The greatest movie ever made

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The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:55 pm

There is, of course, no single answer to the greatest movie ever made, but the closest movie critics come is in the pick of a consensus choice once a decade in the Sight & Sound poll. It was Citizen Kane from the second poll (1962, when it replaced The Bicycle Thief) to 2002; then in 2012 Kane fell to #2 behind Vertigo (The Bicycle Thief, incidentally, ranked #33).

David Thomson has a piece in The London Review of Books suggesting that Vertigo is unlikely to top it again in 2022:
We have to be clear-eyed about Vertigo, and about what its power and influence tell us. It isn’t just that Alfred Hitchcock was devious, a fantasist, a voyeur and a predator. It isn’t just that no matter how many Harvey Weinsteins are exposed, it could never be enough to deliver justice to those who have been wronged and exploited. It isn’t even that men invented and have dominated the command and control of the movies, both as art and business: that they have been the majority of directors, producers and camera people despite, over the years, being a minority of the audience. Is what Vertigo has to tell us, beyond this history of male control, that the medium itself is in some sense male? Is there something in cinema that gives power to the predator, sitting still in the dark, watching desired and forbidden things? Something male in a system that has an actress stand on her mark, in a beautifully lit and provocatively intimate close-up, so that we can rhapsodise over her?...

I didn’t vote for Vertigo; I didn’t love it enough in 1958 or in 2012. I voted for Rear Window, which seems to me a lighter, airier, more amused study on the same theme – marriage and murder, watching and imagining. It lacks the suffocating self-pity of Vertigo, and so I like it more. I can’t see Vertigo holding the title in 2022, if the known world prevails then and remains ready to attend to another fanciful poll. It’s irrefutably clear that Vertigo is a confession to the damage done by men’s grooming of women’s desirability. And even if the film is tragic, and even if Novak’s performance more and more seems brave or poignant, I don’t think its fantasy can go unchastised.
In short, Vertigo is problematic. Never mind that what it is about, utterly and deeply, is the very problematic-ness that it embodies—the shaping of women by obsessed, Svengali-like men. You don't have to like it (it's well down my list of Hitchcocks) to think it's quite probably the best movie about that subject. But it's by a man, examining himself... and that's the problem. So he may well be right, it's not going to meet with general approval next time.

But setting that issue aside for a moment... what will win then? My thoughts:

1) Citizen Kane. Vertigo falls from its tower, Kane stays stable in Xanadu, takes #1 by default.

2) 2001. Certainly has had good press lately, and while it's hardly a film to take women very seriously, that's a bit hard to fault a movie for when humans in it in general don't count for much.

3) Tokyo Story. #3 last time, Ozu is a great humanist director, it's the consensus choice of the best Japanese film, it seems.

4) Pather Panchali. Same virtues as Tokyo Story, basically, and even less competition from the rest of Indian cinema. Plus South Asians continue to rise in prominence in British intellectual life. That said, can a movie really jump from #42 to #1?

Now I just have to find the bookmaker taking bets for 2022.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Jun 23, 2018 5:14 pm

My thought: I don't care.

I suppose this is news of some sort, although, like all polls, it has no objective basis and all the discussion in the world won't give it one. I decided some time ago that in 1893 Blacksmith Scene was the greatest movie ever made, and see no reason to constantly rethink a perfectly satisfactory conclusion.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Javier » Sat Jun 23, 2018 6:05 pm

The reason I do not make a list of favourites, in my opinion is because every film I like/love has something to offer me everytime I view it. Therefore, the thought of making a list in my opinion has become irrelevant, even though a lot of the ones I see listed in different polls are some, I keep in high regard on their artistic measures.

Hey, but I am biased. Give me a silent film anyday! :mrgreen:
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by linquist » Sat Jun 23, 2018 8:25 pm

Yes, it doesn't matter.

