Who are you? (Formal introductions)

Comments related to the operation of NitrateVille.
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Mike Gebert
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Unread post by Mike Gebert » Fri Jul 25, 2008 7:19 pm

"Now as an impressionable 37 year old, I am planning to attend the Fall Cinevent"

Cinevent was in May. Do you mean Cinecon (Los Angeles) or Cinesation (Ohio)? Either way, I admire the dedication of someone who comes to the US and chooses either of those, so be sure to meet up with some NitrateVillains!
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

warpedtime
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Unread post by warpedtime » Fri Jul 25, 2008 7:49 pm

Mike Gebert wrote: Do you mean Cinecon (Los Angeles) or Cinesation (Ohio)?
Aggh, I meant Cinesation, Ohio!
I hope that's what I meant... I've booked the hotel room now!

Thank you for your welcome. It would be wonderful to meet some NitrateVillains in person. I've been reading your posts for years, all the time wishing that you would announce a screening within a 1000 km radius of where I live!

kindest regards
Alan Thompson
(warpedtime)

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Mike Gebert
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Unread post by Mike Gebert » Fri Jul 25, 2008 8:07 pm

See you there, Alan!
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

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Danny Burk
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Unread post by Danny Burk » Fri Jul 25, 2008 9:43 pm

Hello Alan, and welcome to the group!

I'll be at Cinesation too, and will look forward to seeing you there. I have quite a few friends in Australia and it will be nice to finally have the chance to meet one of them in person :)

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s.w.a.c.
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Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Mon Jul 28, 2008 4:12 pm

Hi folks, Stephen Cooke here, from up in the wilds of Nova Scotia. I've been in limbo between a.m.s. and here for a while now, and sadly didn't get to Cinefest in Syracuse this year, so I'm even futher out of the loop.

But I look forward to reconnection with some familiar names and faces and can't wait to get back to discussing Sh! The Octopus and the influence of Fred Ott's Sneeze on film noir.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

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s.w.a.c.
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Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:02 am

Hi guys, Stephen Cooke from Halifax here. I've been in limbo between a.m.s. and NitrateVille for a long time now (and missing Cinefest in Syracuse this year didn't help), but I look forward to hanging out here reacquainting myself with familiar faces as well as new ones.

s.w.a.c.
So...any lost Snitz Edwards films surface recently?
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

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silentfilm
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Unread post by silentfilm » Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:27 am

Stephen,
It's great to have you here. This place could use a few more laughs.
And I never knew that you looked just like David Bowie!

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Jim Roots
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Stephen Is Back!

Unread post by Jim Roots » Wed Jul 30, 2008 7:45 am

Can we have a separate topic dedicated to the pun fights between Stephen and Mike S.?

You've been gone too long, Stephen. This raises the Canadian quotient to, uh, 4 people, I think. Which means this place is 40% more civilized.


Jim

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Mike Gebert
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Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Jul 30, 2008 8:21 am

And 40% more likely that someone will get obscure references to "Seeing Things" or "The Hart & Lorne Terrific Hour."
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

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Jim Roots
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Unread post by Jim Roots » Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:36 am

Mike Gebert wrote:And 40% more likely that someone will get obscure references to "Seeing Things" or "The Hart & Lorne Terrific Hour."
"The Trouble with Tracy".

"Juliette".

"Quentin Durgens, MP"

We're more than "Hockey Night In Canada", folks!

(Anybody else remember Robert Goulet's exuberant belting-out of the Molson's song in a long-running commercial?)

Oh ... and "Pig and Whistle"...

Jim

Helen
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hello!

Unread post by Helen » Sat Aug 02, 2008 11:44 pm

Hello. My name is Helen (real name - I can never think of a catchy nom de plume, so I always end up signing with the real one :) ). At time of writing I'm living in Los Angeles for a year, but in three months will be moving back to my hometown of Indianapolis, where I've always lived excepting those bygone years of higher education and my current long vacation. Lawyer by profession, movie lover and amateur film critic by avocation.

I became interested in movies in my early 'teens. My parents being fine people who didn't require me to get a summer job until I went off to college, I spent the summers of my teenage years watching old movies instead of contributing to the family's livelihood. Those were the years when AMC was still American Movie Classics, with its programming supplemented by the extremely random classics collection at the local video store. I started watching silent movies because I wanted to be better informed about film history to provide context for my then greatest love, American studio films of the '30s. My film interests have expanded ove the years to include practically everything, but silents have remained a constant preoccupation. My top areas of interest today (and this has remained steady for several years now, so the era of fluctuation and experimentation may have ended with my '20s) are contemporary American films, Hong Kong films, Japanese films especially samurai cinema, and silent films especially American silents from the mid-'teens through the end of the era.

