My Own Personal British Film Festival: Love Story

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
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Frederica
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My Own Personal British Film Festival: Love Story

Unread post by Frederica » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:06 pm

Last night I watched Love Story, a 1944 Gainsborough film directed by Leslie Arliss, starring Margaret Lockwood, Stewart Granger, and Patricia Roc.

Healthy-looking classical pianist Margaret Lockwood discovers she’s going to die, so she sets out for the Cornish coast to experience life. While there, she meets former RAF pilot turned mineralogist Stewart Granger, who is searching for molybdenum while going blind. Molybdenum is one of my all-time favorite words and it doesn’t come up in daily conversation that often, so imagine how startled I was to hear it in a Gainsborough film. Molybdenum, molybdenum, molybdenum.

Granger and Lockwood are immediately attracted to each other, but it’s a movie so they both have to lie to each other about the dying and the blind. Lying is a solid basis for movie love affairs, look how well it works in One Way Passage. Noble behavior, sacrifice, and (this being Cornwall) a mine disaster ensue, not to mention violins, violins, violins.

Love Story is a sappy, silly, over-the-top, harebrained three-hanky tearjerker; I suspect it was critically trashed at release, but I’ll also bet it did boffo B.O. I can see why. While fully aware of the sappy, the silly, and the harebrained, I enjoyed every single overwrought minute of it. The only way it could have been better is if I’d had Ben & Jerry’s handy. I won’t make that mistake again.

A head-bonk from the bejeweled feline and a soggy wave of the tear-stained lace handkerchief for Love Story.

Fred
Last edited by Frederica on Wed Sep 16, 2009 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Fred
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rudyfan
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Unread post by rudyfan » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:37 pm

I'm sure this is wonderful, really!

But, BUT, BUT, I know I'd miss Kay Fwancis, William Powell, Frank McHugh and Aline McMahon. Not to mention the clink of some glasses.....

I've added it to my wish list!
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Derek B.
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Re: My Own Personal British Film Festival: Love Story

Unread post by Derek B. » Wed Sep 16, 2009 2:48 pm

Frederica wrote:Love Story is a sappy, silly, over-the-top, harebrained three-hanky tearjerker; I suspect it was critically trashed at release, but I’ll also bet it did boffo B.O. I can see why. While fully aware of the sappy, the silly, and the harebrained, I enjoyed every single overwrought minute of it. The only way it could have been better is if I’d had Ben & Jerry’s handy. I won’t make that mistake again.
Fred
According to Everson it did "big boxoffice". As I wrote previously, it isn't for everyone but it works well for me too. And it's worth adding a nod for Tom Walls. Incidentally, it is in two R2 DVD sets, The Stewart Granger Collection [12 DVDs] and The Margaret Lockwood Collection [6 DVDs], both of which provide good value for money if you find them at reasonable prices.
- Derek B.

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Penfold
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Unread post by Penfold » Thu Sep 17, 2009 4:43 am

Re. British wartime box office.......the films you might think were the blockbusters generally weren't, the films we now see as classics generally did all right or their makers would have sunk without trace; but those at the top of the heap were those frilly frou-frou nonsense period films that, generally speaking, the women of wartime Britain went to for a bit of escape from their reality.....most of the men being elsewhere or otherwise engaged. The inflation-adjusted box office charts are dominated by Gainsborough and Anna Neagle/Herbert Wilcox films....Hence the most successful British film of all time at the box office remains The Courtneys of Curzon Street, IIRC
I could use some digital restoration myself...

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boblipton
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Unread post by boblipton » Thu Sep 17, 2009 5:23 am

Freddy wrote:
Noble behavior, sacrifice, and (this being Cornwall) a mine disaster ensue, not to mention violins, violins, violins.
No musical pirates?

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

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