At the same time, there's that part of me that enjoys history, including film history and any discussion of it is a guilty pleasure to me. I had heard for some time that there had become a collective opinion that VERTIGO was considered Hitchcock's best film. In the 1950's, Hitchcock had developed the kind of reputation that Spielberg had to carry in the 1980s, that of a director who used marvelous cinematic storytelling skills for cheap thrills. The beauty of VERTIGO was that it was deeper than his more obvious tricks such as REAR WINDOW and PSYCHO. But just because Hitchcock was a great director and that VERTIGO was supposedly his best picture, doesn't make it the best picture of all time. Even in 2012, the film's and HItchcock's reputations were hinged on feminine manipulation. If this was the best that the critics could summons up in 2012, why didn't they just vote for THE BIRTH OF A NATION or PEEPING TOM? The 2012 choice boggled my mind and the #MeToo uprising only proved how wrong this choice was.
To a great degree, this list is quite esoterically cultish. The complaint was that CITIZEN KANE had been the top film too long but many of the other films, from our time, are just about as old. There is very little that is new on the list. Its like they keep rolling the same pair of dice hoping to get a new number. Heck, if they need to avoid putting CITIZEN KANE on top, there are plenty of decent choices on their list. Go for SUNRISE or 8 1/2 or GODFATHER. I've always like RASHOMON and its view of truth. That's certainly a better angle that the cinematic manipulation of women.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Frame Rate » Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:53 am

Although VERTIGO continues to be my all-time fave (I even ducked out on first-dress rehearsal for a play in which I was acting, to see the picture's initial theatrical re-issue!) my humble theory is that the film would never have achieved its near-mystical status had it not been for its lengthy withdrawal from circulation.

And how well I recall the paranoid tension in the air during a Hyde Park (Chicago) bootleg, invitation-only screening, for quite a large crowd (at the height of the FBI raids on collectors) -- as the Hitchcockian tension on the screen seemed matched by the shared fear that federal agents, guns drawn, might burst in at any moment, seize the forbidden print, and bust us all!

So now, decades later, yet other political/legal issues (the #MeToo bonfire) descend upon Hitch's masterpiece to alter its reputation, but this time downward.

Sigh. :(
If only our opinions were as variable as the pre-talkie cranking speed...

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by westegg » Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:55 am

FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLFMAN. End of debate.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Jim Roots » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:00 am

boblipton wrote:My thought: I don't care.

I suppose this is news of some sort, although, like all polls, it has no objective basis and all the discussion in the world won't give it one. I decided some time ago that in 1893 Blacksmith Scene was the greatest movie ever made, and see no reason to constantly rethink a perfectly satisfactory conclusion.

Bob
I vote for it, too. It was the original film noir.

Jim

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:33 am

Jim Roots wrote:
boblipton wrote:My thought: I don't care.

I suppose this is news of some sort, although, like all polls, it has no objective basis and all the discussion in the world won't give it one. I decided some time ago that in 1893 Blacksmith Scene was the greatest movie ever made, and see no reason to constantly rethink a perfectly satisfactory conclusion.
I vote for it, too. It was the original film noir.
I still prefer the gay frivolity of Roundhay Garden Scene. Beneath its seemingly carefree air lies layers of repressed Victorian sexuality, practically bursting at the seams.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by oldposterho » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:44 am

Frame Rate wrote:... [Vertigo] would never have achieved its near-mystical status had it not been for its lengthy withdrawal from circulation.
I agree completely. I've never understood the cult of Vertigo. For me it is a perfectly adequate thriller but other Hitchcock's like Shadow of a Doubt or even Psycho are far better films. [Ducks the slings and arrows...]

Wouldn't even attempt a greatest movie ever made selection but i wouldn't quibble with 2001 or Citizen Kane.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by westegg » Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:16 am

I still prefer the gay frivolity of Roundhay Garden Scene. Beneath its seemingly carefree air lies layers of repressed Victorian sexuality, practically bursting at the seams.[/quote]

I think the character development was a bit weak, and the ending rather abrupt, but it has a memorable quality that stands up to many, many repeat viewings.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by drednm » Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:37 am

Obviously there is no way to ever select "the greatest film of all time." Even my own personal choice changes. I'd usually pick Sunset Boulevard unless I've just watched Intolerance or Vertigo or Citizen Kane (despite the damage it did to Marion Davies' reputation. Even picking a Top Ten list is difficult.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Arndt » Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:11 am

boblipton wrote:I decided some time ago that in 1893 Blacksmith Scene was the greatest movie ever made, and see no reason to constantly rethink a perfectly satisfactory conclusion.
I find it altogether too staged. Give me ROUNDHAY GARDEN SCENE (1888) any day.
"The greatest cinematic experience is the human face and it seems to me that silent films can teach us to read it anew." - Wim Wenders

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sun Jun 24, 2018 2:15 pm

With GUS VISSER AND HIS SINGING DUCK coming close behind...

