What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Open, general discussion of silent films, personalities and history.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Fri May 11, 2018 3:07 pm

A Pipe Dream (1905) A lady smokes a cigarette and observes the way the smoke curls around her fingers.... as it forms into a little man kneeling on her hand, pleading with her. Then the image fades and she examines her hand with a quizzical expression.

Billy Bitzer shot this trick film for Biograph and it is an amusing little trifle in the period just before the company shifted to more substantial works. These days he is remembered as "Griffith's cameraman" and he contributed mightily to the evolution of film as we know it today, with his technical expertise; he had, after all, been a motion picture camera man a dozen years before Griffith set foot in front of a movie camera -- or behind it. There's no way of knowing whose idea this one-minute short was, and perhaps no one will ever identify the actress who stares in delightful confusion at her hand. However, together, they created a fine little movie.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat May 12, 2018 12:35 pm

SEEDS OF FREEDOM (1928) is missing the first reel as well as lacking any kind of musical accompaniment. Describing events leading to the assassination of a government official (and shifted in period to 1905) it describes incidents in the Government's treatment of the Jews and their plans for retribution. Impressively shot and very striking at times, I found it nevertheless difficult to connect with, as well as being a bit confusing at times.

Felt like a bit of relief with MATCHMAKING MAMMA (1929) a Sennett short featuring Carole Lombard, Daphne Pollard and the Sennett Girls. Rather mild and strained in its comedy, the main interest for me being the sudden flashes of Technicolor.

More interesting was the early Ozu comedy I WAS BORN, BUT... (1932) which follows the adventures of two boys when their office worker father moves the family to the suburbs. Initially facing hostility from the other children, they also rival one another as to how impressive their fathers are. Decidedly odd at times, the film is frequently amusing, before taking a rather serious turn near the end as the father (Tatsuo Saito) reflects on how he has lowered himself in order to ingratiate himself with the boss. A splendid copy, although it took me a little while to get into the film. Remade by Ozu (with added flatulence) as GOOD MORNING! in 1959, a film which I haven't seen for some forty years, but still retained odd memories.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat May 12, 2018 1:12 pm

Watched SOLD FOR MARRIAGE (1916) a couple of weeks back. A Russian-set drama (at first - shifts to the States) with Lillian Gish, but not terribly involving and which leaves very little aftertaste...

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Sat May 12, 2018 5:44 pm

The Making of an American (1920): Emil de Varney is a new immigrant from Italy. His friend tries to get him a job -- he doesn't speak English, so no. He gets a menial job, but is injured. When he gets out of the hospital, he decides to go to a class to learn English. With hard work and a good attitude, he eventually gets everything he had hoped for and when confronted with a young immigrant, he tells him to learn English and everything will follow.

This short subject from the State of Connecticut Board of Americanization was added to the National Registry in 2005. Its message seems very old-fashioned in this modern age of multi-culturism, but at its heart is the statement that education is the key to advancement. It's not a panacea, but it's an absolute necessity.... as is getting along with the other people in your community, few of whom, in Pete's day, spoke Italian.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Sat May 12, 2018 7:12 pm

Le cheveu délateur (1911) In this mixed live-action/animated short from Émile Cohl, a young man is having tea with a couple of young women. A suspicious elderly guardian plucks a hair from his head and takes it to a magician, who hocuses it into showing where the man has been.

When we think of animated cartoons, we think of images that move. Cohl had begun making movies in the era of Georges Melies and Segundo de Chomon, whose movies were frequently magical acts on screen: transformations. Although Cohl did make his figures move, he is best remembered for his transformation animations, like Fantasmagorie. While both sorts of animations continued -- who can forget Felix the Cat changing his tail into any number of objects? -- by the late 1930s, motion had won the day and transformation became a less important case in the grammar of animation, most often used to indicate that something magical was going on.

