What is the last film you watched? (2018)

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boblipton
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:48 am

Over the past week I have by chance looked at three movies set in Malaysia and environs: Crazy Rich Asians, a modern fairy tale set in Singapore among the Chinese super-rich; Trip to Borneo, a travelogue from 1907, in which Chinese workers perform grunt labor; and The Chinese Bungalow (1940), in which an improbably cast Paul Lukas is a rich Chinese man who marries touring singer Kay Walsh, takes her to his home in the jungle, then brings in her sister, Jane Baxter to alleviate her loneliness. In the meantime, the two women have fallen in love with two stiff-lipped British brothers, played by Robert and Wallace Douglas (who were no relations in real life).

It was the third and final screen version of a novel by Marion Osmond, directed by George King, now best remembered for helming the Tod Slaughter melodramas in the 1930s. It's full of the standard British racist casting that didn't go out of style for many a year; Christopher Lee was still playing Fu Manchu in 1969, after all. Yet Lukas' character is clearly wronged and he is a gentleman about it.... assuming you accept that wives are property, of course, which since I am writing this in 2018, they are not, of course.

In any case, this is a technically fine movie, with some good camerawork throughout by Hone Glendinning and a story that hangs together, thanks to editor Jack Harris. This was not an A movie, but it was produced by British Lion, when it was making a run upwards towards In Which We Serve. It turns out that when you gave him a budget, King could produce a decent film, even if his taste and morals seems out of date almost eighty years later.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:49 am

I saw Bon Voyage! (1962) when I was a kid. I remembered liking it. Watched it again last night. How times (and everything else) have changed! Leaden and snail-paced story of Indiana family taking a trip to Paris via an ocean liner stars Fred MacMurray and Jane Wyman (in their only feature film together) as the parents of teens Amy (Deborah Walley) and Elliott (Tommy Kirk) and kiddie Skipper (Kevin Corcoran). The older kids are sullen and more interested in pairing off than in a trip with the parents. MacMurray comes off best as the hapless father trying to understand "this modern generation" while Wyman seems interested only in shopping and dressing up. So many bizarre elements for a Disney film. MacMurray gets drunk on absinthe (though it's never identified). Wyman gets hit on by a lecher (Ivan Desny). Wyman declares Walley a "cold fish" and is pleased she's taken an interest in a sullen rich boy (Michael Callan). Kirk grows a mustache and chases girls all over Paris and almost gets tricked into marrying one. There's virtually nothing in this Disney film for kids. Why I liked it I have no idea. It's an extended sitcom (mostly) for adults who can cluck their tongues over the kids' learning a lesson or two and growing up. The film won 2 Oscar nomnations: one for sound, one for costumes. Wyman wears some of the ugliest hats ever seen and Walley wows (in a bad way) in her two-piece bathing suit with crisscross straps attaching the bra to the panty with a giant bow to cover her navel. Oscar nomination my ass!

Reports claim this was not a happy shoot. MacMurray and Kirk (feeling his adult oats and coming out as gay) didn't get along. Kirk also didn't get along with Wyman who didn't like Wally since her role was originally supposed to be played by Pollyanna co-star, Hayley Mills (whom apparently she did like). Seems like Kevin Corcoran had a good time. My mother named my brother Kevin after Corcoran. What was SHE thinking?
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Richard P. May » Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:13 am

A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH (1946) I bought the newly remastered BluRay of this wonderful fantasy, which includes several interviews with people involved in its production or restoration. Having a first hand interview with cinematographer Jack Cardiff is most informative.
I have been a fan of this film since its release in the U.S. in 1947. It always had some problems in the black and white sections, since it was printed in the Technicolor dye transfer process (called Dye Monochrome on the main title). The slightest mismatches in the printing elements caused color tints, so some scenes didn't match their adjoining shots.
This restoration from Sony, via Criterion, is superb. They used the original Technicolor negatives, and with today's technology are able to eliminate the above glitches.
Performances by David Niven, Kim Hunter, Roger Livesey, Raymond Massey, Marius Goring and many others fit perfectly. I guess the best classification would be to call it a fantasy.
The U.S. release title was STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:17 pm