Seriously, I agree that these lists are rather pointless, as it depends on which films one has seen, how well they have been presented, one's mood / ability to appreciate and a dozen or more other factors. Plus of course the vast number of films lost, unavailable or only around in poor copies. And people judge films in different ways.

A list of favourites, is, to me, better, but it will be flexible, as new films are added, others dropped, and some films re-seen and added. Since going online, I have been able to see films which were just notes in the history books and I have no doubt more will be added. In one of his 'Around Cinemas' books, James Agate showed the reader a few lists. And how many movies do you limit it to?

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by westegg » Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:45 pm

Yes, favorites seem more of value than trying to imagine a "greatest" movie for the record. It's tough to limit favorites to ten, but after many a year it's interesting to see what movies stand the test of time in one's life, with the occasional adding and dropping. Also easier to select ten favorites per genre.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Donald Binks » Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:11 pm

I think that the original "movie moguls" would be rolling in their graves laughing to think that men of letters would be gravely intoning on the merits and influences gleaned from filmed entertainments.

One goes to the cinema, sits in the dark for a couple of hours watching a film. One is, hopefully, entertained for the duration. One then gets up, goes out of the cinema and reconnects with the usual sham drudgery of ordinary life. That's about it.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by daveboz » Sun Jun 24, 2018 9:56 pm

Although I haven’t seen the actual film, FIGHT WITH SLEDGE HAMMERS [1902], based solely on its title and poster, has just GOT to be the greatest film ever made.Image
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Arndt » Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:34 am

daveboz wrote:Although I haven’t seen the actual film, FIGHT WITH SLEDGE HAMMERS [1902], based solely on its title and poster, has just GOT to be the greatest film ever made.Image
Presumably a Handmade Films production...
"The greatest cinematic experience is the human face and it seems to me that silent films can teach us to read it anew." - Wim Wenders

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Smari1989 » Mon Jun 25, 2018 5:25 am

oldposterho wrote:
Frame Rate wrote:... [Vertigo] would never have achieved its near-mystical status had it not been for its lengthy withdrawal from circulation.
I agree completely. I've never understood the cult of Vertigo. For me it is a perfectly adequate thriller but other Hitchcock's like Shadow of a Doubt or even Psycho are far better films. [Ducks the slings and arrows...]

Wouldn't even attempt a greatest movie ever made selection but i wouldn't quibble with 2001 or Citizen Kane.
Well, there’ll be no slings and arrows from me, I agree with you. I also prefer 39 STEPS and STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, actually. It should be noted that I haven’t watched VERTIGO for several years, though.

Ultimately, such lists are not very important, of course, but I have no problem with them so long as people don’t treat them as more holy and definitive than they actually are. Many people seem to do so, however. Same thing with the Academy Awards, I guess (ducks the slings and arrows ;) ).

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by boblipton » Tue Jun 26, 2018 5:45 pm

Although it's not about films, this strip from XKCD is relevant to the discussion.

http://xkcd.com/915/" target="_blank

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by MaryGH » Tue Jun 26, 2018 7:13 pm

"Stagecoach" (1939) may rank as one of the greatest westerns ever made but when it comes to Tom Tyler I'd have to say "Tracy Rides" (1935) is the package deal for me.

Sorry no screen caps for this post

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by wich2 » Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:33 am

boblipton wrote:I decided some time ago that in 1893 Blacksmith Scene was the greatest movie ever made
NO WAY!

The honor most certainly goes to "Washday Troubles"!

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Jun 27, 2018 8:20 am

I don't think "greatest movie ever made" has any meaning, but I think you often find a lot of insight into what people valued, or wanted to be seen valuing, from movie awards. I think looking at the Sight & Sound lists tells you a lot about how intellectual critics approach the medium, which filters into writing on the subject, over time.