One of the benefits of living in Indianapolis (just about the only benefit as a silent movie lover!) is its relative proximity to Cinevent and Cinesation and I have attended those festivals almost every year for the last decade. This year I plan to take advantage of my LA sojourn to attend Cinecon for the first time.

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Harlett O'Dowd
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Re: hello!

Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:03 am

Helen wrote:Hello. My name is Helen (real name - I can never think of a catchy nom de plume, so I always end up signing with the real one :) ). At time of writing I'm living in Los Angeles for a year, but in three months will be moving back to my hometown of Indianapolis, where I've always lived excepting those bygone years of higher education and my current long vacation. Lawyer by profession, movie lover and amateur film critic by avocation.

I became interested in movies in my early 'teens. My parents being fine people who didn't require me to get a summer job until I went off to college, I spent the summers of my teenage years watching old movies instead of contributing to the family's livelihood. Those were the years when AMC was still American Movie Classics, with its programming supplemented by the extremely random classics collection at the local video store. I started watching silent movies because I wanted to be better informed about film history to provide context for my then greatest love, American studio films of the '30s. My film interests have expanded ove the years to include practically everything, but silents have remained a constant preoccupation. My top areas of interest today (and this has remained steady for several years now, so the era of fluctuation and experimentation may have ended with my '20s) are contemporary American films, Hong Kong films, Japanese films especially samurai cinema, and silent films especially American silents from the mid-'teens through the end of the era.

One of the benefits of living in Indianapolis (just about the only benefit as a silent movie lover!) is its relative proximity to Cinevent and Cinesation and I have attended those festivals almost every year for the last decade. This year I plan to take advantage of my LA sojourn to attend Cinecon for the first time.
Welcome. Say howdy at Cinecon (I'll be the one in the Golden Dawn T-shirt)

How wonderful you signed up for nitrateville on the birthday of the other Helen (Morgan, that is)

Dustin
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Unread post by Dustin » Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:46 am

I am W. Dustin Alligood. I'm 25 and from Farmington, Maine. Theatrical silent screenings are few and far between since the end of the Northeast Silent Film Festival. You can count on one or two a year at UMF (university in town, which I graduated from with a degree in computer science), at the Strand in Rockland, and one on Halloween at the Merrill in Portland (apart from silent film, my other great love is opera, and being Maine's only functioning opera house, the Merrill sees me a lot). Beyond that, you do get the occasional screening elsewhere, but none you can count on.

I couldn't tell you what the first silent film I saw was, but certainly the first one I can clearly remember is Spite Marriage--a tatty VHS copy, which describes most silent films I saw until TCM. You might think that suggests my parents are silent film enthusiasts, but the truth is far from it. My father I'm quite sure has never seen one in his life, and my mother, after years of my coaxing, has only reluctantly begun to appreciate Greta Garbo pictures. But I loved them, and I tended to get whatever I wanted. Some describe that as being spoiled, I call it being an only child.

Film, the physical medium I mean, I've always found fascinating. There's something special about it that makes even the worst quality 8mm print with nothing more than a generic classical record providing accompaniment a bit more exciting than the finest DVD video and sound. My first 8mm camera and projector came from the annual Lion's club flea market, around 1996 or '97. Inquiring where to get film, I wrote to Michael Nyberg, who had around that time been mentioned in PC Magazine for his Super 8mm website, and he directed me to John Schwind. I probably shot a mile of K25. Lovely stuff. A thousand years from now when future generations write about the fall of Western Civilization, surely they'll pinpoint the exact downturn as being when Kodak discontinued K25. K40 just wasn't the same, and 64T's not even similar.

Anyway, back to the main plot, I think at that time I was only vaguely aware that pre-made films were once available on 8mm (you must remember, this was all obsolete long before I ever became interested in it, so it's not as though I would ever have had occasion to see one). Antiquing one day, I found a can of film with "Chaplin" scratched onto the lid. It turned out to be Mabel's Married Life. I was absolutely enthralled. You must imagine, then, what my response was when I found eBay.

