What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
User avatar
oldposterho
Posts: 581
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by oldposterho » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:58 pm

Always looking to add a Joseph H. Lewis film to the list so had a go at A Lady Without a Passport, something of a police procedural only using the Immigration Service as the cops. There are some wonderful tracking shots and Lewis flourishes and the film opens with a scene filmed from the inside of a car that harkens to the magnificent shot in Gun Crazy, but the film ultimately suffers from a by the numbers script.

It's good to see what Lewis could do with some decent MGM money, and the Havana sequences are neat to see the old city, pre-revolution. Hedy Lamarr is easy on the eyes though she doesn't have much to do and it's always a pleasure to watch one of my favorite '50s - '60s character actors George Macready oiling it up as the unscrupulous coyote, but it's probably only for the devoted.

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:13 pm

In Nyonin Aishû aka A Woman's Sorrows (1937) Takako Irie gives up her life as a shopgirl to marry into a wealthy family, and soon discovers that she is little more than a pretty servant. Her husband tries to find out what is wrong, but she is not sure herself; she is not even sure if she is happy or unhappy since she describes herself as a "conservative and indecisive woman.” She is, however, observant, and she sees her sister-in-law leave her ill-regarded husband because he does not measure up to her new family's standards.

It's a woman's movie on a theme that director Mikio Naruse would return to many times, but the lead actress brings a silent, stubborn watchfulness to the role that makes it very telling. Takako Irie would have a long and fruitful career in movies, extending from the 1920s for many decades. She may best be known for her roles in two of Kurosawa's pictures, The Most Beautiful and Sanjuro.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sat May 19, 2018 2:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
FrankFay
Posts: 3252
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:48 am
Location: Albany NY
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by FrankFay » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:43 pm

Richard P. May wrote: It's melodramatic, but a major picture of its day. I was told that it was director Vincent Sherman's favorite, and he was very pleased that the original version was preserved and made available.
One of my favorite moments - John Alexander's nearly audible face crack when he meets his now ravaged sweetheart
Eric Stott

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:57 pm

Joyû To Shijin aka The Actress and the Poet (1935) when actress Sachiko Chiba and her husband, poet Hiroshi Uruki, move into a gossipy street, they are a happy couple. True, she is the breadwinner of the household and his literary efforts pay almost nothing, but they don't care. However, when she asks him to help her learn her lines in a new play in which she plays the wife in a similar couple who has a fight, she confesses she doesn't understand the character.... but understanding is coming her way very soon.

Mikio Naruse is best remembered for directing tragedies of women's problems, but like any good director, he could turn his hand to comedy, and he understood that people taking themselves too seriously is the source of a lot of unnecessary sadness. This being an early sound film for him, he gets playful with the noises of voices and the street, in a way that later sound films abandoned.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sat May 19, 2018 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

R Michael Pyle
Posts: 1723
Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 1:10 pm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by R Michael Pyle » Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:24 am

I watched the new Blu-Ray restoration of the early two-strip Technicolor "King of Jazz" (1930). Simply a spectacular (if not unbelievably beautiful) restoration. I remember watching this on old VHS tapes with the miserably faded color and several missing parts. This many-year project was certainly worth the wait.

After having seen so many of the early VHS tapes of this, this was a revelation. The rubber legs dance of Al Norman was worth the entire show, but Roy Bargy's piano playing of "Rhapsody in Blue" is still my favorite part.

R Michael Pyle
Posts: 1723
Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 1:10 pm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by R Michael Pyle » Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:31 am

Daniel Eagan wrote:
R Michael Pyle wrote:
boblipton wrote: I'm rereading Jonathan Swift at the moment, and while I'm enjoying the intellectual complexity, I'm occasionally frustrated by the way his sentences ramble on... Bob
My opinion rarely counts for much, but I think his poetry is far better than his prose.
Sweepings from Butchers Stalls, Dung, Guts, and Blood,
Drown'd Puppies, stinking Sprats, all drench'd in Mud,
Dead Cats and Turnips-Tops come tumbling down the Flood.
Yes, doesn't that sound exactly like a Hogarth come-to-life? Goya would have loved it!