For instance, in 1962 there was heavy voting for a couple of films that were just a couple of years old at that point-- but people were ready to say that L'Avventura and La Dolce Vita ranked among the greatest of all time then. There's nothing like that now-- no surge of votes for films by Zyagintsev or the Dardennes brothers. The 2012 poll's top 50 has only two films from the 2000s—barely: Wong Kar-Wai's In the Mood For Love (2000) and David Lynch's Mulholland Dr. (2001). The 1990s offer three (Godard's Histoires du Cinema, Bela Tarr's Satantango, Kiarostami's Close-Up) and the 1980s exactly one—Shoah.

For me one of the most interesting observations about the latest list is that Hollywood movies started to rise in prominence in the 80s and 90s lists—Vertigo, The Searchers and Singin' in the Rain— and yet, even as Vertigo takes the top spot, overall this is such a spinach-y anti-Hollywood list, as much so as the very first one which was Soviets, Griffith and Flaherty. I admire many films and filmmakers on it, I'd consider, say, Tarkovsky's Stalker on my list, yet the overall impression is that the surest way to make the list is by making a seven-hour epic about trudging through nuclear waste, preferably in black and white in Armenia. So we have Satantango and Dreyer's Gertrud and Shoah and Jeanne Dielman (3 hours of housework with moments of sex and murder) and at #50, La Jetee, a short consisting entirely of stills, as if movement itself might be too sinfully pleasurable. As I say, I admire some of these films but as a list, what a dreary notion of cinema it suggests, one in which comedy, and music, and glamor, and pretty much anything qualifying as entertainment is absent and, it seems hard not to conclude, to be disapproved of, shunned.

That is revealing, to me, and perhaps a bit of a warning about a lot of the writing on film out there.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Jun 27, 2018 8:37 am

I think the difference, Mike, is that Nitratevillains enjoy films and don’t just admire them.

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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:12 am

I think the difference, Bob, is that they don't use texts from NitrateVille in film courses.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Jun 27, 2018 10:09 am

Mike Gebert wrote:I think the difference, Bob, is that they don't use texts from NitrateVille in film courses.
True enough, and a clear mistake. There has been some excellent writing on films here, some meaningful examination of, for example, German films during the 1920s and 1930s, some reappraisals by our members who have looked at the movies rather than simply accepting the statements printed in books. I also recall one early British talkie that was slagged in a survey, which several Nitratevillains looked at and all agreed was quite watchable. I believe it is Frederica who has made herself a bit of an authority on Nigerian Bongo movies by looking at a bunch of them. Other Nitratevillains have done exhaustive (and doubtless exhausting) viewings of all the surviving movies of Pathe Lehrman or the events of the Arbuckle scandal, and have dug into archives and libraries for primary material.... you know, what used to be called scholarly research. Money and status are not ignoble goals, but it’s easy to see how fear of loss of a paycheck or a seat at a table can blight intellectual honesty. I don’t see that here. I like my neighbors, even when I disagree with them and make a joke at their expense.

Because none of them are afraid of losing royalties on textbook sales because of what is written here.

Dave, any chance of seeing that sledgehammer movie?

Bob
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:18 am

To me the real discovery of silent film stuff on the internet, going back to AMS, was that there was a parallel world of scholarship. In universities and in courses and to some extent in film societies and repertory theaters, there was the world of academic scholarship— which I don't reject categorically; one of these days I'll finish David Bordwell's fantastic book on 40s movie style and interview him, I hope— but which certainly had a tendency to write theory without seeing movies, and to get lost in certain weeds, from leftist polemics (all that Godard, still) to semiotics and my favorite interfaith baseball team, Christian Metz.

The parallel world was fans and collectors and old movie festivals producing vast works of genuine scholarship outside the academic community on silent comedy and the like. And it's hard not to love the guys and gals who did it for love and shared their love. And it's been a huge boon that that sort of thing has flourished, and largely won a populist victory, as new ways of communicating online outside the university publishing world have popped up.