Well, fast-forward. I've got hundreds of DVDs and VHS tapes, many times more than that recorded off the TV or acquired from darker-than-white markets, and a "film vault" (a storeroom in a cold basement with a dehumidifier, just next door to the screening room) overflowing with 8mm, Super 8mm, 9.5mm, 16mm, and 35mm films. Sometime a couple years ago I thought to myself "why don't I go into business a la Grapevine?" I have a number of their tapes and DVDs and they surely don't set the bar very high--I may not be able to match their catalogue, but I can surely do better quality wise. So I built a film transfer machine, wrote a computer driver for it, wrote all manner of restoration software, and went to work. I also built a reverse telecine machine so I could output the finished product back to film and release it not just on DVD, but Super 8mm also. I've only released one film and am working now on my second (slow going, since I do everything myself), but it's great fun.

And that's my story. A bit long, I apologize. I don't talk much, but when I do, I tend to ramble.

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Unread post by silentfilm » Sun Aug 17, 2008 6:01 am

Dustin,
Glad you joined us. Just in case you already didn't know about this...

http://www.nitrateville.com/viewtopic.php?t=1716

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Rollo
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Unread post by Rollo » Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:17 pm

Hello all. I just discovered NitrateVille. For a couple of weeks I've been reading the latest posts and marveling at the depth of knowledge on display here. It's a reservoir in which, I'm afraid, I'll be treading water much of the time.

I have loved movies since I was old enough to fib to my parents about where I was going on Saturday afternoons. Actually, they objected to only about 50% of the films I wanted to see; I managed to take in half of those on the sly and panted for years after the ones that eluded me. (My mother always responded to my entreaties with the same question: "Does it have a gorilla in it?" This was the fifties. Didn't she know about radioactive tarantulas?)

Silents fascinated me well before I saw Robert Youngson's compilations, but I have no idea how I became aware of them. (Seeing them butchered on "Fractured Flickers," I remember, made me acutely uncomfortable.) My first stop when visiting Disneyland was always the silent movie theater on Main Street, where The Great Train Robbery and assorted clips ran continuously. The late fifties/early sixties brought Classics of the Silent Screen, Silents Please, and the Warren publications Famous Monsters of Filmland, Spacemen, and Screen Thrills Illustrated--all, for me, forays into uncharted waters. These were the days when pizza parlors routinely ran loops of Keystone Cops footage while employees pranced around in striped shirts and straw boaters. In college I finally got to see uncut prints of Cops and The Rink and Big Business, not as part of the regular film series but on a makeshift screen in the deserted cafeteria on sleepy Friday afternoons. When the old Fox Theater in downtown San Diego scheduled a midnight showing of The Phantom of the Opera, with live organ accompaniment, I was a nervous wreck for a week. I felt as if I'd stumbled over a discarded tool on the rim of Olduvai Gorge.

I've attended the San Francisco Silent Film Festival for the past two years. Now, I think, I've seen silent film.

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Unread post by silentfilm » Sat Aug 23, 2008 8:37 am

Rollo,
Welcome to the group. I don't know if you are aware of it, but there is a regular silent film series just up the highway from you in Salem, Oregon...

http://www.elsinoretheatre.com/events/f ... ptember_17

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Rollo
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Unread post by Rollo » Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:31 pm

Thanks, Bruce. Yes, I attended their Wednesday evening film series last spring--all silents and pre-codes, including Spies, Speedy, and Design for Living. The fall silents will kick off with The General, I understand. The 1926 Elsinore was slated to become a parking lot until Salem residents went to bat for its restoration, which was completed in 2004. It's an incredibly beautiful theater, perhaps the last of the grand Tudor Gothics. Music is provided by the talented Rick Parks, who accompanies the silents with seismic enthusiasm on the Wurlitzer.

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Murnau
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Unread post by Murnau » Mon Sep 01, 2008 8:05 am

Hello everyone. My name is Kari Glödstaf and I am from Finland. I’m 34 years old and married. My wife is almost as big silent movie fan as I am.

My first movie memory is Walt Disney’s The Rescuers when I was about four years old. Next favourite movies were Howard Hawks’ Rio Bravo and Ivan Reitman’s Ghostbusters (I saw it about fifteen times in the movies). As a teenager I collected all kind of horror films etc.

I have been a silent movie fan and a collector about ten years now. Nosferatu was the first silent movie I ever saw and it is still one of my favourites. Other films I like nowadays are the obvious: The Kid, Sunrise, Greed, La passion de Jeanne d’Arc, Der Letzte Mann etc. My favourite directors are Chaplin, Stroheim, Murnau, Sjöström, Dreyer and Griffith.

