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Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter the P

Unread post by silentfilm » Sun Apr 08, 2018 10:07 am

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/ ... me/557420/

A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter the Public Domain
For the first time in two decades, a huge number of books, films, and other works will escape U.S. copyright law.
A black-and-white photo of Charlie Chaplin at a podium, surrounded by onlookers in pews

Charlie Chaplin on the set of "The Pilgrim," which was released in 1923 Associated First National Pictures / Sunset Boulevard / Corbis / Getty

Glenn Fleishman 8:00 AM ET Technology

The Great American Novel enters the public domain on January 1, 2019—quite literally. Not the concept, but the book by William Carlos Williams. It will be joined by hundreds of thousands of other books, musical scores, and films first published in the United States during 1923. It’s the first time since 1998 for a mass shift to the public domain of material protected under copyright. It’s also the beginning of a new annual tradition: For several decades from 2019 onward, each New Year’s Day will unleash a full year’s worth of works published 95 years earlier.

This coming January, Charlie Chaplin’s film The Pilgrim and Cecil B. DeMille’s The 10 Commandments will slip the shackles of ownership, allowing any individual or company to release them freely, mash them up with other work, or sell them with no restriction. This will be true also for some compositions by Bela Bartok, Aldous Huxley’s Antic Hay, Winston Churchill’s The World Crisis, Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Pigeons, e.e. cummings’s Tulips and Chimneys, Noël Coward’s London Calling! musical, Edith Wharton’s A Son at the Front, many stories by P.G. Wodehouse, and hosts upon hosts of forgotten works, according to research by the Duke University School of Law’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain.

Throughout the 20th century, changes in copyright law led to longer periods of protection for works that had been created decades earlier, which altered a pattern of relatively brief copyright protection that dates back to the founding of the nation. This came from two separate impetuses. First, the United States had long stood alone in defining copyright as a fixed period of time instead of using an author’s life plus a certain number of years following it, which most of the world had agreed to in 1886. Second, the ever-increasing value of intellectual property could be exploited with a longer term.

But extending American copyright law and bringing it into international harmony meant applying “patches” retroactively to work already created and published. And that led, in turn, to lengthy delays in copyright expiring on works that now date back almost a century.

Only so much that’s created has room to persist in memory, culture, and scholarship. Some works may have been forgotten because they were simply terrible or perishable. But it’s also the case that a lack of access to these works in digital form limits whether they get considered at all. In recent years, Google, libraries, the Internet Archive, and other institutions have posted millions of works in the public domain from 1922 and earlier. With lightning-fast ease, their entire contents are now as contemporary as news articles, and may show up intermingled in search results. More recent work, however, remains locked up. The distant past is more accessible than 10 or 50 years ago.

The details of copyright law get complicated fast, but they date back to the original grant in the Constitution that gives Congress the right to bestow exclusive rights to a creator for “limited times.” In the first copyright act in 1790, that was 14 years, with the option to apply for an automatically granted 14-year renewal. By 1909, both terms had grown to 28 years. In 1976, the law was radically changed to harmonize with the Berne Convention, an international agreement originally signed in the 1886. This switched expiration to an author’s life plus 50 years. In 1998, an act named for Sonny Bono, recently deceased and a defender of Hollywood’s expansive rights, bumped that to 70 years.

The Sonny Bono act was widely seen as a way to keep Disney’s Steamboat Willie from slipping into the public domain, which would allow that first appearance of Mickey Mouse in 1928 from being freely copied and distributed. By tweaking the law, Mickey got another 20-year reprieve. When that expires, Steamboat Willie can be given away, sold, remixed, turned pornographic, or anything else. (Mickey himself doesn’t lose protection as such, but his graphical appearance, his dialog, and any specific behavior in Steamboat Willie—his character traits—become likewise freely available. This was decided in a case involving Sherlock Holmes in 2014.)

The reason that New Year’s Day 2019 has special significance arises from the 1976 changes in copyright law’s retroactive extensions. First, the 1976 law extended the 56-year period (28 plus an equal renewal) to 75 years. That meant work through 1922 was protected until 1998. Then, in 1998, the Sonny Bono Act also fixed a period of 95 years for anything placed under copyright from 1923 to 1977, after which the measure isn’t fixed, but based on when an author perishes. Hence the long gap from 1998 until now, and why the drought’s about to end.