:lol:

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Fri Apr 27, 2018 12:07 pm

oldposterho wrote:Always looking to add a Joseph H. Lewis film to the list so had a go at A Lady Without a Passport, something of a police procedural only using the Immigration Service as the cops. There are some wonderful tracking shots and Lewis flourishes and the film opens with a scene filmed from the inside of a car that harkens to the magnificent shot in Gun Crazy, but the film ultimately suffers from a by the numbers script.

It's good to see what Lewis could do with some decent MGM money, and the Havana sequences are neat to see the old city, pre-revolution. Hedy Lamarr is easy on the eyes though she doesn't have much to do and it's always a pleasure to watch one of my favorite '50s - '60s character actors George Macready oiling it up as the unscrupulous coyote, but it's probably only for the devoted.
Is that the one where Macready admits that his chief weakness is his 'soft heart'?

User avatar
oldposterho
Posts: 581
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by oldposterho » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:15 pm

earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:Is that the one where Macready admits that his chief weakness is his 'soft heart'?
That's the one. He's a real peach.

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:54 pm

Because my cousin spent yesterday having doctors scrape away at skin cancer and he's going on a cruise for a couple of weeks, we took in Avengers: Infinity War (2018) this morning. Thanos is busy collecting Infinity Stones for his Gauntlet, starting out by killing Loki, and spends the bulk of the movie roving around the universe collecting most of them, while his minions try to get the two on this planet, thwarted by the various super-powered individuals (and the Black Widow), while the Guardians of the Galaxy hook up with Thor to thwart him from one and build the anti-Thanos weapon, preparatory to the final battle which (spoiler) takes place in Wakanda.

The three hour movie rambled hither and yon, with most characters getting enough screen time to be identifiable. Nonetheless, at the forty-five-minute mark, I whispered to my cousin "I've lost track of who's who" and he muttered back "Me too", despite having seen all the earlier movies. Chris Hemsworth as Thor gets the best jokes, there's one major continuity issue that annoyed me in the big final battle, and the visuals abandoned their adherence to comics I could identify -- understandably so, given the great range of sources they used. Still, it was a well-run matter, even if the MCU has gotten too large for a single movie to include everyone.

For those who look forward to the little scene that runs after the credit starts, you;'ll have time to duck out for a quick bathroom break (almost three hours, as I said), as it takes place at the end of the credits and leads into Captain Marvel, schedule for 2019 -- which is supposed to be set in the 1990s.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Apr 28, 2018 5:37 am

Considering the usually idiocy of aliens-invading-the-earth movies, I found Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) a refreshing example of the genre, if only for the visual design. I appreciated the way the cast and crew played this spoof straight within its farcical settings and managed a pleasant time for this viewer.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7520
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Sat Apr 28, 2018 6:54 am

Dr. Monica (1934) was butchered by the censors and seems to survive now in a 53-minute print with obvious plot holes.
Kay Francis stars as a doctor married to Warren William. He's had a fling with Jean Muir and she's having the baby that Francis can't have ... even an "operation" won't let her conceive. William is totally ignorant of the baby that Muir has "in the country" and which Francis delivers. When she learns who the baby's father is, everything goes to pot. Muir has the baby but can't have William; Francis has William but can't have a baby. Verree Teasdale plays the bitchy Eve Arden part, dropping advice and one-liners while pouring drinkies. There's a novel solution to the problem and Muir takes advantage of it. The original print ran a mere 65 minutes. It's too bad because the acting is very good, but the censors didn't seem to like the plot about an unwed mother, an illegitimate kid, adultery, and more.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat Apr 28, 2018 12:48 pm

oldposterho wrote:
earlytalkiebuffRob wrote:Is that the one where Macready admits that his chief weakness is his 'soft heart'?
That's the one. He's a real peach.
Must be about thirty years ago since I saw that one, but old George was a true scene-stealer!

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat Apr 28, 2018 1:00 pm

Watched a bundle of short movies, but no time to comment now. May add a bit later...

THE TENEMENT (1967) [TV - 'CBS Reports']
HOW DO YOU LIKE THE BOWERY? (1960)
THE BOWERY BISHOP* (TV, 1956) Spotted Robert Armstrong and Norma Varden in support
THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE (1938) Technicolor
LA CUCARACHA (1934) Technicolor, with a vivacious Steffi Duna and a food-loving Paul Porcasi
CROSS-ROADS (1955) British supernatural short, with Christopher Lee and a slimy Ferdy Mayne
THE LAST STRAND* (TV, 1957) Religious drama with Conrad Nagel as a priest who does a bit of detective work...