Still, the Sight & Sound polls remind us that Alexander yet has worlds to conquer.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:52 am

boblipton wrote:Although it's not about films, this strip from XKCD is relevant to the discussion.

http://xkcd.com/915/" target="_blank" target="_blank
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by daveboz » Wed Jun 27, 2018 12:58 pm

boblipton wrote:
Dave, any chance of seeing that sledgehammer movie?
======

Bob, I have good news regarding FIGHT WITH SLEDGE HAMMERS [1902]. Inspired by the examples of LONDON AFTER MIDNIGHT and GREED, I am exploring the viability, via crowd-funding, of recreating the entire lost film with just one still. Will report back the day after March 31st.
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Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by boblipton » Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:53 pm

Mike Gebert wrote:To me the real discovery of silent film stuff on the internet, going back to AMS, was that there was a parallel world of scholarship. In universities and in courses and to some extent in film societies and repertory theaters, there was the world of academic scholarship— which I don't reject categorically; one of these days I'll finish David Bordwell's fantastic book on 40s movie style and interview him, I hope— but which certainly had a tendency to write theory without seeing movies, and to get lost in certain weeds, from leftist polemics (all that Godard, still) to semiotics and my favorite interfaith baseball team, Christian Metz.

The parallel world was fans and collectors and old movie festivals producing vast works of genuine scholarship outside the academic community on silent comedy and the like. And it's hard not to love the guys and gals who did it for love and shared their love. And it's been a huge boon that that sort of thing has flourished, and largely won a populist victory, as new ways of communicating online outside the university publishing world have popped up.

Still, the Sight & Sound polls remind us that Alexander yet has worlds to conquer.

Do I reject academic scholarship categorically? I think that academic scholarship has played a role in keeping these old films alive. I think that, like science fiction in academia, the impulse towards academic scholarship arose and was nurtured by the sort of people who populate Nitrateville nowadays: William Everson at NYU, Kevin Brownlow at the BFI, our own deeply missed Chris Jacobs, Chris Stockslager, who's seeking advice for his curriculum on silent horror.

Yet any organization acquires its own politics -- take another look at Mr. Thomson's quote that you cited to kick off this thread and tell me it's not all about politics! -- and the politics of academia, like those of most people, is alien to me. Far too much of it is an appeal to authority, where the "right" answer is the one in the textbook. I'm not that sort of guy. I'm the guy who wants to know for himself. Tell me that L. Ron Hubbard's Battlefield Earth is a Dianetics tract and I'll slog my way through all 800 pages and discover a poorly edited piece of outdated pulp SF. Have two people quote Adam's Smith's The Wealth of Nations to entirely different conclusions and I'll take a month to read it and find it doesn't support either. Tell me that all of German cinema from 1918 through 1945 is proto-Fascist or Fascist and I'll club together with some like-minded friends, buy an assortment and discover, nah, they're not.