Of course, it’s never easy. If you published something between 1923 and 1963 and wanted to renew copyright, the law required registration with the U.S. Copyright Office at any point in the first 28 years of copyright, followed at the 28-year mark with the renewal request. Without both a registration and a renewal, anything between 1923 and 1963 is already in the public domain. Many books, songs, and other printed media were never renewed by the author or publisher due to lack of sales or interest, an author’s death, or publisher’s shutting down or bankruptcy. One estimate from 2011 suggests about 90 percent of works published in the 1920s haven’t been renewed. That number shifted to 60 percent or so in the 1940s. But there are murky issues about ownership and other factors for as many as 30 percent of books from 1923 to 1963. It’s impossible to determine copyright status easily for them.

It’s easier to prove a renewal was issued than not, making it difficult for those who want to make use of material without any risk of challenge. Jennifer Jenkins, the director of Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, says, “Even if works from 1923 technically entered the public domain earlier because of nonrenewal, next year will be different, because then we’ll know for sure that these works are in the public domain without tedious research.”

Jenkins’s group was unable, for instance, to find definitive proof that The Great American Novel wasn’t renewed, but that doesn’t mean there’s not an undigitized record in a file in Washington, D.C. While courts can be petitioned to find works affirmatively in the public domain, as ultimately happened following a knotted dispute over “Happy Birthday to You,” most of the time the issue only comes up when an alleged rights holder takes legal action to assert that copyright still holds. As a result, it’s more likely a publisher would wait to reissue The Great American Novel in 2019 than worry about Williams’s current copyright holders objecting in 2018.
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There’s one more bit of wiggle, too: Libraries were granted special dispensation in the 1998 copyright revision over work in its last 20 years of its copyright so long as the work isn’t being commercially exploited, such as a publisher or author having a book in print or a musician actively selling or licensing digital sheet music. But hundreds of thousands of published works from 1923 to 1941 can be posted legally by libraries today, moving forward a year every year. (The Internet Archive assembles these works from partners at its ironic Sonny Bono Memorial Collection site.)

It’s possible this could all change again as corporate copyright holders start to get itchy about expirations. However, the United States is now in harmony with most of the rest of the world, and no legislative action is underway this year to make any waves that would affect the 2019 rollover.

A Google spokesperson confirmed that Google Books stands ready. Its software is already set up so that on January 1 of each year, the material from 95 years that’s currently digitized but only available for searching suddenly switches to full text. We’ll soon find out more about what 1923 was really like. And in 2024, we might all ring in the new year whistling Steamboat Willie’s song.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by AbZeroNow » Sun Apr 08, 2018 2:54 pm

I'm personally hoping for some "Little Old New York" Kickstarter by somebody on this online forum next year.

Also seeing "Safety Last" joining public domain will be very nice.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Agnes » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:20 am

I love" safety last", but it's not a big deal that that's going public domain. Suzanne Lloyd has done a very good job in the past 15 years of getting that seen.
It was shown on Turner, has been put out on DVD, and it is a Blu-ray release. As well as the fact that it has shown many times over on Turner. It is an amazing film that deserves to be seen and I'm very glad it is out there being seen.
The problem is, this is not the case with the folks who own the rights to other films .Yes "little old New York "has not been released on DVD or an on television that I have seen. Most of these films have passed from artists to the kids to their grandkids. There's been plenty of time to release them in and make money on them. Some of them haven't been made available, and public domain would open some of these up to the public. I'm looking forward to the next New Years and hoping that it does bring us a flood of amazing films into the public domain.
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by mwalls » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:33 am

It would be a very positive outcome if these films not being under protection would be released to the general public. But my question is who would do this? If there is no rights holder, would anyone or company be as ready to expend money to restore a public domain film as they would for a film for which they would hold the rights?

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:41 am

I expect to be contributing to several Kickstarter projects over the coming years, Matthew. I would imagine there's at least one Marion Davies fan who's faunching to get Little Old New York onto dvd....


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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by maliejandra » Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:33 am

I agree with Matthew. If there is a chance the profits will be lower on something that is easily accessible, or if there is a good chance someone will rip off your work due to the original content being in the public domain, someone looking to work on a restoration might have second thoughts and move onto something else.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Ken Winokur » Mon Apr 09, 2018 12:23 pm

Everybody says that last time Disney stepped in and made sure that the copyright was stopped in it tracks. Isn't that likely again this time?
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Mon Apr 09, 2018 1:32 pm

I agree with Matthew. If there is a chance the profits will be lower on something that is easily accessible, or if there is a good chance someone will rip off your work due to the original content being in the public domain, someone looking to work on a restoration might have second thoughts and move onto something else.
I suspect some of what we're seeing now, with certain vaults being opened at last, has to do with getting some revenue before the titles become PD. At the same time many of the titles that get released over and over are the PD ones-- Phantom of the Opera, The General and so on. So it's not clear to me if we'll see more or less.