*from the series 'Crossroads', which dramatised episodes in the lives of priests, parsons and rabbis, and often tempted well-known stars to turn up before the cameras, much as the 'Christophers' series did around the same time.

Also watched the Technicolor snippets from the BFI - amazing stuff!
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:46 am

Accidentally wiped my write-up of this one - will redo later...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JHnfCnm4mc&t=170s" target="_blank" target="_blank

And does the section between 10.34 and 10.49 look familiar??

Also, is there any missing footage aside from the opening titles? One reviewer on IMDb wrote that TCM had cut the film to fit a time slot, but that strikes me as unlikely...
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Sun Apr 29, 2018 2:07 pm, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:29 am

Since most of the screens in Manhattan seem to be filled with Avengers this weekend, I caught up with multiply Nitratevillain-recommended The Death of Stalin. I have nothing to add to the chorus of admiration, except to note that Jeffrey Tambor is fast becoming an non-person. Good flick.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Sat May 19, 2018 2:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
2 Reel
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed May 17, 2017 10:34 am
Location: Earth, for the time being

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by 2 Reel » Sun Apr 29, 2018 4:17 pm

Thank You, Mr. Moto (1937) starring Peter Lorre and Pauline Frederick. Having never seen this, I approached it with the understanding that it was a low-budget programmer, but was I surprised! Not only does the production shine in every detail from sets to photography, but one scene in particular (the death of Prince Chung) was exquisitely lit, photographed, acted, directed and edited on par with the best of the best.

My first exposure to Pauline Frederick, legendary star, who turns in a memorable performance vocally and visually, in what is considered her last film role, appearing unrecognizable in heavy Asian makeup as Madam Chung, but she makes her scenes powerful, adding great nuance to every moment.

I am once again dumbfounded with disappointment over how the film industry has utterly failed to preserve its own work. Nearly all of Pauline's work is considered lost (see the list below), making a review of her work virtually impossible:

1915 The Eternal City Donna Roma Lost film
1915 Sold Helen Lost film
1915 Zaza ZaZa Lost film
1915 Bella Donna Bella Donna (Ruby Chepstow) Lost film
1915 Lydia Gilmore Lydia Gilmore Lost film
1916 The Spider Valerie St. Cyr/Joan Marche Lost film
1916 Audrey Audrey Lost film
1916 The Moment Before Madge A 35mm nitrate copy of the film is housed at the Cineteca Nazionale film archive in Rome.[24] The print is missing one sequence described as "the opening scene before the flashback."[25]
1916 The World's Great Snare Myra Lost film
1916 The Woman in the Case Margaret Rolfe
1916 Ashes of Embers Laura Ward/Agnes Ward Lost film
1916 Nanette of the Wilds Nanette Gauntier Lost film
1917 The Slave Market Ramona Lost film
1917 Sapho Sapho, aka Fanny Lagrand Lost film
1917 Sleeping Fires Zelma Bryce Lost film
1917 Her Better Self Vivian Tyler Lost film
1917 The Love That Lives Molly McGill
1917 Double Crossed Eleanor Stratton Lost film
1917 The Hungry Heart Courtney Vaughan Lost film
1918 Mrs. Dane's Defense Felicia Hindemarsh Lost film
1918 Madame Jealousy Madame Jealousy Lost film
1918 La Tosca Floria Tosca Lost film
1918 Resurrection Katusha Lost film
1918 Her Final Reckoning Marsa Lost film
1918 Fedora Princess Fedora Lost film
1918 Stake Uncle Sam to Play Your Hand Miss Liberty Loan Short film
1918 A Daughter of the Old South Dolores Jardine Lost film
1919 Out of the Shadow Ruth Minchin Lost film
1919 The Woman on the Index Sylvia Martin Lost film
1919 Paid in Full Emma Brooks Lost film....final Famous Players-Lasky/ Paramount feature
1919 One Week of Life Mrs. Sherwood & Marion Roche Lost film
1919 The Fear Woman Helen Winthrop Lost film
1919 The Peace of Roaring River Madge Nelson Lost film
1919 Bonds of Love Una Sayre Lost film
1919 The Loves of Letty Letty Shell
1920 The Paliser Case Cassy Cara Lost film
1920 The Woman in Room 13 Laura Bruce Lost film
1920 Madame X Jacqueline Floriot
1920 A Slave of Vanity Iris Bellamy Lost film ...First Robertson-Cole release
1921 The Mistress of Shenstone Lady Myra Ingleby extant; abridged or incomplete
1921 Roads of Destiny Dolly Jordan Lennon Lost film ...Final Goldwyn Pictures release
1921 Salvage Bernice Ridgeway/Kate Martin Lost film
1921 The Sting of the Lash Dorothy Keith Lost film
1921 The Lure of Jade Sara Vincent Lost film
1922 The Woman Breed
1922 Two Kinds of Women Judith Sanford Lost film
1922 The Glory of Clementina Clementina Wing Lost film
1924 Let Not Man Put Asunder Petrina Faneuil Lost film
1924 Married Flirts Nellie Wayne Lost film
1924 Three Women Mrs. Mabel Wilton
1925 Smouldering Fires Jane Vale
1926 Her Honor, the Governor Adele Fenway
1926 Devil's Island Jeannette Picto
1926 Josselyn's Wife Lillian Josselyn Lost film
1927 Mumsie Mumsie Lost film
1927 The Nest Mrs. Hamilton
1928 On Trial Joan Trask Lost film
1929 Evidence Myra Stanhope Lost film
1929 The Sacred Flame Mrs. Taylor - the Mother Lost film
They call me "Dangerous Dal"

