Is This A Tell-Tale Sign of a Pre-code Film?

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Marr&Colton
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Is This A Tell-Tale Sign of a Pre-code Film?

Unread post by Marr&Colton » Thu Nov 05, 2009 3:26 pm

Been studying and appreciating pre-code films very much in the last few years.

It just dawned on me that prior to late 1934 or so, in the opening credits there was no statement next to the MPDA mark "Certificate Number xxx"

It did appear thereafter for decades....is it safe to assume an early 1934 release without the certificate number was released before the production code required "certificates"?

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BrianG
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Unread post by BrianG » Thu Nov 05, 2009 6:00 pm

According to the book "Sin In Soft Focus: Pre-Code Hollywood" Certificate Of Approval No. 1 was awarded on July 11, 1934 to John Ford's The World Moves On. I imagine there was a backlog of completed films waiting to be pushed through in July, so I don't know if all the films approved in the first few months showed the certificate #'s in the credits. If I remember right, there were also a few films with questionable content that slipped through the cracks in the first few month and got released.

Marr&Colton
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Unread post by Marr&Colton » Fri Nov 06, 2009 7:00 am

That's what I suspected. Actually I did read SIN IN SOFT FOCUS but must have missed the part about the certificates.

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Harlett O'Dowd
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Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Fri Nov 06, 2009 7:46 am

BrianG wrote:According to the book "Sin In Soft Focus: Pre-Code Hollywood" Certificate Of Approval No. 1 was awarded on July 11, 1934 to John Ford's The World Moves On. I imagine there was a backlog of completed films waiting to be pushed through in July, so I don't know if all the films approved in the first few months showed the certificate #'s in the credits. If I remember right, there were also a few films with questionable content that slipped through the cracks in the first few month and got released.
And Breen and the Code became stronger over time before filmmakers started chipping away at it in the mid-1950s.

The differences between the miscegenation scenes in the 1936 and 1951 versions of Show Boat being a prime example of Breen's ascendance.

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