Before the worry was that titles would be ripped off for low-rent video releases, but now that's all online, which makes them both easier to pirate and easier to track and remove if you care. So again-- fewer titles or more, because it's easier to steal them, or because the studios have such advantages for the collector market in terms of original materials and distribution? Who knows?
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by AbZeroNow » Mon Apr 09, 2018 2:05 pm

Ken Winokur wrote:Everybody says that last time Disney stepped in and made sure that the copyright was stopped in it tracks. Isn't that likely again this time?
All signs point to no copyright extension for this year. What a new Congress would do next year or in the near future would be anybody's guess but long copyright terms basically only benefit a very small percentage of heirs to creators. Last time also had EU as a fig leaf to extend copyright.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Brooksie » Mon Apr 09, 2018 5:38 pm

It's interesting that Safety Last has come up, because that's a special case. It's my understanding that the Harold Lloyd estate have trademarked the image of Harold hanging from a clock, and anyone who uses a similar image in any form is required to pay them a fee. The Hollywood Reporter wrote about one such case a few years back:

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-e ... rks-687956

Note that I said 'trademarked' and not 'copyrighted'. A trademark differs from a copyright in that it covers a recognisable image and, unlike copyright, is renewable indefinitely, which if I'm understanding things correctly, would suggest that you could screen Safety Last, but you would need to pay for the right to screen that specific scene.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:07 pm

Actually I think that's one of those questions that has yet to be litigated in all its subtleties. For instance, Disney hasn't tried to stop el cheapo cartoon compilations that contain the couple of PD Mickey cartoons, because there's a good chance they'd lose—but if you called your set "Mickey and Friends" with Mickey big on the box, they'd have a stronger trademark case.
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Harold Aherne » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:24 pm

It's also worth keeping in mind that there won't exactly be a "landslide" of 1923 movies entering the public domain, since only a handful of companies were vigilant about renewal during 1950 and 1951. Most Paramount, Fox, Metro, Goldwyn and Robertson-Cole features were renewed, along with some Vitagraph, Warner Bros. and productions from the larger independents. But a significant proportion of renewed titles, especially from Fox and R-C, haven't survived, and extant titles are often subject to donor restrictions at archives. Expiration of 1923 copyrights may allow certain movies that are "out there" in collectors' prints to be seen more readily or to have good-quality releases; it just won't be as big of a change for film as for other media.

Universal didn't renew any of its pre-1924 copyrights. Most Hal Roach productions up to the fall of 1926 were allowed to lapse, save for Harold Lloyd productions that were owned by Lloyd himself. I didn't see any Mack Sennett shorts in the renewal indices for 1950-51, but a couple of features were renewed, viz. The Shriek of Araby and Suzanna.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:45 pm

Have we got a list of what's at LoC that's coming out of copyright?

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by silentfilm » Mon Apr 09, 2018 8:09 pm

http://www.indiewire.com/2018/04/copyri ... 201950438/


Copyrights Will Expire for 35 Silent Films By Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, and More
This January, the largest collection of art since 1998 will become public domain.

Jenna Marotta

2 hours ago

Films by Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, and Buster Keaton are among the “hundreds of thousands” of books, musical scores, and motion pictures that will enter the public domain on January 1, according to The Atlantic. All of the works were first made available to audiences in 1923, four years before the introduction of talkies. Due to changed copyright laws, this will be the largest collection of material to lose its copyright protections since 1998.
Read More:Newly-Launched Fairfax Theater Will Take Over Silent Movie Theatre from Cinefamily — Report

Artists looking to incorporate black-and-white era throwbacks into their modern creations will have lots of new options. The Atlantic consulted unpublished research from Duke University School of Law’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, which shared with IndieWire a list of 35 films that will soon become available to all.

“Our list is therefore only a partial one; many more works are entering the public domain as well, but the relevant information to confirm this may be lost or difficult to find,” wrote Jennifer Jenkins, the center’s director, in an email. Most of the filmmakers registered for copyrights (which were then renewed), but some certifications fell out of date, or were never digitized.