drednm wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:49 am
I saw Bon Voyage! (1962) when I was a kid. I remembered liking it. Watched it again last night. How times (and everything else) have changed! Leaden and snail-paced story of Indiana family taking a trip to Paris via an ocean liner stars Fred MacMurray and Jane Wyman (in their only feature film together) as the parents of teens Amy (Deborah Walley) and Elliott (Tommy Kirk) and kiddie Skipper (Kevin Corcoran). The older kids are sullen and more interested in pairing off than in a trip with the parents. MacMurray comes off best as the hapless father trying to understand "this modern generation" while Wyman seems interested only in shopping and dressing up. So many bizarre elements for a Disney film. MacMurray gets drunk on absinthe (though it's never identified). Wyman gets hit on by a lecher (Ivan Desny). Wyman declares Walley a "cold fish" and is pleased she's taken an interest in a sullen rich boy (Michael Callan). Kirk grows a mustache and chases girls all over Paris and almost gets tricked into marrying one. There's virtually nothing in this Disney film for kids. Why I liked it I have no idea. It's an extended sitcom (mostly) for adults who can cluck their tongues over the kids' learning a lesson or two and growing up. The film won 2 Oscar nomnations: one for sound, one for costumes. Wyman wears some of the ugliest hats ever seen and Walley wows (in a bad way) in her two-piece bathing suit with crisscross straps attaching the bra to the panty with a giant bow to cover her navel. Oscar nomination my ass!

Reports claim this was not a happy shoot. MacMurray and Kirk (feeling his adult oats and coming out as gay) didn't get along. Kirk also didn't get along with Wyman who didn't like Wally since her role was originally supposed to be played by Pollyanna co-star, Hayley Mills (whom apparently she did like). Seems like Kevin Corcoran had a good time. My mother named my brother Kevin after Corcoran. What was SHE thinking?
Interesting that both the 'older teens' were about twenty when this was made. And the bit about Walley's bathing suit reminds me of some dodgy stuff with Hayley Mills's panties in THE PARENT TRAP. Surprised her Dad didn't put a stop on that scene.

Never seen the film anyway (I was five in 1962) and it's one of those Disneys which is rarely revived.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:54 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:17 pm
drednm wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:49 am
I saw Bon Voyage! (1962) when I was a kid. I remembered liking it. Watched it again last night. How times (and everything else) have changed! Leaden and snail-paced story of Indiana family taking a trip to Paris via an ocean liner stars Fred MacMurray and Jane Wyman (in their only feature film together) as the parents of teens Amy (Deborah Walley) and Elliott (Tommy Kirk) and kiddie Skipper (Kevin Corcoran). The older kids are sullen and more interested in pairing off than in a trip with the parents. MacMurray comes off best as the hapless father trying to understand "this modern generation" while Wyman seems interested only in shopping and dressing up. So many bizarre elements for a Disney film. MacMurray gets drunk on absinthe (though it's never identified). Wyman gets hit on by a lecher (Ivan Desny). Wyman declares Walley a "cold fish" and is pleased she's taken an interest in a sullen rich boy (Michael Callan). Kirk grows a mustache and chases girls all over Paris and almost gets tricked into marrying one. There's virtually nothing in this Disney film for kids. Why I liked it I have no idea. It's an extended sitcom (mostly) for adults who can cluck their tongues over the kids' learning a lesson or two and growing up. The film won 2 Oscar nomnations: one for sound, one for costumes. Wyman wears some of the ugliest hats ever seen and Walley wows (in a bad way) in her two-piece bathing suit with crisscross straps attaching the bra to the panty with a giant bow to cover her navel. Oscar nomination my ass!

Reports claim this was not a happy shoot. MacMurray and Kirk (feeling his adult oats and coming out as gay) didn't get along. Kirk also didn't get along with Wyman who didn't like Wally since her role was originally supposed to be played by Pollyanna co-star, Hayley Mills (whom apparently she did like). Seems like Kevin Corcoran had a good time. My mother named my brother Kevin after Corcoran. What was SHE thinking?
Interesting that both the 'older teens' were about twenty when this was made. And the bit about Walley's bathing suit reminds me of some dodgy stuff with Hayley Mills's panties in THE PARENT TRAP. Surprised her Dad didn't put a stop on that scene.

