Can anyone identify this still?

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silentfilm
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Can anyone identify this still?

Unread post by silentfilm » Tue Dec 18, 2007 9:21 pm

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This very interesting still is numbered "202". If it was an MGM production, that would be Daddy's Gone A-Hunting, but this scene does not seem to match the plot of that film. I don't recognoze the lady in the center, but the costumes make me suspect that this film is from the late 1920s or early 1930s.
Last edited by silentfilm on Tue Jan 08, 2008 12:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Jack Theakston
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Unread post by Jack Theakston » Tue Dec 18, 2007 9:39 pm

Bruce, can you please post a detail of the woman's... ahem.. face?
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Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Dec 19, 2007 12:29 pm

Image

Here's an actual size close-up of the actress' face.

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Harold Aherne
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Unread post by Harold Aherne » Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:24 pm

This is probably wrong, but MGM's "Pretty Ladies" (1925) had a number of musical sequences--what they looked like I don't know.

-Harold

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Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Dec 19, 2007 7:41 pm

The still code for MGM's Pretty Ladies (1925) is 227. Without an identification of one of the actors, I can't be sure that it is even an MGM film. At 202, it could be a Paramount film from the late 1910s (pretty unlikely), or a First National Film from 1929 or so. It is definitely not from Universal, Fox, or United Artists, as they used different still code identifiers. It almost looks like a scene from an imitation Cecil B. DeMille opus.

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Unread post by rudyfan » Wed Dec 19, 2007 7:51 pm

Funny, the bathtub looks like the one used in Ingram's Four Horsemen (antiques collected by the Josef Swickcard character), if so, MGM/Metro never tossed anything, did they?
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Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Dec 19, 2007 8:25 pm

Here's the Daddy's Gone A-Hunting (1925) story synopsis by Janiss Garza at the All-Movie Guide:

Julian (Percy Marmont) is an artist with a restless soul. When he runs into Edith, his childhood sweetheart (Alice Joyce), he becomes inspired and marries her. After several years he feels himself growing bored. Inspiration is just about nonexistent, in spite of the presence of Janet, the couple's lively daughter (Virginia Marshall). Edith agrees to get a job while Julian goes to Paris for a year. When he returns from the bohemian life he had overseas, he decides he no longer loves Edith. Nevertheless, the couple moves to an artists' colony. Edith is miserable, but attention from the kindly Greenough (Holmes E. Herbert) keeps her from dissolving into despair. Julian's attitude towards her remains unchanged, so she finally leaves him. When he fully feels the effects of this loss, he paints a masterpiece, then goes to find Edith, who is about to accept Greenough's marriage proposal. Although Janet has died, the couple is reunited.

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Unread post by Jack Theakston » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:37 am

Perhaps the scene is an interlude in the film that takes place in Paris?
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Unread post by 35MM » Wed Jan 02, 2008 7:34 pm

Harold Aherne wrote:This is probably wrong, but MGM's "Pretty Ladies" (1925) had a number of musical sequences--what they looked like I don't know.

-Harold
"Sisk" in Variety (1925):

An expensive film devoted primarily to plugging the Follies, for it mentions that show by name several times....The fault with the film is that either [director] Bell or the producers have tried to mix a spectacle of New York's theatrical world with an absorbing human interest story. Most of the revue scenes are shown in color. Living chandeliers and undressed ladies, usual revue adjuncts, are to be seen.

From:
http://www.joancrawfordbest.com/filmspretty.htm

The color sequences have since been lost.

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Unread post by silentfilm » Thu Jan 03, 2008 9:11 am

Here's the Pretty Ladies (1925) story synopsis by Janiss Garza at the All-Movie Guide:

This comedy-drama about the Follies was written by veteran newspaper reporter and "sob sister" Adela Rogers St. John. Maggie (ZaSu Pitts) is the Follies comedienne, and she envies all the other girls in the show — the pretty ladies with their sweethearts. She knows she's only there for the laughs, and that no one would ever give her a second look if not for her clowning. Things change when the accidentally falls into the orchestra and breaks the drums being played by Al Cassidy (Tom Moore). A friendship begins which blooms into romance, sparking the jealousy of Selma, the leading lady (Lilyan Tashman). Cassidy writes a hit for Maggie and sticks by her. Eventually they marry and start a family. Cassidy, who has become a renowned songwriter, is called to Atlantic City to prepare a new score for Selma. Finally he falls prey to her charms. A gossip informs Maggie of this fact, but when he returns home contrite she refuses to listen to him and pretends nothing has happened. Secretly, she prays it will never happen again. The supporting cast in this picture is impressive. It includes Norma Shearer, Conrad Nagel, and Ann Pennington as herself. In a bit part is an ambitious, up-and-coming young starlet by the name of Lucille LeSueur. It would be a mere matter of months before she became more well known as Joan Crawford.