“Bottom line — anything [released] in 1923 will be in the public domain next year,” wrote Jenkins. A huge swath of 95-year-old art will now lose its copyright each New Year’s Day, for the next several decades.

This list counts all 10 of the highest performers at the 1923 box office, led by Paramount Pictures’ “The Covered Wagon.” Same goes for DeMille’s original version of “The Ten Commandments.” (His 1956 remake with Charlton Heston and Yul Brenner earned seven Oscar nominations.) Chaplin directed two of the entries, comedy “The Pilgrim” and drama “A Woman of Paris,” and had a cameo in a third (“Souls for Sale,” directed by Rupert Hughes). Douglas Fairbanks Jr.’s film debut (“Stephen Steps Out”) is also in the ranks, although the actual footage has been lost.

Read on for Duke University School of Law’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain’s account, to date, of the film titles soon to become intellectual property for public use:

“A Woman of Paris,” directed by Charlie Chaplin

“Backbone,” directed by Edward Sloman

“Daddy,” directed by E. Mason Hopper

“Enemies of Women,” directed by Alan Crosland

“Eyes of the Forest,” directed by Lambert Hillyer

“Flaming Youth,” directed by John Francis Dillon

“Glumov’s Diary,” directed by S.M. Eisenstein

“Her Accidental Husband,” directed by Dallas M. Fitzgerald

“Homeward Bound,” directed by Ralph Ince

“La Roue” (“The Wheel”), directed by Abel Gance and Blaise Cendrars

“Little Old New York,” directed by Sidney Olcott

“Lost and Found on a South Sea Island,” directed by Raoul Walsh

“Main Street,” directed by Harry Beaumont

“Our Hospitality,” directed by Buster Keaton and John G. Blystone

“Potash and Perlmutter,” directed by Clarence D. Badger

“Ruggles of Red Gap,” directed by James Cruze

“Safety Last!,” directed by Fred C. Newmeyer and Sam Taylor

“Scaramouche,” directed by Rex Ingram

“Souls for Sale,” directed by Rupert Hughes

“Stephen Steps Out,” directed by Joseph Henabery

“The Barnyard,” directed by Larry Semon

“The Covered Wagon,” directed by James Cruze

“The Eternal Struggle,” directed by Reginald Barker

“The Handy Man,” directed by Robert P. Kerr

“The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” directed by Wallace Worsley

“The Mummy,” directed by Norman Taurog

“The Ne’er-Do-Well,” directed by Alfred E. Green

“The Pilgrim,” directed by Charlie Chaplin

“The Shriek of Araby,” directed by F. Richard Jones

“The Ten Commandments,” directed by Buster Keaton

“The White Rose,” directed by D.W. Griffith

“The White Sister,” by Henry King

“Three Ages,” by Buster Keaton and Edward F. Cline (uncredited)

“Where the North Begins,” directed by Chester M. Franklin

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Brooksie » Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:25 pm

silentfilm wrote: “The Ten Commandments,” directed by Buster Keaton
This I gotta see! :lol:

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Jim Roots » Tue Apr 10, 2018 5:54 am

Brooksie wrote:
silentfilm wrote: “The Ten Commandments,” directed by Buster Keaton
This I gotta see! :lol:
Can't you just see him commanding the sea to part? The possibilities are endless!

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Agnes » Tue Apr 10, 2018 7:03 am

First as you can see if you look to the left I'm a big Harold Lloyd fan and I love "Safety Last". Does the "trademark" cover showing of the film, or just still of the image. I heard Suzanne Lloyd also trademarked the boater hat & glasses image.....so if that we're inforcable in ALL forms, it would make almost NONE of Lloyd's work PD. I can't imagine that being the case .

One possibly I am hoping for is "lost" films popping up.
It was sad to see (& I know it has been considered "lost" for years) "Flaming Youth" on the list. If there is an "attic" copy somewhere, next winter it can come out of hiding without fear of leagal issues.
My big hope is that "lost" films feel free to surface.
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by silentfilm » Tue Apr 10, 2018 12:10 pm

The Three Ages, Daddy, The Ne'er-Do-Well and The Hunchback of Notre Dame are already in the public domain since they were never renewed.