Never seen the film anyway (I was five in 1962) and it's one of those Disneys which is rarely revived.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Sep 01, 2018 8:30 pm

Du Rififi à Paname aka The Upper Hand (1968): No, it's not Panama; Paname is slang for Paris. It's from another August le Breton movie, and it stars Jean Gabin, with a big role for Gert Frobe and a featured part for a coin-flipping George Raft. If Paramount was producing Geezer westerns in the States, then perhaps this was a Geezer Gangster flick.

Gabin and Frobe have a racket smuggling gold into Tokyo and antiquities out of Japan. They use people with no police records and have settled on Claudio Brook, a reporter. What they don't know is that he is an undercover agent investigating their racket, and one that Frobe has smuggling spare parts into Cuba. As he worms his way into Gabin's graces, some one is trying to muscle in on the racket, blowing up associates in Munich and London. Frobe wants to abandon the Tokyo run for another, better idea. Gabin wants to keep going until the new one is paying. Nadja Tiller, Frobe's wife and Gabin's ex-lover, wants to fight.

It's still le Breton's world as first seen in Jules Dassin's movie, only bigger, brighter and in wide screen. Little fish have gotten bigger and attracted the notice of big fish on both sides of the law, but it's still guys with some rules against guys with none. The time for such movies was passing. The New Wave had no use for movies like this, but so long as as Gabin was willing to appear in them, they would still keep making them; and I will still watch and enjoy them fifty years later.

Bob
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by greta de groat » Sat Sep 01, 2018 9:45 pm

R Michael Pyle wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 6:22 am
boblipton wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 5:13 am
greta de groat wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:07 am


Well, that was weird. I couldn't understand a thing Farnum said. And, sure enough, he had the Quebequois uniform--weirdly pattered pants, sash, stocking cap, blanket coat. I actually kind of liked the blanket coat, even though it sometimes looked like he had a target on his butt. It was fun in a bizarre sort of way, thanks for alerting us to it.

greta
I did make a couple of false starts with the movie, since it sounded like he had learned to speak Joual from a German. However, once I began to run it simultaneously through whatever it is in my brain that translates Mel Blanc doing Pepe Le Pew and understanding Jamaicans when they speak their creole, I could get about two words out of three.

I suspect that accent is what you get when you took an authentic early 19th-century Quebecois, ran him through a tyro writer's imagination, then took his younger son's accent and ran that through about forty years of actors trouping through the country, trying to learn their sides on a moving train.

Bob
We had a thread here back in 2013 called "Early Talkies with the Most Unique Dialog Styles". I had watched "The Drifter" priorly, and said this in my statement I was making:
..." "The Drifter", and, no, it's certainly not the worst film ever made - in fact, it's quite interesting - but I watched that film about a year and a half ago, and the only thing I thought of when it ended was, "Well, that was an interesting film lesson, but I'll probably not try my patience with it again." You see exactly the same kind of thing in the previous year's "The Painted Desert" and "Ten Nights in a Barroom", both starring Farnum! Thank God William Boyd and Clark Gable are in "The Painted Desert"; otherwise, it's almost unbearable. And "Ten Nights in a Barroom IS unbearable - mainly because of Farnum's delivery in his spoken parts. And that's a shame, because his silent Western "Drag Harlan" (1920) is one of my all time favorite Westerns!"
To me he sounded like he was trying to cross French with Irish. There were several other Quebequoise characters whose accents were not as bad, but you could tell who they were supposed to be by the blanket coats and by making sure every pronoun, she was she. I actually watched Ten Nights in a Barroom the night before and thought it was not too bad. I generally enjoy Farnum in talkies despite his old fashioned style, or maybe because of it. He always plays big. And in a film like Du Barry, Woman of Passion, that has dialog that sounds like it's right out of Clyde Fitch, it's the old timers like Farnum, Bosworth, and Alison Skipworth that know how to chew the scenery with style, while Norma Talmadge and Conrad Nagel end up sounding a bit silly. But this one was quite over the top. And not well directed on top of it.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:01 am

Since the dawn of the gangster/crime/noir genre (and no, I'm not going to open an argument about when that was), one of the favourite storylines has been the guy who takes the rap for the gang, serves his time, and emerges looking for either revenge, reward, or his cut of the original pie plus royalties for all the time he spent in hoosegow.