I envy you Americans, because you have so many places to see silent movies and so many silent films available. In Finland we have only one Silent Movie Festival (Forssa Silent Movie) and Finnish Film Archive shows about 20 silents per year (230 km from my hometown). All Finnish silent films between 1907-1919 are lost and only about 30 have survived in some kind of shape. It is also disappointing that only one Finnish silent movie is available on dvd (Häiden vietto Karjalan runomailla / Wedding in Poetic Karjala, 1921).

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FrankFay
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Unread post by FrankFay » Mon Sep 01, 2008 8:51 am

Greetings- Eric Stott here, I'm 51 and live in Albany NY. Occupation: minor curatorial staff member at the New York State Military Museum in Saratoga Springs NY. Hobbies: too varied to be comfortable. Aside from films I also go to vintage dances (www.vintagedancers.org) and I play the saxophone badly. If you want a GREAT saxophonist who plays like he's stepped out of the early 20th C. check out Dan Levinson (www.danlevinson.com) he plays with Vince Giordano's Nighthawks.
Otherwise, I'm a Mason (and enjoy it very much) and the slave and servant to my cat Harry.
Eric Stott

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silentfilm
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Unread post by silentfilm » Mon Sep 01, 2008 10:55 am

Kari, I'm glad you found you way here. Were you able to go to the Forssa festival this last weekend? How big are the crowds?

Although there are many festivals around the USA, there are still man of us that have to travel quite a distance to get to one -- if we can afford it.

Are there many books on Finnish silent films? Any in English?

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Murnau
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Unread post by Murnau » Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:20 am

I was at the Forssa Festival, it was my 7th time there – I have missed only two first festivals. This year was more successful than last year, when movies were from France (Feyder, Gance, Renoir etc.). Crowds were quite good, about 80 people per show (theater’s capacity is about 110-120). Harold Lloyd’s Girl Shy was sold-out, maybe because movie historian Peter von Bagh lectured. Overall the Festival was excellent.

Any books about Finnish silent films? Just one (published 1972) but we have a couple of “Movie History” books which discuss silent era. None of them are in English, unfortunately.

JonChaneyFan
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Unread post by JonChaneyFan » Sat Sep 13, 2008 3:49 pm

Hi all. Many of you probably know me, but just in case, I'm Jon Mirsalis. Probably best known as a silent film accompanist for over 30 years now (first playing job was January of 1976). I'm a regular pianist at the Niles Film Museum in Niles, CA and have performed at many venues throughout the U.S. including the George Eastman House Dreyden Theater, the Library of Congress Mary Pickford Theater, the Castro Theater in San Francisco, the San Francisco Film Festival, The Mill Valley Film Festival, the San Francisco Silent Film Festival, Cinecon, and Cinefest. I've recorded scores for many video releases for Kino International, Milestone Films, LSVideo, Flicker Alley, Turner Classic Movies, and other distributors. Some of his released scores include OTHELLO, THE MARK OF ZORRO, DON Q SON OF ZORRO, A LITTLE PRINCESS, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, WOMAN IN THE MOON, THE MAN FROM BEYOND, VICTORY, LADY OF THE NIGHT, and many short subjects. I recently did the score for ANNA MAY WONG: FROSTED YELLOW WILLOWS (2007), a documentary about Chinese actress Anna May Wong.

I am also an avid Lon Chaney fan and run a Chaney web site that just recently moved to a new domain at www.lonchaney.org. You can read a whole bunch more about me on that site. I also maintain a rather extensive database of archival silent film holdings that is good enough that a number of archives regularly contact me to see what is in their own collections!

I have a fairly sizable 16mm film collection and provide films regularly to Cinefest, Cinevent, Niles Film Museum, and a bunch of other venues. Major collecting areas include Chaney, Ronald Colman, Fairbanks, Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd, Wm S. Hart, King Vidor, D.W. Griffith, Frank Borzage, Laurel & Hardy, Clara Bow, German silents, and silent films in general.

Oh yeah, and I have Ph.D. degrees in toxicology and genetics, and am the Managing Director of the Biosciences Division at SRI International in Menlo Park, CA.

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Danny Burk
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Unread post by Danny Burk » Sat Sep 13, 2008 4:15 pm

Glad to see you here, Jon!