You can certainly use photos and artwork from Safety Last to publicize showings of the film or to write about the film or Harold Lloyd in general. But you can't use Suzanne's trademarked images for other products like greeting cards, phone covers, lunch boxes, etc.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by missdupont » Tue Apr 10, 2018 7:02 pm

I wouldn't be sure of that. Suzanne Lloyd donated a Harold Lloyd Collection of stills, etc. to the Margaret Herrick Library. You cannot get even a photocopy of any photo of any date, without her permission.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:24 am

missdupont wrote:I wouldn't be sure of that. Suzanne Lloyd donated a Harold Lloyd Collection of stills, etc. to the Margaret Herrick Library. You cannot get even a photocopy of any photo of any date, without her permission.
But this would be "donor restrictions", wouldn't it? If you get your image of Lloyd in Safety Last from another collection, then you can certainly use it to promote his film.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by ChristineURen » Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:32 pm

This is tangential, but I tried to use a Nell Brinkley illustration of Marion Davies from Little Old New York in a blog post, and the Hearst company agreement stipulated, "As a condition of purchasing these rights, you agree that the publication in which the material is used will not be derogatory to or critical of the comic feature from which the material is taken or of anyone involved in the creation or production of the comic feature or of King Features or the comic industry.” I didn't use the image.

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Frederica » Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:47 pm

Brooksie wrote:
silentfilm wrote: “The Ten Commandments,” directed by Buster Keaton
This I gotta see! :lol:
PLEASE!
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Apr 11, 2018 4:16 pm

Frederica wrote:
Brooksie wrote:
silentfilm wrote: “The Ten Commandments,” directed by Buster Keaton
This I gotta see! :lol:
PLEASE!
Medium Shot: Pharoah gestures to the Egyptian Army

Title Card: Pursue the Israelis across the parted Red Sea!

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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Donald Binks » Wed Apr 11, 2018 5:18 pm

boblipton wrote:
Medium Shot: Pharoah gestures to the Egyptian Army

Title Card: Pursue the Israelis across the parted Red Sea!

Bob
Immediately followed up by the director's assistant (off camera) heaving a bucket of water in the Pharoah's face...
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Jeff Rapsis » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:00 am

Regarding the issue of Harold Lloyd trademarks: the California "dead celebrity" legislation makes it specifically clear that any work in the public domain cannot be subject to trademark claims or other intellectual property restrictions. So although Harold's likeness and the iconic glasses are protected trademarks, Lloyd's public domain films can be shown regardless. As pointed out above, the trademark protections allow the holder to control commercial use of images in such things as souvenirs.
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by Harold Aherne » Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:40 pm

Here's a list of 1923 copyrights that were renewed in 1950 or 1951 and thus will, prima facie, enter the public domain on the first day of 2019, barring further copyright extensions. Note, however, that the list is not intended as legal advice. It doesn't address the copyright of underlying works, nor the special circumstances of the Chaplin copyrights. There may be errors or omissions in the renewal indices I consulted, as well as errors made by this compiler. Note that some films that premiered in late 1922 were copyrighted in early 1923 and won't become PD until 2019, and likewise some late 1923 premieres weren't copyrighted until 1924 and thus will remain protected until 2020.

Works consulted can be found at: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/cce/

Now, onward!

Copyrighted by Associated First National Pictures Inc.; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.
Boy of Mine
Flaming Youth
Her Temporary Husband
The Huntress
Penrod and Sam
Ponjola
Thundergate

Copyrighted by C.B.C Film Sales Corp.; renewed by Columbia Pictures Corp.
Her Accidental Husband
Temptation

Copyrighted by Famous Players-Lasky Corp., renewed by Paramount Pictures Corp.
Adam’s Rib
Big Brother
Bluebeard’s Eighth Wife
The Cheat
Children of Jazz
The Covered Wagon
Dark Secrets
The Exciters
Fog Bound
A Gentleman of Leisure
The Glimpses of the Moon
Grumpy
The Heart Raider
His Children’s Children
Hollywood
Homeward Bound
The Law of the Lawless
The Leopardess
The Light That Failed
The Marriage Maker
Mr. Billings Spends His Dime
My American Wife
Nobody’s Money
Only Thirty-Eight
Prodigal Daughters
Racing Hearts
Ruggles of Red Gap
The Rustle of Silk
The Silent Partner
Sixty Cents an Hour
The Snow Bride
The Spanish Dancer
Stephen Steps Out
The Ten Commandments
The Tiger’s Claw
To the Ladies
The Trail of the Lonesome Pine
The White Flower
Woman Proof
The Woman with Four Faces
The World’s Applause
You Can’t Fool Your Wife
Zaza