Here, though, it's at the heart of this movie, and it's a typical Cohl delight.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sun May 13, 2018 2:24 am

A film on my wants list for the best part of forty years, THE CHEATERS (1929) was filmed as a silent, then reshot / partly reshot as a talkie in 1930/31, three surviving sequences of which are added to this upload. Made by the McDonagh sisters (Charlotte directing, writing and producing and 'Marie Lorraine' starring), it features Arthur Greenaway as Richard Marsh, an employee who has embezzled in order to help his desperately sick wife. His boss, Travers, (John Faulkner) refuses any mercy and Marsh's wife dies while he languishes in jail.

Twenty years on, and Marsh is a wealthy head of a swindling gang, determined to seek revenge on Travers with the aid of his lovely daughter. Meanwhile Travers's adopted son has turned up and things take a romantic turn.

I found the earlier and later sections of THE CHEATERS more satisfying than the middle, which sags somewhat with the romantic subplot. Marsh's schemes, too, did not seem to be having that much of an effect on Travers, and one is a bit disappointed that he doesn't get his comeuppance at the end. There are one or two inconsistencies / plot holes near the end, but to detail these would spoil the film, as would to reveal a plot twist which occurs at the same time. Enjoyable if uneven, and presented here with a decent accompaniment.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Sun May 13, 2018 4:09 pm

The 28-minute cutdown of Miss Rovel (1928) I looked at was a charming, if barebones film of Victor Cherbuliez novel. Jean Worms is a gruff bachelor, rusticating in the country, off women because the girl he was supposed to marry dumped him. He is not pleased when a cosmpolitan lady moves into the next estate and holds noisy parties, nor with her daughter, Geneviève Félix, who steals figs from his tree. His sister, however, takes the girl under her wing. When Miss Felix' mother decides to marry her to a decrepit nobleman,, it's up to Worms to find her a suitable substitute.

Because of the extreme cutting of the movie, it's tough to judge, but it appears to have all the hallmarks of a respectful filmization of a classic novel -- Cherbuliez was a member of the French Academy -- and there is careful attention paid to the set decoration. The actors appear up to their tasks. Mr. Worms is suitably grouchy, Miss Felix ebullient and so forth. It undoubtedly must have pleased its French audiences in the waning days of the silent cinema.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Brooksie » Sun May 13, 2018 10:40 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:A film on my wants list for the best part of forty years, THE CHEATERS (1929) was filmed as a silent, then reshot / partly reshot as a talkie in 1930/31, three surviving sequences of which are added to this upload. Made by the McDonagh sisters (Charlotte directing, writing and producing and 'Marie Lorraine' starring), it features Arthur Greenaway as Richard Marsh, an employee who has embezzled in order to help his desperately sick wife. His boss, Travers, (John Faulkner) refuses any mercy and Marsh's wife dies while he languishes in jail.

Twenty years on, and Marsh is a wealthy head of a swindling gang, determined to seek revenge on Travers with the aid of his lovely daughter. Meanwhile Travers's adopted son has turned up and things take a romantic turn.

I found the earlier and later sections of THE CHEATERS more satisfying than the middle, which sags somewhat with the romantic subplot. Marsh's schemes, too, did not seem to be having that much of an effect on Travers, and one is a bit disappointed that he doesn't get his comeuppance at the end. There are one or two inconsistencies / plot holes near the end, but to detail these would spoil the film, as would to reveal a plot twist which occurs at the same time. Enjoyable if uneven, and presented here with a decent accompaniment.
If only I had known! I have a copy of this I could have loaned to anyone who wanted it. At least you've seen it now.

I agree that The Cheaters is in general a less successful production than The Far Paradise, though still a very watchable film. It's recently been restored by the NFSA. I hope they corrected the speed; I felt that the previous video release from the late 90s was a mite slower than it should have been.