A forgotten example has been revived by Kino Lorber, and the reason it was revived (I'll bet) is the cast: Burt Lancaster as the sucker released after 14 years in jail, Kirk Douglas as the partner who has no intention of sharing the spoils accumulated during those years, and Lizabeth Scott as the gal who finds herself the meat in this spoiled sandwich. Along for the ride are such noir stalwarts as Mike Mazurki, Marc Lawrence, and Wendell Corey.

A great cast, but they each seem to be playing in a different film. Douglas is the smooth, smiling slickster as he was in so many of these kinds of films, but his ruthlessness is missing: he seems physically wimpy and psychologically unprepossessing. Lancaster is so intense, you would think he was in White Heat. A key scene is his invasion of Douglas' office with four henchmen in an attempt to force Kirk to surrender half-control of his empire: bookkeeper Corey discombobulates him with explanations about three different holding companies owning the empire and being unable to transfer Kirk's share due to corporate bylaws, and it's supposed to be dark comedy, but Lancaster has invested so much energy into his performance that he sucks out all the irony.

Scott played a lot of dirty femmes fatales. Here, she is on the other side of the moral fence, a good girl with the bad luck to be in love with a bad guy but the good luck to find the good bad man of her dreams. If that sounds self-contradictory, so is her performance: one moment she's the smiling romantic "girl", the next moment she realizes she's in a vicious crime film and accordingly tries to act cynical and "hard". Still, she's an arresting woman and it's hard to take your eyes off her even when Burt is busily intensing circles around her. It took me quite a while to remember who she reminds me of physically: Barbara Bain, with the same kind of subtle smile that transforms a "nice face" into an alluring, irresistible one. The contrast between her blonde hair and black eyebrows helps, too.

This is an average crime film, with not much violence in it, and not much growth in the lead character (Lancaster, but Douglas too), worth watching for the cast alone.

Jim

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by FrankFay » Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:46 am

You didn't give the title - I WALK ALONE (1948)
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Frame Rate » Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:03 pm

Oh, that Liz Scott flick, the one that prompted The Nation's James Agee (who by the end of the 40s had had his fill of noir-ish, betrayal-and-revenge tales) to issue one of his most facile, play-on-the-title fulminations:

"The picture deserves, like four out of five other movies, to walk alone, tinkle a little bell, and cry 'Unclean, unclean'". :twisted:
If only our opinions were as variable as the pre-talkie cranking speed...

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by wingate » Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:31 pm

The Man Without A Face 1935,a quota quickiemail, which has a dramatic role for Moore Mariott. An ingenious twist for the ending is rather far fetched.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Sun Sep 02, 2018 1:32 pm

FrankFay wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:46 am
You didn't give the title - I WALK ALONE (1948)
I'm sorry, your response must be given in the form of a question. That will cost you $1,000.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Sun Sep 02, 2018 1:35 pm

Frame Rate wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:03 pm
Oh, that Liz Scott flick, the one that prompted The Nation's James Agee (who by the end of the 40s had had his fill of noir-ish, betrayal-and-revenge tales) to issue one of his most facile, play-on-the-title fulminations:

"The picture deserves, like four out of five other movies, to walk alone, tinkle a little bell, and cry 'Unclean, unclean'". :twisted:
Isn't that what he said about The Untouchables?

Jim

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sun Sep 02, 2018 2:38 pm

Today's film with my cousin was The Wife (2017). Jonathan Price and Genn Close can't sleep. The phone rings. It's Sweden. He's won the Nobel Prize for literature. The rest of the movie shows their interaction with family, friends, the trip to accept the award and encounters with a smarmy Christian Slater, who wants to write Price's biography.... and whose research has indicated a disturbing theory as to the source of the great novels.

It's a magnificent cast, and the movie is certainly worth it for them. I have thought Price a great actor ever since Something Wicked This Way Comes and the first time I saw Miss Close was in the one-man show Barnum, in which Jim Dale easily held the stage against a plethora of jugglers, acrobats, singers and two pianos playing ragtime.... except when Miss Close as Charity Barnum strode onto stage. If it weren't for Meryl Streep, she would be America's premiere movie actress, and for my money she should be... although Frances McDormand is a worthy competitor.