Copyrighted by Fox Film Corp., renewed by 20th Century-Fox Film Corp.
Alias the Night Wind
Big Dan
The Boss of Camp Four
Boston Blackie
Brass Commandments
Bucking the Barrier
The Buster
Cameo Kirby
Cupid’s Fireman
Does It Pay?
The Eleventh Hour
The Exiles
Eyes of the Forest
The Footlight Ranger
Gentle Julia
Good-by Girls!
The Governor’s Lady
The Grail
The Gunfighter
Hell’s Hole
Hoodman Blind
If Winter Comes
Kentucky Days
The Lone Star Ranger
Lovebound
Madness of Youth
The Man Who Won
Man’s Size
Mile-a-Minute Romeo
The Net
No Mother to Guide Her
North of Hudson Bay
Romance Land
St. Elmo
The Shepherd King
The Silent Command
Six Cylinder Love
Skid Proof
Snowdrift
Soft Boiled
South Sea Love
Stepping Fast
The Temple of Venus
Three Jumps Ahead
Three Who Paid
Times Have Changed
Truxton King
When Odds Are Even
You Can’t Get Away with It

Copyrighted by Goldwyn Pictures Corp., renewed by Loew’s Inc.
The Christian
The Day of Faith
The Eternal Three
In the Palace of the King
Look Your Best
Lost and Found on a South Sea Island
Red Lights
The Rendezvous
Three Wise Fools

Copyrighted by Metro Pictures Corp., renewed by Loew’s Inc.
All the Brothers Were Valiant
Crinoline and Romance
The Eagle’s Feather
Held to Answer
Her Fatal Millions
In Search of a Thrill
The Man Life Passed By
A Noise in Newboro
An Old Sweetheart of Mine
Peg o’ My Heart
Rouged Lips
Scaramouche
The Social Code
Where the Pavement Ends

Copyrighted by R-C Pictures Corp., renewed by RKO Radio Pictures Inc.
Blow Your Own Horn
Daytime Wives
Itching Palms
Lights Out
The Remittance Woman

Copyrighted by Vitagraph Company of America, renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.
The Man from Brodney’s
The Man Next Door
Masters of Men
The Midnight Alarm
On the Banks of the Wabash
One Stolen Night
Pioneer Trails
Playing It Wild

Copyrighted and renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures (Inc.)
Brass
The Country Kid
George Washington Jr.
The Gold Diggers
The Little Church Around the Corner
Little Johnny Jones
Lucretia Lombard
Main Street
The Printer’s Devil
Tiger Rose
Where the North Begins

Other
The Age of Desire (copyrighted by Arthur H. Jacobs; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Backbone (copyrighted by Distinctive Pictures Corp.; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Children of Dust (copyrighted by Arthur H. Jacobs; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Desire (copyrighted by Louis Burston; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Enemies of Women (copyrighted by William Randolph Hearst; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Eternal City (copyrighted by Madison Productions Inc.; renewed by Samuel Goldwyn)
The Eternal Struggle (copyrighted by Louis B. Mayer Productions Inc.; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Famous Mrs. Fair (copyrighted by L. B. Mayer Productions Inc.; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Glad Rags (copyrighted by Hunt Stromberg Productions; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Hearts Aflame (copyrighted by L. B. Mayer Productions Inc.; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Isle of Lost Ships (copyrighted by M. C. Levee; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Jealous Husbands (copyrighted by M. C. Levee; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Little Old New York (copyrighted by William Randolph Hearst; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Love Piker (copyrighted by William Randolph Hearst; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Our Hospitality (copyrighted by Joseph M. Schenck Productions; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
The Pilgrim (copyrighted and renewed by Charles Chaplin)
Pleasure Mad (copyrighted by Louis B. Mayer Productions Inc.; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Potash and Perlmutter (copyrighted by Samuel Goldwyn; renewed by Frances Goldwyn)
The Ragged Edge (copyrighted by Distinctive Pictures Corp.; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Reno (copyrighted by Rupert Hughes; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Safety Last (copyrighted by Hal Roach, Sam Taylor, Tim Whelan; renewed by Harold Lloyd Corp.)
The Shriek of Araby (copyrighted and renewed by Mack Sennett)
Souls for Sale (copyrighted by Rupert Hughes; renewed by Loews Inc.)
Strangers of the Night (copyrighted by Louis B. Mayer Productions Inc.; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Suzanna (copyrighted and renewed by Mack Sennett)
Trilby (copyrighted by Richard W. Tully; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
Unseeing Eyes (copyrighted by William Randolph Hearst; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Wandering Daughters (copyrighted by Sam E. Rork; renewed by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.)
The White Rose (copyrighted by D. W. Griffith Inc.; renewed by—I presume—11 of his heirs)
The White Sister (copyrighted by Inspiration Pictures; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)
Why Worry (copyrighted by Sam Taylor; renewed by Harold Lloyd Corp.)
A Woman of Paris (copyrighted by Regent Film Co.; renewed by Charles Chaplin, also by Celebrated Films Corp.)
Your Friend and Mine (copyrighted by Arthur Sawyer-Herbert Lubin Productions; renewed by Loew’s Inc.)