There is a school of thought, based primarily on newspaper advertisements, that a third all-talking version of the film once existed. I'm not so sure about that. Even once the sound sections were added to bring the film up to date, the changes in fashion between the late 20s and early 30s were impossible to ignore.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Daniel Eagan » Mon May 14, 2018 7:54 am

boblipton wrote:The Making of an American (1920): Emil de Varney is a new immigrant from Italy. His friend tries to get him a job -- he doesn't speak English, so no. He gets a menial job, but is injured. When he gets out of the hospital, he decides to go to a class to learn English. With hard work and a good attitude, he eventually gets everything he had hoped for and when confronted with a young immigrant, he tells him to learn English and everything will follow.

This short subject from the State of Connecticut Board of Americanization was added to the National Registry in 2005. Its message seems very old-fashioned in this modern age of multi-culturism, but at its heart is the statement that education is the key to advancement. It's not a panacea, but it's an absolute necessity.... as is getting along with the other people in your community, few of whom, in Pete's day, spoke Italian.

Bob
Irony is that the intertitles are in English, which the target audience presumably couldn't read.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Big Silent Fan » Mon May 14, 2018 9:35 am

Brooksie wrote: It's recently been restored by the NFSA. I hope they corrected the speed; I felt that the previous video release from the late 90s was a mite slower than it should have been.
I was just getting ready to ask if you thought the restored film was running too slow. I tried twice to watch since the story and image quality were first rate, but I struggled with the slow pacing of the scenes and while they were quite wordy, there was too much time to read the intertitles. I much enjoyed the con job where they made off with the necklet, where even the detectives were part of the ruse.

If I had access to a DVD copy, in return I could dub it to a slightly faster speed (recording at 1.3 speed).

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Big Silent Fan » Mon May 14, 2018 10:11 am

Murnau's Sunrise (1927) was an old favorite before I ever had access to TCM. I first watched (with commercials) when AMC cable would run it yearly during late night, just as the did the Silent, Ben Hur.
Since I had already seen the improved versions on TCM over the years (actually taking a DVD copy to work one Sunday where my apprentice and I watched the entire film on a conference room video screen), the Blu ray release was never on my 'Must Have' list.

Today, I got up early and watched the HD version. It's clear the photography often produced a simulated 3D effect, either by having images moving in the foreground or something projecting forward in the image.
It had the same familiar score (the one Hitchcock reportedly chose his TV theme music from), which worked perfectly with the improved image quality.
My least favorite scene (a favorite for others I suppose), is the drunken piglet episode occurring about an hour in. I used the five or six minutes to refill my coffee cup and fix a snack.

As most already know, many of Murnau's films can be seen in HD on YouTube.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Mon May 14, 2018 10:42 am

Daniel Eagan wrote:
boblipton wrote:The Making of an American (1920): Emil de Varney is a new immigrant from Italy. His friend tries to get him a job -- he doesn't speak English, so no. He gets a menial job, but is injured. When he gets out of the hospital, he decides to go to a class to learn English. With hard work and a good attitude, he eventually gets everything he had hoped for and when confronted with a young immigrant, he tells him to learn English and everything will follow.

This short subject from the State of Connecticut Board of Americanization was added to the National Registry in 2005. Its message seems very old-fashioned in this modern age of multi-culturism, but at its heart is the statement that education is the key to advancement. It's not a panacea, but it's an absolute necessity.... as is getting along with the other people in your community, few of whom, in Pete's day, spoke Italian.

Bob
Irony is that the intertitles are in English, which the target audience presumably couldn't read.
You know, I didn’t think of that. It indicates either clueless film makers or that its intended audience was actually the citizenry who might wish to encourage immigrants.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Danny Burk » Mon May 14, 2018 11:17 am

Big Silent Fan wrote:It had the same familiar score (the one Hitchcock reportedly chose his TV theme music from), which worked perfectly with the improved image quality.
That's Gounod's FUNERAL MARCH OF A MARIONETTE.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Mon May 14, 2018 1:19 pm

Big Silent Fan wrote:
Brooksie wrote: It's recently been restored by the NFSA. I hope they corrected the speed; I felt that the previous video release from the late 90s was a mite slower than it should have been.
I was just getting ready to ask if you thought the restored film was running too slow. I tried twice to watch since the story and image quality were first rate, but I struggled with the slow pacing of the scenes and while they were quite wordy, there was too much time to read the intertitles. I much enjoyed the con job where they made off with the necklet, where even the detectives were part of the ruse.