This is clearly an Oscar Bait movie, and Miss Close gives a great performance. Nonetheless, given the trailers that preceded it at the theater, it's clear that this year's Oscar Bait movie is going to be about women who sacrifice themselves for others with no public reward. Despite the great performances, I'm sick of them already.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Donald Binks » Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:33 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:01 am

"hoosegow"

"slickster"

Jim
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Frame Rate » Sun Sep 02, 2018 5:08 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 1:35 pm
Isn't that what he said about The Untouchables?
[/quote]

I wouldn't put it past Agee to recycle one of his own bon mots, but both the TV series and the feature film came out well after his own final reel.
If only our opinions were as variable as the pre-talkie cranking speed...

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:10 pm

Dateline Diamonds (1965) is an odd mix of a diamond heist set against the British music scene. A group's manager (Kenneth Cope) is blackmailed by a former military commander (William Lucas) into helping smuggle stolen diamonds out of the country via a floating radio station (outside the legal limits) that hosts various music stars. A copper (Conrad Phillips) uses information from his music-crazed daughter (Anna Carteret) about the appearances of some music acts where a big switch off of diamonds is about to happen. The diamonds are inside music tape boxes. We get to see Kiki Dee, The Small Faces, and a girl group called The Chantelles (all very good). Less good are Mark Richardson and Rey Anton (never heard of them). Nothing special but watchable because of the music. Burnell Tucker plays a help DJ and Patsy Rowlands is funny as a rather loopy witness.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:51 pm

Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman is a fun 99-minute movie about the first black cop (John David Washington, son of Denzel) on the police force of Colorado Springs in the early 70s, and how, bored one day, he answers an ad from the KKK (this is the summer's second black movie about using your "white voice" on the phone) and then has to enlist a white cop—a Jewish white cop, as it happens, played by the always-impressive Adam Driver—to be him in person and infiltrate the local Klansmen (a sorry, but nevertheless well-armed and dangerous bunch).

Unfortunately it runs 136 minutes, and it's directed by both of the Spike Lees. The Spike Lee who is a lively Scorsese-influenced filmmaker, has a sharp eye for black culture and style (the sister who plays the Angela Davis type, Laura Harrier, could make the afro popular again), and a rollicking sense of humor directs the 99 minute cop movie, and is actually quite ambivalent about black political orthodoxy (Boots Riley, director of the other "white voice" movie, was as appalled that Lee seems to be saying cops are necessary sometimes as Murray Kempton was 30 years ago that Lee seemed to be saying that rioting was not, in fact, the Right Thing sometimes).

But that Lee let the Spike Lee who thinks he's Oliver Stone extend the movie with extended clips from both Gone With the Wind and The Birth of a Nation, and long stretches of radio rants by David Duke (an effectively slick and banal Topher Grace) making a case for white identity politics, and a too-long speech scene of Stokely Carmichael (Corey Hawkins) making a case for shooting cops, and Harry Belafonte turning up to give a long account of a 1910s lynching (in case you were still waffling by the two-hour mark on whether the Klan was good or bad), and a coda of the march in Charlottesville last year in case the Nixon Now posters at the Klan meeting weren't convincing enough that All Republicans Are Basically The KKK... the director's cut DVD will probably have Frederick Douglas and an account of the CIA-backed overthrow of Patrice Lumumba to boot. Not that some of the points aren't well taken, but at some point you either need to trust that you're dramatizing a tale sufficiently, or you don't, in which case you should just deliver a speech, like Chaplin in The Great Dictator.

And even he only had one of them in his movie.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Sep 03, 2018 4:36 am

"My movie about a Black guy pretending to be White on the telephone is much better than the other movie about a Black guy pretending to be White on the telephone. You should pay to see my movie, not his."

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:25 am

Frame Rate wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 5:08 pm
Jim Roots wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 1:35 pm
Isn't that what he said about The Untouchables?
I wouldn't put it past Agee to recycle one of his own bon mots, but both the TV series and the feature film came out well after his own final reel.
[/quote]

Whoosh! Right over your head, eh?

Jim

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:26 am

Donald Binks wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:33 pm
Jim Roots wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:01 am

"hoosegow"

"slickster"

Jim
Que?
Aw, 23-skidoo, daddio!

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by oldposterho » Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:08 am

It was very strange hearing "Over the Rainbow" as a musical leitmotif throughout 1941's I Wake Up Screaming, a wrong-man-accused-of-murder proto-noir from 20th Century Fox. I was under the impression that its popularity wasn't as omnipresent in its contemporary time as it was later on but apparently not. Even odder is that MGM let Fox use it so soon after The Wizard of Oz was released, perhaps that speaks to the dismal performance of TWoO and MGM was just trying to recoup costs, (assuming Fox paid for its use and didn't just crib it).

