BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

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silentfilm
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BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:34 am

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-46403539

Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

By Chris Fox Technology reporter

1 December 2018

Image caption 2001: A Space Odyssey was released in 1968

Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey helped launch the world's first super-high definition 8K television channel on Saturday.

Japanese broadcaster NHK said it had asked Warner Bros to scan the original film negatives in 8K for its new channel.

Super-high definition 8K pictures offer 16 times the resolution of HD TV.

However, few people currently have the necessary television or equipment to receive the broadcasts.
Super hi-vision

NHK says it has been developing 8K, which it calls super-hi vision, since 1995.

As well as improved picture resolution, broadcasts can include 24 channels of audio for immersive surround sound experiences.

It is hoping to broadcast the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games using the new format.

Television manufacturers including Samsung and LG have announced 8K-capable television sets, but they are still prohibitively expensive for widespread adoption.

NHK's new channel BS8K will broadcast programmes for about 12 hours a day.

The first programme at 10:00 local time (01:00 GMT) was an information broadcast, highlighting future shows on the channel.

The channel also broadcast live from Italy to showcase "popular tourist attractions from Rome, as well as food, culture and history".

Image caption 2001: A Space Odyssey has been remastered

NHK said it had chosen to broadcast 2001: A Space Odyssey on its launch night so that viewers could enjoy a "masterpiece of film history".

Although many movies are shot on 35mm film, 2001: A Space Odyssey was shot on 65mm film, which was the highest quality available at the time.

Warner Bros was able to scan the original film negatives, repair scratches and provide an 8K version of the film that captures the "power and beauty of the original".

"The many famous scenes become even more vivid, with the attention to detail of director Stanley Kubrick expressed in the exquisite images, creating the feeling of really being on a trip in space, allowing the film to be enjoyed for the first time at home," NHK said in a statement.

In March, the channel will broadcast My Fair Lady starring Audrey Hepburn, which was also shot on 65mm film.
A new strategy

Japanese electronics-maker Sharp began selling its first 8K television in 2015. At launch it cost $133,000 (£104,000). Currently, a Samsung 8K television costs about $15,000 (£11,700) to buy.

Viewers will also need an 8K-capable satellite receiver. Sharp produces one that costs 250,000 yen (£1,750; $2,200). It requires four HDMI cables to get the pictures into a Sharp TV set, and another cable for sound.

Since 8K televisions and receivers are not yet owned by many people, NHK intends to showcase equipment in venues around Japan.

It hopes live events will tempt people to tune in, but will also repeat programmes regularly.

"8K is at the moment based around watching at the time of broadcast," it said in a statement. "We plan to increase the number of chances to watch through rebroadcasts."

"Content has always been crucial for a new TV technology to take off," Joe Cox, editor-in-chief of technology news site What Hi-Fi, told the BBC.

"The launch of the world's first 8K TV channel is great news, even if it is only in Japan. But realistically, mass market adoption is still a long, long way off.

"While the likes of Amazon and Netflix have charged head first into 4K this year, the BBC is only at the trial stage, and others are still struggling to stream HD, so 8K remains a pipedream in the UK.

"But with TV brands suggesting 8K resolution screens can improve 4K and even HD pictures, expect to see plenty more 8K TVs in 2019, even if the content doesn't come so quickly."

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Spiny Norman
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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by Spiny Norman » Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:19 am

24 audio channels, well I'll buy as soon as I grow an additional 11 pairs of ears.
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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:25 am

Isn’t 8k a higher standard than fine grain?