If I had access to a DVD copy, in return I could dub it to a slightly faster speed (recording at 1.3 speed).
Yes, agree to that as seemed it would have played better just a little shorter. It looks as if this was taken from an old videocassette, which may have been part of the problem. , too liked the early swindle scene, although the last section made me suspect that the cop who arrested the two gang members was a fake, also.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Mon May 14, 2018 3:46 pm

What film are you talking about?
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Brooksie » Mon May 14, 2018 4:02 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:What film are you talking about?
The Cheaters (1929/30), which earlytalkiebuffRob first mentioned a few entries upwards. It's made by the same team (Australia, and all-woman) as The Far Paradise (1928), discussed here a few months back.

We're not alone in thinking the projection speed was too slow. By coincidence, one of my parents' oldest friends is a niece of the McDonaghs, and it was the first thing she brought up with me when I mentioned having seen the video. It's just slow enough to throw off the pace entirey.

The good news is that the new restoration, which debuted in January, runs about ten minutes shorter than the version on YouTube (which does indeed come from the NFSA's video release). Hopefully this means the speed issue has been addressed. With luck, we'll see a release on DVD and/or Blu Ray, too.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by JLNeibaur » Mon May 14, 2018 8:58 pm

I was digging MICKEY on TCM last night -- I had seen it before but I enjoyed seeing it again.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Big Silent Fan » Tue May 15, 2018 1:19 pm

YouTube has just posted One Exciting Night (1922), a two hour, 25 minute film from D. W. Griffith. It is watchable, but contains no score. The opening title declares, this is "A Comedy - Drama - Mystery." Another title (after suggesting we pay close attention to the beginning because it will be used in the ending), pleads with the audience not to reveal the ending to others so they can enjoy it for themselves.

I watched this morning using my own favorite music to make it watchable. In some ways, I was reminded of another Silent, The Cat and the Canary, but there's a bit of every film I've ever seen in this as well.
The reward for watching the somewhat tedious story, was the final 20 minutes of the story when all hell breaks out. It's frankly a complete surprise.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by sepiatone » Tue May 15, 2018 2:22 pm

Sitting Bull at the Spirit Lake Massacre (1928) producer Anthony Xydias

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Jim Roots » Tue May 15, 2018 2:48 pm

sepiatone wrote:Sitting Bull at the Spirit Lake Massacre (1928) producer Anthony Xydias
So, not worth talking about?

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Big Silent Fan » Tue May 15, 2018 4:26 pm

JLNeibaur wrote:I was digging MICKEY on TCM last night -- I had seen it before but I enjoyed seeing it again.
There was quite a bit of good drama mixed in with some pretty silly comedy. I didn't make it through till the end.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Big Silent Fan » Wed May 16, 2018 4:49 pm

Theda Bara's name is well known to me, but I cannot remember seeing anything other than photos or a short clip from the lost, "Cleopatra."
The Unchastened Woman (1925) is a romantic drama concerning a wealthy couple, enjoying all that money can buy and living in a mansion. The husband is downstairs with his affectionate secretary while up in the bedroom, Theda learns from her doctor that she's pregnant. She tells the doctor she wants to tell her husband, but when she comes downstairs, she finds the two lovers embracing. After a night of sobbing, she determines to leave her husband, calling her aunt to tell her they would be traveling by boat to Europe. When the aunt tells her it's madness to leave without telling her husband about the pregnancy, Theda tells her, "There's a method to my madness." She definitely had a plan and by the end of the film (and several years later), she has her husband begging forgiveness.
A fun film to watch, the 51 minutes is without sound, but the subject and intertitles make this watchable even without sound. There are several different postings on YouTube, and I found one where the titles were not distorted.
I now have a better understanding of Theda Bara's talent. Impressive.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Thu May 17, 2018 1:09 pm

As in a Looking Glass (1903): Here's a typical early comedy short: it's little more than a practical joke, with nothing in the way of joke construction. A youngster ties a string to an old man's chair so when a woman pulls open a drawer in the next room, he'll fall over. Ha, as they used to say, ha.

