu-ray/DVD combo of Roscoe Arbuckle’s first feature film, The Round Up (1920). If you’ve read any of my Comique Month series from last July, you’ll know that I’m a big Arbuckle fan. So having this charming Western available is a nice boon for my collection.

Prior to making The Round Up, Arbuckle had been first a Keystone comedian and then a top-notch comedy director and star at his own studio, Comique. He famously gave Buster Keaton his first film roles. Around 1919 he got an offer to star in features, so he handed over the Comique reins to Keaton and went to work on feature #1.

The Round-Up (1920) Stars: Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, Mabel Julienne Scott, Irving Cummings, Tom Forman ~ Director: George Melford

Sadly, after working like crazy on several features in a row (early 1920s studios churned out features as fast as a mini donut machine), the infamous Rappe scandal hit and Arbuckle films were pulled out of circulation. And thus, The Round Up was unavailable for nearly a century–until this very spring!

An interesting bit of trivia: This feature was based on a 1907 play that starred well-known stage actor Macklyn Arbuckle. Macklyn was the actor who coined the doleful phrase “Nobody loves a fat man,” but after The Round Up was released in 1920 the phrase was forever associated with the other Arbuckle–Roscoe!

Arbuckle was given the role of Sheriff “Slim” Hoover so he could work while films more tailored to his talents were being prepared. In general, cowboy heroes in silent Westerns tended to be lean, strong-jawed types like Tom Mix, so Arbuckle’s role was a little atypical. But he does an excellent job, still using his familiar comic timing and flourishes but within a more subtle, “light comedy” format.

As a whole, The Round Up is a pretty standard Western drama with familiar situations and characters (Wallace Beery plays a villain, because of course), enlivened by Arbuckle’s presence. This particular DVD set, however, has the advantages of Donald Sosin’s evocative new score (Sosin’s one of my favorite silent accompanists), and the beautiful print quality. CineMuseum performed a stunning 4K digital transfer and restoration from the 35mm archival master print preserved by the Library of Congress and Paramount Archives. As a result, we’re presented with a crisp, perfectly tinted film looking pretty much the way a 1920 audience would’ve seen it. This is the sort of thing we silent film fans live for!

And by the way, you’ll want to keep your eyes peeled for a certain famous “Easter egg” in the form of Buster Keaton making an unbilled appearance as an American Indian. (By a painful-looking fall ye shall know him.)

Also included in the set are the Keystone shorts A Bandit and Peeping Pete (both 1913, and both in very nice quality), a commentary track by historian Richard M. Roberts (I always enjoy CineMuseum’s commentaries!), a gallery of posters and other promo items, and a booklet. This release is fascinating for both silent comedy fans and lovers of old Westerns–and it’s certainly important for Keaton completists! You can buy it here: http://www.CineMuseumLLC.com" target="_blank

Mark Zimmer
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Re: Arbuckle: The Round Up (1920)

Unread post by Mark Zimmer » Wed May 02, 2018 3:29 pm

Sosin's one of my favorites too. The work he did on the earlier Arbuckle set is simply phenomenal.

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