Short films
Apple Sauce (Fox/20th)
Arabia’s Last Alarm (Fox/20th)
Are Waitresses Safe? (Famous/Paramount)
The Artist (Fox/20th)
The Author (Fox/20th)
The Barnyard (Vitagraph/Warner Bros.)
Circus Pals (Fox/20th)
Clothes and Oil (Fox/20th)
The Cyclist (Fox/20th)
Dance or Die (Fox/20th)
Daniel Boone (Esther Willard Bates/The Chronicles of America Picture Corp.)
The Explorers (Fox/20th)
Fighting Blood (first series of 12 episodes; R-C/RKO)
Fighting Blood (second series of 12 episodes; R-C/RKO)
The Five Fifteen (Fox/20th)
The Four Flusher (Fox/20th)
Friend Husband (Famous/Paramount)
The Frontier Woman (Nathaniel Wright Stephenson/The Chronicles of America Picture Corp.)
Full Speed Ahead (Fox/20th)
The Handy Man (Quality Productions Inc./Loew’s Inc.)
Hello Pardners (Fox/20th)
His Smothered Love (Famous/Paramount)
The Income Tax Collector (Fox/20th)
Jungle Pals (Fox/20th)
The Midnight Cabaret (Vitagraph/Warner Bros.)
The Monkey Farm (Fox/20th)
A Monkey Mixup (Fox/20th)
Monks a la Mode (Fox/20th)
Movie Fans (Famous/Paramount)
The Mummy (Fox/20th)
No Wedding Bells (Vitagraph/Warner Bros.)
One Wild Day (Hunt Stromberg/Loew’s Inc.)
The Pest (Amalgamated Producing Co./Leona Anderson)
The Rainstorm (Fox/20th)
Rides and Slides (Fox/20th)
The Riding Master (Fox/20th)
The Roaring Lion (Fox/20th)
Roaring Lions on a Steamship (Fox/20th)
Room 23 (Famous/Paramount)
Roping Her Romeo (Famous/Paramount)
Rough Sailing (Fox/20th)
The Salesman (Fox/20th)
School Pals (Fox/20th)
Second-Hand Love (Fox/20th)
Slow and Sure (Fox/20th)
Snowed Under (Hunt Stromberg/Loew’s Inc.)
Somebody Lied (Fox/20th)
Spring Fever (Fox/20th)
The Tailor (Fox/20th)
The Three Gun Man (Fox/20th)
A Tropical Romeo (Fox/20th)
The Two Johns (Fox/20th)
Two Tough Tenderfeet (Famous/Paramount)
Two Twins (Hunt Stromberg/Loew’s Inc.)
The Unreal Newsreel (Fox/20th)
Up in the Air (Fox/20th)
Vincennes (William Basil Courtney/The Chronicles of America Picture Corp.)
Wet and Weary (Fox/20th)
When Knights Were Cold (Quality Producing Corp./Loew’s Inc.)
Where There’s a Will (Fox/20th)
Why Pay Rent (Fox/20th)
The Wise Cracker (Fox/20th)
Young and Dumb (Fox/20th)

[Edit: Removed Monna Vanna and This Freedom because these titles are German and British, respectively. I don't know if any material survives for them, but they will continue to be protected by European copyright conventions.]

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greta de groat
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Re: Atlantic: A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter t

Unread post by greta de groat » Thu Apr 19, 2018 9:57 pm

Interesting, so Norma and Constance Talmadge's films weren't recopyrighted, but one of Buster's was.

greta
Greta de Groat
Unsung Divas of the Silent Screen
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat

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