Unfortunately, the geometry of the space makes little sense to me, as the door that the boy uses to enter the room where the old man is sitting leads to the room with the drawer.... and some area in back of that room. Logically there must be two doors, but cameraman Frederick Armitage has shot it so it is not visually apparent.

Armitage worked for Biograph, and it would be his fellow Biograph cameramen, A.E. Weed and George Washington "Billy" Bitzer who developed the "Biograph Right Wall" which would make apparent that third dimension onscreen. However, there's none of it here.

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Last edited by boblipton on Thu May 17, 2018 3:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Daniel Eagan » Thu May 17, 2018 1:54 pm

boblipton wrote:As in a Looking Glass (1903): Here's a typical early comedy short: it's little more than a practical joke, with nothing in the way of joke construction. A youngster ties a string to an old man's chair so when a woman pulls open a drawer in the next room, he'll fall over. Ha, as they used to say, ha.

Unfortunately, the geometry of the space makes little sense to me, as the door that the boy uses to enter the room where the old man is sitting leads to the room with the drawer.... and some area in back of that room. Logically there must be two doors, but cameraman Frederick Armitage has shot it so it is not visually apparent.

Armitage worked for Bioscope, and it would be his fellow Bioscope cameramen, A.E. Weed and George Washington "Billy" Bitzer who developed the "Bioscope Right Wall" which would make apparent that third dimension onscreen. However, there's none of it here.

Bob
We are so lucky to be able to see filmmakers finding and solving problems. Equipment and stocks improve, but they still had to figure out geography, set design, narrative construction, performance. It makes me wonder why films like The Great Train Robbery were so ideally formed when everything around them remained so primitive.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Thu May 17, 2018 2:30 pm

Daniel Eagan wrote:
boblipton wrote:As in a Looking Glass (1903): Here's a typical early comedy short: it's little more than a practical joke, with nothing in the way of joke construction. A youngster ties a string to an old man's chair so when a woman pulls open a drawer in the next room, he'll fall over. Ha, as they used to say, ha.

Unfortunately, the geometry of the space makes little sense to me, as the door that the boy uses to enter the room where the old man is sitting leads to the room with the drawer.... and some area in back of that room. Logically there must be two doors, but cameraman Frederick Armitage has shot it so it is not visually apparent.

Armitage worked for Bioscope, and it would be his fellow Bioscope cameramen, A.E. Weed and George Washington "Billy" Bitzer who developed the "Bioscope Right Wall" which would make apparent that third dimension onscreen. However, there's none of it here.

Bob
We are so lucky to be able to see filmmakers finding and solving problems. Equipment and stocks improve, but they still had to figure out geography, set design, narrative construction, performance. It makes me wonder why films like The Great Train Robbery were so ideally formed when everything around them remained so primitive.

It seems as if someone is always reinventing the wheel and astonishing people. The Lumieres had space and motion right almost from the beginning, and in America James White went around shooting .... well, cr*p. George A. Smith invented editing from 1898 from 1902, and then Griffith had to do it all over again.... and then the Russian Academicians claimed to do it for the first time too. Did Melies' film grammar have to be destroyed, or was it lack of creative storytellers willing to work with it? What about the Edison grammar that flourished until 1912, and then vanished in a couple of years? It's like looking as mass extinctions. Suppose that the meteor that landed on the geological equivalent of where Iceland is now had hit a hundred miles to the East? What if Griffith had gone to work Kalem or while he was working on Rescued from an Eagle's Nest, Dawley had said "Son, let me introduce you to Ed Porter"?