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Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Tue Jan 08, 2008 11:00 am

rudyfan wrote:Funny, the bathtub looks like the one used in Ingram's Four Horsemen (antiques collected by the Josef Swickcard character), if so, MGM/Metro never tossed anything, did they?
They sure didn't. Ever notice Joan Crawford's tub from THE WOMEN re-used in "The Girl Hunt Ballet" in THE BAND WAGON 15 years later?

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Unread post by silentfilm » Tue Jan 08, 2008 12:55 pm

A big thank you to Derek Boothroyd, who checked a still that he has from Daddy's Gone-A-Hunting (1925), and noticed a similarity.

Image

Notice the showgirls and stage in the upper right-hand corner of this composite still. Derek's still even has a artist's model who is barely covered.

This film is supposed to exist in the Czech Film archive. It certainly looks interesting... :shock:

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Unread post by rudyfan » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:11 am

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:
rudyfan wrote:Funny, the bathtub looks like the one used in Ingram's Four Horsemen (antiques collected by the Josef Swickcard character), if so, MGM/Metro never tossed anything, did they?
They sure didn't. Ever notice Joan Crawford's tub from THE WOMEN re-used in "The Girl Hunt Ballet" in THE BAND WAGON 15 years later?
Yes, it was also used in an Our Gang short with Alfalfa in the tub!

And, no, I'm not obsessed with ornate bathtubs!
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Unread post by Frederica » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:08 am

silentfilm wrote: This film is supposed to exist in the Czech Film archive. It certainly looks interesting... :shock:
Yes, and it stars that Hunk of Virile Studliness, Percy Marmont. (?) Or not.

Fred

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Unread post by Harlett O'Dowd » Wed Jan 09, 2008 12:09 pm

Frederica wrote:
silentfilm wrote: This film is supposed to exist in the Czech Film archive. It certainly looks interesting... :shock:
Yes, and it stars that Hunk of Virile Studliness, Percy Marmont. (?) Or not.

Fred
??? do you mean that he's not a star or not a hunk?

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Unread post by Frederica » Wed Jan 09, 2008 1:04 pm

Harlett O'Dowd wrote:
Frederica wrote:
silentfilm wrote: This film is supposed to exist in the Czech Film archive. It certainly looks interesting... :shock:
Yes, and it stars that Hunk of Virile Studliness, Percy Marmont. (?) Or not.

Fred
??? do you mean that he's not a star or not a hunk?
HE LOOKS LIKE AN ACCOUNTANT!

Oops, not that there aren't a lot of studley accountants out there. My apologies to any testosterone-laden CPAs in the audience.

Fred

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Unread post by silentfilm » Wed Jan 09, 2008 1:31 pm

Well what do you expect with a name like Percy???!!!

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Jacqueline Logan and Percy Marmount in The Light That Failed (1923)

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Unread post by Frederica » Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:21 pm

silentfilm wrote:Well what do you expect with a name like Percy???!!!

Jacqueline Logan and Percy Marmount in The Light That Failed (1923)
See? There he is, with lovely Jacqueline Logan hanging off him, and he's concerned about his balance sheets.

Fred

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Unread post by Mike Gebert » Wed Jan 09, 2008 4:37 pm

"Corkers! Did I put the wife out and kiss the dog goodnight? I jolly well think I did!"
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Unread post by James Bazen » Fri Jan 11, 2008 10:03 am

Frederica wrote: See? There he is, with lovely Jacqueline Logan hanging off him, and he's concerned about his balance sheets.

Fred
Wait until you see him as Norma Talmadge's jerk of a husband in The Branded Woman. Actually, I've seen Marmount in a few British talkies from the late 30's or so, and I think he was one of those actors who seem handsomer in middle age than in youth. He was very distinguished looking by that point and he has a fine speaking voice.

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