Some of you may recall how I slagged Hitler's Hollywood, a documentary about German cinema from 1933-1945. I posted the review (edited at my leisure to make it more readable, not to change the content) to the Internet Movie Database. I checked the listing yesterday and discovered someone else had also written a supportive review. It reads:
In 105 minutes Ruediger Suchsland's 'Hitler's Hollywood' provides a startling retrospective of German cinema under the skillfull hand of Hitler's propaganda mage who was Josef Goebbels. As Reichminister for Propaganda and National Enlightenemnt, he had total control of cinema, radio, press and theatre. Evil genius that he was, he had a deep intuitive understanding of mass psychology, and in 'Hitler's Hollywood' we see a large swathe of Nazi controlled films from 1933-to 1945, when the first Oscar winner Emil Jannings was in the midst of staring in a film. With great intelligence, we also see how the Nazis through talented film makers out did Hollywood in romantic comedies, musicales and extolling the 'virtues' of the 'master race' in physical beauty. And yet, the dark eyed Swedish singer Zarah Leander appeared in musicales with military themes, or the German penchant for exotic Slavs or Gypsies. And yet, her career in post war Europe, there she was with a number one hit 'Wunderbar', sung in English. Her sultry, deep throat voice still even today has not lost its mystery and allure. [See, YouTune]. Hans Detlef Sierck's 'La Habanera' made her a star and a household name. Sierck remade himself after the war, and much lionised in Hollywood as Douglas Sirk. There he was the masterly eye behind luscious romantic films like 'Magnificent Obsession' and 'All Heaven Allows'. He honed his technique at the Ufa Studios and theatre, and the influence of Goebbels ideas found its way in Hollywood, perhaps. Popular singers like Hans Albers who sang of and longed for the South Seas, transitioned to a postwar career without a hiccup. Suchsland does make a seamless cloth of Nazi cinema from the 1930s to the change of fortunes of defeat in Russia and the collapse of the Third Reich. Films became more realistic, less romantic and cotton candy. One thing remained a red thread: anti-Semitism. 'Jud Suess' by Van Harlan, with his wife, Krista Soederbaum, is an infamous anti-Semitic film that pulls no punches as an odious film, yet one extolling Nazi pathological hatred of Jews. And, he, too, survived the war, and continued to make film until his death in West Germany. Goebbels understood 'soft power', and German films flooded European markets as they did in America's ethnic picture houses that spoke to 'benign' anti-Semitism that flourished in Europe and the US. Even Ingrid Bergman as an ingenue appeared in a German film before she left for Hollywood. Suchsland script alludes to her guilt, which maght have been, and he repurchasing her guilt by playing Isle in 'Casablanca'? A reviewer cannot do justice to 'Hitler's Hollywood' but strongly suggest you go see it, and visually and emotionally and intellectually absorb the dazzling cross section of 'Hitler's Hollywood'. And this documentary is a cautionary tale of techniques that used today. 'Caveat emptor!'
I apologize for it being a single paragraph, but that's how it appeared. I consider it not a review of the movie so much as a history of German cinema in and of itself, but let that go. If you read it, did you notice the clear factual error that I did? That Detlaff Sierck "remade himself after the War ... as Douglas Sirk"? The clear implication was that he spent the War in Germany. In fact, he left Germany in 1937 because his second wife was Jewish, made movies in France and Holland, came to the US in 1941, directed Hitler's Children as Douglas Sirk, which was released in 1943, when, I am reliably informed, the War was still ongoing.

What are the sources of this reviewer's facts? Has he bothered to check them? Or has he simply accepted an authority?

I will accept timely eyewitness testimony, but when an opinion, such as this review, conflicts with facts, my conclusion is that the opinion is nonsense. Far too much academic analysis is based on faulty data. A recent episode of Adam Ruins Everything (Series 2, Episode 15 "Adam Ruins Science") discusses how a lot of results published in scientific journals these days cannot be reproduced, nor is much funding available for the unexciting task of running confirming experiments. When Kracauer wrote his book a dozen years after he left Berlin, based on what he remembered from before the War, I consider his memories suspect. When Rudiger Suchsland makes Hitler's Hollywood and announces that he went through the movies looking for confirmation of Kracauer's ideas, my thought is "Confirmation bias!" When I read the above "review", my cynicism overwhelmed me and I wondered if the writer was a student in one of Herr Rudiger's classes. If so, were I Herr Professor, I would grade it a C. As I learned in my graduate days, the way to get an A in a humanities course was to agree 95% with my professor, but disagree on one minor point. This would show that I was a sound and independent thinker. It would have been a B- except for the chronological error.

Neither will I accept an opinion as to artistic validity as true. I've got my own taste. Let me take a look at it and I'll make up my own mind.

So do I reject academia categorically? Well, I'll look there for ideas. I'll look anywhere for ideas. However, your working space being in an ivory tower doesn't make your opinion more valid. Unless, of course, you're talking about the problems of getting people who keep your office clean. Do they use Crest or Colgate to scrub the floors, or is that something for the cleaning lady to worry about?

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Jul 01, 2018 11:45 am, edited 3 times in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

earlytalkiebuffRob
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Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: The greatest movie ever made

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Wed Jun 27, 2018 2:44 pm

A long time ago I recall seeing a 1929 British short called ODD NUMBERS, which features a gentleman plating the piano with his nose. Surely a contender...

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