Fortunately, we live at a moment where we can look at the evidence of the film and not have to rely on the fourth-hand reports of opinions based on old, vague memories.

Bob
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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Jim Roots » Thu May 17, 2018 2:33 pm

boblipton wrote: Fortunately, we live at a moment where we can look at the evidence of the film and not have to rely on the fourth-hand reports of opinions based on old, vague memories.

Bob
But Bob, that's my entire modus operandi!

Jim

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Thu May 17, 2018 3:29 pm

Skating in Central Park (1900): People skate on a small lake. In the background are trees. The title of the film indicates that it is Central Park Lake. If so, it's been shot in a deliberately obscure manner.

This is the second early film I have looked at today that was shot by Frederick Armitage and released by American Mutoscope and Biograph and, once again, I am not impressed. It is supposed to be shot on Central Park Lake, but there is nothing that indicates to me that it is the named body of water; it is small, there are no geographical indicators, and the camera is aimed in such a way that it might be out in the country.

It's a frequent problem with early actualities, made worse by the poor quality of the prints drawn several decades ago from the Library of Congress' paper collection. Nowadays they produce much better quality prints, but until they do, this is what we are stuck with: people skating on a lake that might be Central Park.

Well, it was easier to get to Central Park from Biograph's offices in Chelsea than to head upstate, I suppose. Even so, you'd do better with a Currier & Ives print.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by boblipton » Fri May 18, 2018 4:57 pm

Le Diamant Noir (1913): Albert Dieudonné is the secretary in a rich man's house. When a rare black diamond goes missing and is discovered in a pile of papers in his room, he is dismissed in disgrace. A month later, it is discovered that a magpie has been flying into the house and moving shiny baubles around and he is cleared. However, he has disappeared on a hunting expedition to the Sudan.

Albert Machin's short feature is pure melodrama and a pretty slow-moving one at that, full of leisurely shots meant to show off handsome sets or landscapes, rather than the human drama. Dieudonné overacts and over-reacts to everything in a passive and clumsy manner, although the latter can be forgiven when he is acting with the director's prized pet leopard, Mimir. It's not a patch on Machin's didactic feature, Maudite Soit la Guerre, but the scenes set in the African jungle were just the director's meat.

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Re: What's The Last Silent Movie You Watched? [2018]

Unread post by Jess McGrath » Sat May 19, 2018 9:09 pm

I went to MOMA today to catch two rare Mary Astor 1928 silents for Fox - ROMANCE OF THE UNDERWORLD and DRESSED TO KILL. Both were directed by Irving Cummings. **Spoilers ahead**

In ROMANCE, Astor plays a "girl with a past" who is given a break by a kind-hearted police officer (Robert Elliott). She makes the most of it, and ends up marrying successful businessman John Boles. But of course, her past comes back to haunt her. Mary hadn't told her husband about her past - and I fully expected the resolution to be her having to do so. But she didn't! In fact, the same kind-hearted police officer arranged it so the person who was threatening to reveal her past... was killed by another criminal! Quite a statement about law enforcement there. And in the end, it seems Boles never finds out! Anyway, pretty good picture.

DRESSED TO KILL was certainly the more stylishly-photographed of the two, and the film that dolled up Astor to look stunning. Here she was the new girlfriend (although she referred to herself as a "stall moll" for not giving in all the way to his advances) of gangster Edmund Lowe. Turns out she's not really the criminal type, and loses her nerve during a planned robbery. Then she reveals why she's been playing along, and - as with the first movie - it's the kind-hearted efforts of Lowe that give Astor's character a second chance. While Astor was dressed gorgeously, and overall I liked this one, I found ROMANCE a little more enjoyable and a slightly better film.

Both were accompanied by Makia Matsumura, who turned in two excellent scores.

A good way to spend a rainy Saturday afternoon in NYC...

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