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Apr 30, 2018 4:51 am

I could have sworn you were mistaken, that Miss Frederick's films were more generally available, but no.... I've only seen seven of them. Three available talkies in which she has good roles, which you don't mention are the '36 Ramona, This Modern Age and the overwrought but amusing Phantom of Crestwood.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7520
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Mon Apr 30, 2018 6:38 am

Storm Fear (1955) is an odd duck of a film with Cornel Wilde as star, director, and producer. It's mostly quite good (with some bad editing jumps) except for a few bursts of over-acting. Wilde plays a killer on the run with his sidekick (Steven Hill) and a moll (Lee Grant). They show up, on the verge of a snow storm, at his brother's remote mountain ranch. The brother (Dan Duryea) is an ailing and failing writer with a young wife (Jean Wallace) and a 12-year-old kid (David Stollery). There's also a "hired hand" (Dennis Weaver) lurking in the barn. During the storm, lots of secrets get spilled as tensions rise. The thugs make the kid lead them over a snowy mountain in an attempt to escape the cops they know are coming. The trek does not go well. Everyone is quite good except for Hill, who seems to be trying for a Rod Steiger-type explosive thing. This was a rare role for Grant in the midst of her Hollywood Blacklist period.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

User avatar
s.w.a.c.
Posts: 2024
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Mon Apr 30, 2018 7:05 am

Not sure why it took me so long, but finally watched John Sturges' post-OK Corral western Hour of the Gun (1967) with fine performances by James Garner and Jason Robards as Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, respectively. Robert Ryan makes for a formidable Ike Clanton as well. Also nice to see an old pal of mine, Canadian actor Austin Willis (Goldfinger, The Mouse That Roared) turn up for a scene as Arizona governor Anson Safford. Garner and Robards have great chemistry, and the former is more serious than usual, as befits the part.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

User avatar
greta de groat
Posts: 2122
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 1:06 am
Location: California
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by greta de groat » Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:12 am

boblipton wrote:I could have sworn you were mistaken, that Miss Frederick's films were more generally available, but no.... I've only seen seven of them. Three available talkies in which she has good roles, which you don't mention are the '36 Ramona, This Modern Age and the overwrought but amusing Phantom of Crestwood.