Musidora
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Introductions

Unread post by Musidora » Sat Sep 13, 2008 4:43 pm

Hi Everyone!
My name is Laura and I live with my husband Dan in New Jersey. I have been an avid silent film lover all my life, from the age of 9, when I discovered Douglas Fairbanks Sr quite by accident: my teacher gave us an assignment to write a report on "Douglas Fairbanks" when she meant "Frederick Douglass"! I dutifully went to the library to find out who he was, and picked up Joe Franklin's book, "50 Classics of the Silent Screen." From this I discovered, among others, D.W. Griffith, the Gish sisters, Mary Pickford, and Chaplin. That was it--I was completely obsessed with seeing every film featured in the book! My Dad then rented 8 mm copies of "Intolerance" and the original "Phantom of the Opera" for my next birthday party to help get me started.

I'm a teacher myself now, and but my main passion is researching and writing about this wonderful era--I love the thrill of uncovering an untold or forgotten story. I have just completed a book about Karl Dane that will be published by McFarland.

I have met a number of you already through other forums, and look forward to sharing ideas with all of you in the weeks to come!
Best,
Laura

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Harlett O'Dowd
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Re: Introductions

Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Sat Sep 13, 2008 11:23 pm

Musidora wrote:Hi Everyone!
My name is Laura and I live with my husband Dan in New Jersey. I have been an avid silent film lover all my life, from the age of 9, when I discovered Douglas Fairbanks Sr quite by accident: my teacher gave us an assignment to write a report on "Douglas Fairbanks" when she meant "Frederick Douglass"! I dutifully went to the library to find out who he was, and picked up Joe Franklin's book, "50 Classics of the Silent Screen." From this I discovered, among others, D.W. Griffith, the Gish sisters, Mary Pickford, and Chaplin. That was it--I was completely obsessed with seeing every film featured in the book! My Dad then rented 8 mm copies of "Intolerance" and the original "Phantom of the Opera" for my next birthday party to help get me started.

I'm a teacher myself now, and but my main passion is researching and writing about this wonderful era--I love the thrill of uncovering an untold or forgotten story. I have just completed a book about Karl Dane that will be published by McFarland.

I have met a number of you already through other forums, and look forward to sharing ideas with all of you in the weeks to come!
Best,
Laura
welcome. Where from Jersey do you hail? There are a disproportionate number of nitratevillains from Jersey - past and present (I grew up in National Park myself.)

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Jim Roots
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Unread post by Jim Roots » Mon Sep 15, 2008 7:09 am

JonChaneyFan wrote:Hi all. Many of you probably know me, but just in case, I'm Jon Mirsalis.
Finally Jon surfaces here! Now we can all enjoy being told, "This is a lost film" !!

About time you sauntered along, Jon!


Jim

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Frederica
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Unread post by Frederica » Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:01 pm

Jim Roots wrote:
JonChaneyFan wrote:Hi all. Many of you probably know me, but just in case, I'm Jon Mirsalis.
Finally Jon surfaces here! Now we can all enjoy being told, "This is a lost film" !!

About time you sauntered along, Jon!


Jim
I wonder if we could get a sepulchral bell toll sound every time he says that? Is there such a thing as a Soundicon?

Fred

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rudyfan
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Unread post by rudyfan » Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:19 pm

Frederica wrote:
I wonder if we could get a sepulchral bell toll sound every time he says that? Is there such a thing as a Soundicon?

Fred
http://www.grsites.com/archive/sounds/category/14/

For whom some bells toll
http://www.rudolph-valentino.com" target="_blank" target="_blank
http://nitanaldi.com" target="_blank" target="_blank
http://www.dorothy-gish.com" target="_blank" target="_blank

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milefilms
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Unread post by milefilms » Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:44 pm

rudyfan wrote:
Frederica wrote:
I wonder if we could get a sepulchral bell toll sound every time he says that? Is there such a thing as a Soundicon?

Fred
http://www.grsites.com/archive/sounds/category/14/

For whom some bells toll
I'm personally thinking Law and Order.
Dennis Doros
Milestone F&V

Musidora
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Unread post by Musidora » Mon Sep 15, 2008 8:37 pm

Thanks so much for the welcome, and wow, you're right, I didn't realize there were a good number of Jerseans here on the board! I live in Madison, in Morris County, but I was born in Newark.

I have never been to National Park-this is the first I've heard of it, I am ashamed to say.
Best,
Laura

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