the lost squardron

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Harlett O'Dowd
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the lost squardron

Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:01 pm

finally - and I do mean finally - caught up with The Lost Squadron.

So - tempting a repeat of my swastika question from Cinecon - was Robert Armstrong really flipping Dix the bird - or did that mean something else back then too?

dr.giraud
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Re: the lost squardron

Unread post by dr.giraud » Mon Oct 06, 2008 9:50 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:finally - and I do mean finally - caught up with The Lost Squadron.

So - tempting a repeat of my swastika question from Cinecon - was Robert Armstrong really flipping Dix the bird - or did that mean something else back then too?
I haven't watched it in 10 or 12 years, but I do remember Armstrong giving the middle-finger salute to Dix. Since I've never seen it in another pre-1970s movie, I would guess it meant the same thing back then! (In the late 70s/early 80s comedy Just Tell Me What You Want, Peter Weller gives Alan King the finger by using said finger, discreetly, to adjust his glasses. Unmistakable, but it made it past network TV censors.)
dr. giraud

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Harold Aherne
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Unread post by Harold Aherne » Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:09 am

If you watch closely in "Speedy" (during the amusement park sequence) you'll notice that Lloyd gives his own reflection the middle finger after noticing the paint on his coat.

In William Haines's last film "The Marines are Coming" (1934, Mascot) I'm pretty sure there's a gag about "giving the bird", though here it involves the stuffed variety and I don't recall any gesture being made.

-Harold

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silentfilm
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Unread post by silentfilm » Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am

In the Warner Brothers cartoon A Tale of Two Kitties (1942) two cats named Babbit and Catstello are trying to catch Tweety Bird. Babbit yells at Catstello, "Give me the bird! Give me the bird!". Catstello says, "If the Hays Office would only let me, I'd give him the bird!".

Marvin Loback gives Snub Pollard the "finger" in Springtime Saps (1929).

Ben Turpin also uses the gesture in A Clever Dummy (1917).

David Hayes' website has a lot of examples, but it is hard to navigate and impossible to post a direct link to the examples. It has a comprehensive list of production code violations though.

Jim Gettys
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Unread post by Jim Gettys » Fri Oct 10, 2008 12:19 am

William Wellman managed to include a blatant Technicolor bird in Nothing Sacred (1937). At a benefit show honoring the "doomed" Hazel Flagg, MC Frank Fay introduces several "Heroines of History", all on horseback(!), including "Katinka, who saved Holland by putting her finger in the dyke." He coyly adds, "Show them the finger, babe." Katinka (Jinx Falkenburg) then obediently displays the neatly bandaged middle finger of her right hand.

Jim Gettys

Richard M Roberts
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Unread post by Richard M Roberts » Fri Oct 10, 2008 3:05 am

Marvin Loback gives Snub Pollard the "finger" in Springtime Saps (1929).
Correction, it is not Loback who gives Snub "the bird", it is another actor to whom Snub has stolen a cigar from, which then explodes.

RICHARD M ROBERTS

Brent Walker
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Unread post by Brent Walker » Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:42 am

Anyone who just attended Cinecon saw Harold Lloyd flip the bird to his own funhouse mirror image in SPEEDY.

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