Bob

Not only that, but of her extant silents, only the great Smouldering Fires and the mediocre Devil's Island are on video. The others can only be seen at the archives or in a rare public screening, if at all. Of the ones i've seen, The Love that Lives and Three Women are excellent, Madame X is pretty good, and Her Honor the Governor is a solid programmer and a great role (plus Boris Karloff! Swedish titles, unfortunately). There is also a brief trailer for Josselyn's Wife. Note that her first 3 talkies are lost though i think some of the discs exist. Another fun talkie is The Social Register with Colleen Moore. And she has a very nasty character in Wayward with Nancy Carroll. She plays a lot of mean moms in talkies.

I've got reviews and comments on my Pauline Frederick site: https://web.stanford.edu/~gdegroat/PF/home.htm

greta
Greta de Groat
Unsung Divas of the Silent Screen
http://www.stanford.edu/~gdegroat

wingate
Posts: 264
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:06 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by wingate » Tue May 01, 2018 12:27 pm

Please Kill Me where Raymond Burr gets Angela Lansbury to kill him because she was guilty of murdering hier husband and he got her off the chargé.

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Tue May 01, 2018 2:32 pm

After giving up on THE FOUNTAIN (1935), ended up with a few shorts on the BFI site.

DEATH WAS A PASSENGER (1958) has Terence Alexander recognising a nun on a train as one he met whilst hiding from the Germans during the war. Intriguing at first, then very uneven.

CALL ME CAPTAIN (1961) is an attractively shot Norfolk travelogue, which is all but ruined by one of those shapeless music scores which seemed to blight non-fiction films of the period. Also hampering things is disc-jockey Pete Murray, giving a virtuoso display of pseudo-humorous verbal diarrhoea. A shame, because the material is pretty decent...

Victor Saville is credited as the director of ARMISTICE (1929), easily the best and most interesting of the three. A fairly straightforward (none of the later showers of petals) film featuring the Coldstream and Welsh Guards playing a medley of WWI popular tunes, martial fanfares, hymns, in addition to Henry Ainley (in uniform) reciting from 'In Flanders Fields'. Simply shot, and presented here in a beautiful copy, this is quite an effective, moving work. Hard to know what Victor Saville had to do here, although there is the odd camera pan, but a good companion to WOMAN TO WOMAN, and presumably KITTY (which I've not seen yet), both filmed / completed in the same year.
Last edited by earlytalkiebuffRob on Tue Jul 17, 2018 1:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
oldposterho
Posts: 581
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by oldposterho » Tue May 01, 2018 10:22 pm

Was finally able to see King of Jazz and I now get what the fuss is about. It is staggering just how good these old films can look when such obvious care is taken in the presentation. Although it's clear that the revue style musical was overplayed even by 1930 there are enough good toe-tappers to make some of the slogs pass by painlessly, and kudos to the dancers and whoever the choreographer was, first rate stuff. Whiteman doing the Rhapsody in Turquoise number and unexpected Walter Brennan are standouts.

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3324
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Wed May 02, 2018 1:56 am

REDEMPTION (1930) was actually made in 1929, but held back for release after John Gilbert's second talkie. Based on Tolstoy's 'The Living Corpse' it tells of a Russian officer whose weaknesses are drink, gambling and women, and who woos away best friend Conrad Nagel's fiancee Eleanor Boardman. Within a short while he is back to his old tricks, and (having become bankrupt) declares his intention to kill himself. Boardman and Nagel, now thinking themselves free to marry, do so, but without checking things out thoroughly enough.

This causes distress to Gilbert, with further complications arising when a fellow drinker suggests a spot of blackmail, which brings things to a head...

Handsomely produced, although still using title cards, I found REDEMPTION a good deal better than its reputation would suggest, and it's brief running time does not try the patience as one might be led to expect, although the film seems to have been truncated a little. Renee Adoree plays the gypsy girl he ends up living with, and is pretty effective here. More than just a historical footnote, in my view...

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Wed May 02, 2018 5:56 am

The Earthling (1980) In his next-to-last movie before he drank himself to death, William Holden is going back to a valley to die in Australia, When Ricky Schroeder's parents drive their camper over a cliff, the whiny kid attaches himself to Holden, who gradually calms him down and gets him in tune with his inner Zen. Good photography, good acting by Holden, lots of whining by Schroeder, which seems to be what was demanded of him in th movies.