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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:48 am

I can see reasons to use 8K in production. For me, a 4K OLED TV from LG offers a picture beyond which my eyes cannot detect improvement, as far as I'm concerned, and one of these days when I have oodles of cash laying about I will take a couple of Criterion blu-rays—Black Narcissus and Paths of Glory, probably—to Abt Electronics, make them let me play them, and fiddle with the settings till I reach the point where I say, yes, that is as good as television can possibly get, and buy that to replace my Sony... I can't even remember the type of TV it is now...

or not.
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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by Donald Binks » Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:56 pm

Rubbish is rubbish - no matter how many digits one puts before the "k". Until such time as what is broadcast on television improves to the state of being somewhat watchable, I think I'll decline the offer of buying a set, satellite thingy and half a dozen cables to connect it all. :D

(to be honest, I was quite happy listening in to the wireless) :D
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by syd » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:47 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:

"I can see reasons to use 8K in production. For me, a 4K OLED TV from LG offers a picture beyond which my eyes cannot detect improvement, as far as I'm concerned, and one of these days when I have oodles of cash laying about I will take a couple of Criterion blu-rays—Black Narcissus and Paths of Glory, probably—to Abt Electronics, make them let me play them, and fiddle with the settings till I reach the point where I say, yes, that is as good as television can possibly get, and buy that to replace my Sony... I can't even remember the type of TV it is now...

or not."


While OLED TV sets provide amazing pictures, the reason I would never buy one is due to
a major flaw inherent in the design: burn in. When I visit big box stores, if OLED sets are being
sold there, I will look at the display set to see if burn in has settled in and most of the time it has.
If OLED is your choice of TV, it is one instance where an extended warranty would be of great
value.

As far as 8K, it is only really apparent at screen sizes over 80". Trying to stream it will only violate
your data cap and increase your service charge from your provider. When will the consumer
electronics manufacturers hit a diminishing returns wall with regard to TV resolution? At 16K? 32k?

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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by fwtep » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:48 pm

When will the consumer electronics manufacturers hit a diminishing returns wall with regard to TV resolution? At 16K? 32k?
For normal viewing distances, anything beyond 1080p is diminishing returns. The only thing you get from 4k is a wider dynamic range. I don't know how much nicer a 4K disc looks than a Blu-ray, because I don't have 4K, but Blu-ray's dynamic range definitely blows away DVD.

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Re: BBC: Space Odyssey helps launch first 8K TV channel

Unread post by All Darc » Sun Dec 09, 2018 7:27 pm

8K... Oh Holly Moly...

Is it true 8K, or a 8K just interpolated foim 4K, or interpolated from a 4K that was already interpolated from a 2K digital file ?

You know... people already don't see in 4K, what to say about 8K... To look true 4K you would need a very large screen and sit close to it, and in all LCD/LED screens the image get bad, with uneven light distribution if you look at it by close distance. So, if it's already a mess with 4K, what to say about 8K ???

Let's make a moscaic challenge for digital image compression engineers.
I challenge all of them to create a video compression system, to work in real time, able to fit a 8K image video, without artifacts, withou banding, without macro or micro blocking, and with true details, witohut soft textures out.
A system where I can create a mosaic, using moving images in SD (480p) or HD1 (720p) to fill a 8K image area like a mosaic of small moving images, and where after compression I can cut one little piece of this mosaic and run in a good TV (OLED) and see the textures and details without more loss than a very good DVD or a very good 720p video.

I challenge all engeneer int he world to create such system. And I bet they can't do it. The systems base today use too low bitrate and too trick algorithms for this.

And I also bet that if you put a 2K uncompressed video, in a 55 inch screen, and said it's 8K, péople will think it's great just beacause they heard it's 8K, and not by looking the image itself or knowing to judge it.
So they will force compression and add artifacts to the point of where most iamge details from any original 8K will vanish, since ,ost people will not notice it. In VHS or DVD days, a loss of 30% would generate complains, but today a 8K can lost 80% of details and most people will still be quiet.

Do you remamber about the tale of The Emperor's New Clothes ?

Image

That's what we are having today with so many Ks around. People forcing liking more something just because they are told that was superior, but in reality it's way more a lie.

I will be no surprised such "8K" system would have more blocking in shadow areas than a SD video. Missing shadow information due giant blocks. Informations that we would see in a prime DVD, for example.
8k but unable to render the grain even from a 16mmm film, ir even from a 35mm film. 8K unable to preserve texture even when the camera motion it's very slow. I bet it will have fewer details in motion than a uncompressed 2K file.

So, the only why to really unmask all these crap, all these lies, for a lot of people, it's with a mosaic challenge.
Keep thinking...

Image

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