Anyway, it was my first Betty Grable flick and I now see why our boys so enjoyed watching her. She's actually a pretty good actress and obviously looks terrific in the obligatory bathing suit scene, effectively, if not obviously, inserted into the story. There's also some nice work from the rest of the cast including perpetually aggrieved Elisha Cook and a particularly nasty Laird Cregar as an aggressive cop. Some terrific cinematography by Edward Cronjager adds to the proceedings.

Not top tier, but worth seeing.

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Smari1989 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:43 am

Watched HOOK LINE AND SINKER (1930) with Wheeler & Woolsey last night. I think this may actually be the first full starring feature with W & W I've seen, I can only remember seeing a few bits and pieces before. Yeah, I know I'm late to the party here, but I've heard so many mixed reviews of the team, and there's so much in the world to watch and explore... but gotta say, I found it surprisingly entertaining. No, they don't have the warmth and humanity of Laurel & Hardy, but then, what comedy team does? There's definitely chemistry between them, and Woolsey in particular is an excellent performer. Found several laughs in some of the "naughty," very pre-Code type of jokes throughout. Plan to check them out more now.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Donald Binks » Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:26 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:26 am
Donald Binks wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:33 pm
Jim Roots wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:01 am

"hoosegow"

"slickster"

Jim
Que?
Aw, 23-skidoo, daddio!

Jim
Thank you for your most erudite translation. (I can't help it if I can't understand Canadian terminologies!) :(
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she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:29 pm

wingate wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 12:31 pm
The Man Without A Face 1935,a quota quickiemail, which has a dramatic role for Moore Mariott. An ingenious twist for the ending is rather far fetched.
Nice little film though, and not too long...

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:53 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:26 pm
Jim Roots wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:26 am
Donald Binks wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 3:33 pm


Que?
Aw, 23-skidoo, daddio!

Jim
Thank you for your most erudite translation. (I can't help it if I can't understand Canadian terminologies!) :(
That’s Canadians for you. Always impeccable manners.

Bob
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To see the world as the world's not.

-- A.E. Housman

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:57 pm

Watched three over the weekend, MAZURKA (1935), A GAME OF DEATH (1945) and AS THE EARTH TURNS (1934) but will just do the last-named for the time being.

AS THE EARTH TURNS could easily be confused with THE WORLD MOVES ON and THE WORLD CHANGES from the same year, not to mention the mammoth soap which ran for over half a century, AS THE WORLD TURNS. This one, based on a (presumably) popular book, is set in a farming community in Maine, where the arrival of a Polish family threatens to cause a bit of a stir amongst the two other families. The 'decent' family lives well and is more or less run by one of the daughters, Jen, played by Jean Muir. This family is really two in one, as the husband (David Landau) and wife (Clara Blandick) have both been widowed. This causes a bit of confusion when Blandick's miserable daughter (Dorothy Appleby) makes a play fro Landau's student son (William Janney) when one thinks "Surely not!" until one realises that incest is not on the menu*. Appleby is seen here as selfish, and will stop at literally nothing to escape from what she sees as a miserable existence, this jeapordising Jen and Stan's happiness near the end.

Landau's brother (Arthur Hohl) is the 'head' of the 'no-good' family, being shown as lazy, greedy and incompetent, always being bailed out of trouble. Saying that, he must be good at something as there are several children in tow!

The incoming family is originally seen as a bit of a threat to the others, but soon show themselves as hard-working and decent. Unfortunately, the father falls ill due to the work, and the family go back to the city, leaving son Stan (Donald Woods) in charge of the farm, and he has taken a shine to Jen...

Perhaps a bit ordinary and simple-hearted in content, AS THE EARTH TURNS is nonetheless a pleasing film, which doesn't hesitate to show the downside of farm life. What threatened to be rather mawkish, comes over as an interesting, human story which manages to keep one's attention reasonably occupied throughout.

*unlike British soaps such as 'Emmerdale' where incest seems the rule rather than the exception!