Bob
Last edited by boblipton on Wed May 02, 2018 8:47 am, edited 2 times in total.
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
Jim Roots
Posts: 2856
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 2:45 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Wed May 02, 2018 8:42 am

Schroeder would finish in the top three of any and every vote for the most irritating child actor of all time. Even when he was being nice, there was just something about him that triggered hostility and sneers, at least among men and boys.

Jim

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7520
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Wed May 02, 2018 10:42 am

This has been discussed here before, but Thieves' Highway (1949) deserves another shout out. Terrific and gritty story about truckers fighting against a crooked buyer and rival truckers to get a load of apples to market in San Francisco. Richard Conte is the returning son who fights his father has been maimed and cheated by a big-city buyer (Lee J. Cobb). He teams up with Millard Mitchell to get an early load of apples to the city and make a bundle. Two other truckers (Jack Oakie, Joseph Pevney) get wind of their find and tail them across state, hoping to get a piece of the action. Cobb is as rotten as Conte suspected, especially after a local streetwalker (Valentina Cortese) picks him up to waylay him. Turns out she has a heart of gold, where Cobb has none. Tough look at a tough business with outstanding performances by all the main actors. Also very good are Hope Emerson and Morris Carnovsky. Only weaknesses are some jittery editing and Barbara Lawrence as the homwtown girl. Great film from Jules Dassin (blacklisted in 1952). Oakie was supposedly totally deaf at this point, but you'd never know it. Great print from Criterion Collection.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Thu May 03, 2018 5:21 am

At Gunpoint (1955) is a typical Allied Artist B+ western: top lead actors (Fred MacMurray, Dorothy Malone, Walter Brennan), good direction and camerawork, ambitious if overwrought score by Carmen Dragon and a spotty script by Daniel Ullman -- great situations and scenes, some awful dialogue.

When some bank robbers hit a small town, storekeeper Fred MacMurray picks up a gun and squeezes off a shot -- and by a miracle brings down a bad guy a half mile away. Hurray! But the dead man's brother wants his vengeance.... and keeps killing the wrong man, resulting in the town turning against its former hero.

Westerns are among the oldest of film genres, and along the way they accumulated so much baggage that they became symbolic fiction, like science fiction and fantasy (which have largely replaced them in the cinema). This movie has a strong political message, which it delivers, ultimately, overtly. This weakens it. A better western with political commentary, like High Noon, could leave its subtext in the subtext. Still, for fans of B westerns, it's a lot of fun to see some money spent on a favored form of fun.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6139
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Thu May 03, 2018 6:23 am

After the international success of Hercules, the Steve Reeves Swords-and-Sandals vehicle Il figlio di Spartacus aka The Slave (1962) clearly had some money spent on its production values -- good costumes and some nice sets to accent good camera lighting abound. The plot, typical of peplum movies, is a mishmosh of themes intended to take advantage of recent hits.

Reeves is a Roman centurion working for the noble Julius Caesar in Rome. He is captured by leopard-skin wearing desert barbarians working for the evil Crassus, escapes, gets captured again, is enslaved, identified as Spartacus' son (hence the movie's Italian title) and leads a slave rebellion.

Director Sergio Corbucci does his usual highly competent job, abetted by the handsome production values that Cinecitta was capable of; kudos especially to director of Photography Enzo Baroni, whose lighting suggests illustrations on parchment. Although the writing never rises above the level of silliness that such cheap epics aspired to, fans of the genre will find plenty to enjoy.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7520
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Thu May 03, 2018 7:13 am

Man on a Swing (1974) is a creepy story, based on a real-life murder and the book, "The Girl on the Volkswagen Floor," that pits a small-town sheriff (Cliff Robertson) against a possibly fake clairvoyant (Joel Grey) who has lots of inside information about the murder of a young woman. While the sheriff is pressured to solve the murder, he's plagued by the clairvoyant who might actually be the killer. The real-life case apparently remains unsolved. Grey is especially good as the psychic who goes in and out of swoons and trances and voices yet otherwise seems to be a model citizen with a job and family. A puzzle whose pieces do not fit. Elizabeth Wilson is also good as the psychiatrist. Cast includes Dorothy Tristan, Peter Masterson, Josef Sommer, George Voskovec, Alice Drummond, Ron Weyand, and Lane Smith.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

Post Reply