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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Sep 03, 2018 5:42 pm

I wrote in commenting on his death that I thought that Robby Müller's best work was with Jim Jarmusch. Well, I've just seen Der Amerikanische Freund aka The American Friend (1977) and it's a fine adaptation of a Patricia Highsmith's story about sociopathic Tom Ripley & associates. Müller shoots it brilliantly to look like a Hopper painting (Edward), and Hopper plays Ripley coldly (Dennis). There's the added attraction of casting a bunch of directors as actors.... but is it ever more than a series of gimmicks?

I recall, oh, almost fifty years ago, when I was taking the Clarion writing course and one of the students talked about how you had to work at developing your style of writing. I always thought that was ridiculous. Did you also have to develop a style of walking, a style of breathing, a style of putting your shoes on in the morning? You tried various things, and some of them worked and you kept those. Some didn't and you abandoned those. What was left was your style. Think about how to do it a little better. Maybe it will work and you'll be successful, however you define success.

While I started this movie, I wondered if this was director Wim Wenders working on his style. Perhaps he thought it was a reflection of the story. After all, Tom Ripley is a manipulative, controlling character. Directors are manipulating, controlling characters. Was he trying to see if those character traits would show up on the screen? Or is it about nested levels of auteurism? A director directing directors as artists who create works of art over which they have absolute control... only they're forgeries, so they're all lying and it's all elephants all the way to the bottom.

Or perhaps I was just overthinking this because Wenders was tired of the critics and when a fellow director showed up, he gave him a role, then continued on as a goof. Maybe I should shut up, watch the movie, and see if I enjoyed it. There's a novel thought!

Bruno Ganz is living the virtuous life of an framer, since he's too ill to do restoration work. He's dying, actually. Ripley, whom he's annoyed, gets him set up doing killings, helping him liberally, happily and clumsily. There's lots of spilt brains and tortes for that wacky (no pun intended) German sense of humor. It's all Ripley's fault; it's some sort of low-level metaphor of American corruption, even if, for my money, Ganz corrupts pretty easily.

In short, it's a fine piece of translation of Highsmith to the screen, and kudos for that. If that's your idea of a good time, congratulations. It's not really mine.

But Müller's lighting is gorgeous.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Sep 16, 2018 5:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by MaryGH » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:03 pm

Ladies of Washington 1944

Sheila Ryan is Jerry Dailey, a vindictive woman who stops at nothing in order to get even with men after playing mistress to a married man of prestige in Washington, DC. She eventually hooks up with Anthony Quinn, and mistakes him for a man of wealth when he turns out to be a foreign spy. Robert Bailey is the young doctor who falls in love with Sheila but true to form, spurns him. Tight directing from Louis King, and the movie is well-paced for its 61 minute length. Uncredited appearance from Tom Tyler as an FBI agent.
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Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:09 pm

Karumen Kokyô Ni Kaeru aka Carmen Comes Home (1951): In a tiny mountain village where the children are taught to dance to a dirge-like town anthem, comes news that Hideko Takamine is coming home for a visit, since her theater is closed for a week, and bringing her friend, Toshiko Kobayashi. Her father, Takeshi Sakamoto, want to forbid it, even though she has sent home gifts and money since she ran away at 18; he can only imagine how corrupting Tokyo is. However, the school principal, Chishû Ryû, gives him a long lecture about art and culture, and he gives way. The girls are a little strange, showing too much leg, and it isn't until halfway through what seems to be Japan's first color movie that the village discovers the girls' art is the strip-tease.

It must have been a nice change of pace for one of Japan's leading actresses of feminist roles to play a ditzy stripper, but she appears to be having more fun in the part than this rather mild movie calls for. It's mostly about the characters in the small town; as I so often am, I am once again astounded at exactly the same sort of people cropping up in mountainous Japan as in small-town Indiana or Italy, with the same sort of story that might star Mitzi Gaynor or Diana Dors -- you choose your own Continental actress for the part. Keisuke Kinoshita directs facilely, if not deeply, Kiroshi Kusuda handles the color camera as well as he ever did the black & white model, and the mountain scenery is quite lovely. It's clearly a movie where they played it cannily, and the financial results seem to have been good enough to justify a sequel the next year. I'm sure that, having been a child actress on a movie lot at 5, Miss Takamine enjoyed showing a bitof adult skin .... and roaring at Miss Sakamoto like she was Toshiro Mifune.

Bob
Look into the pewter pot
To see the world as the world's not.

-- A.E. Housman

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